E-Mail Alert

Add your e-mail address to receive forthcoming issues of this journal:

Journal Browser

Journal Browser

Special Issue "Polymer Processing: Modeling and Correlations Finalized to Tailoring the Plastic Part Morphology and Properties"

A special issue of Materials (ISSN 1996-1944).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 15 October 2018

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Giuseppe Titomanlio

Department of Industrial Engineering, University of Salerno, Via Giovanni Paolo II, I-84084 Fisciano, Italy
Website | E-Mail
Interests: polymer processing; flow induced crystallization and effect of crystallinity on rheology; morphology evolution during polymer processing; injection molding simulation
Guest Editor
Dr. Vito Speranza

Department of Industrial Engineering, University of Salerno, Via Giovanni Paolo II, I-84084 Fisciano, Italy
Website | E-Mail
Interests: effect of thermomechanical history on final structure of polymeric materials; analysis and numerical simulation of the injection molding process of thermoplastic materials; polymeric materials characterization; atomic force microscopy

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The analysis of polymer processing operations is a very wide and complex subject; indeed, during polymer processing, viscoelastic fluids are forced to deform into desired geometries using non-homogeneous velocity and temperature fields down to solidification. The objective of analysis is certainly the identification of processing conditions, which, more and more, are finalized to the optimization of product final properties, which, in their turn, are determined by the final part morphology.

Depending on the operating conditions, the properties of the final part can change even more than one order of magnitude. Properties of interest are certainly the mechanical, optical, barrier properties, the permeability, biodegradability and any other property of practical relevance including the characteristics of the surfaces as its finishing and wettability, which are connected one to the other.

The aim of this Special Issue is to select progresses or reviews in the understanding/description of the phenomena involved along the chain: Processing–morphology–properties. Obviously, along this virtual chain, the modeling may be a very useful approach  and within the objective of understanding  fundamental aspects it may also be relevant to compare selected characteristics of the process and of the material with characteristics of the resulting morphology and then with the properties of the final part. This approach suggested the title: “Polymer Processing: Modeling and Correlations Finalized to Tailoring the Plastic Part Morphology and Properties”.

Prof. Dr. Giuseppe Titomanlio
Dr. Vito Speranza
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Materials is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • polymer processing
  • modeling morphology evolution
  • morphology of polymeric parts in relation to their processing
  • morphology-properties relationships of polymeric parts
  • polymeric part properties

Published Papers (3 papers)

View options order results:
result details:
Displaying articles 1-3
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Review

Open AccessArticle Preparation Nano-Structure Polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) Functional Film on the Cellulose Insulation Polymer and Its Effect on the Breakdown Voltage and Hydrophobicity Properties
Materials 2018, 11(5), 851; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma11050851
Received: 21 April 2018 / Revised: 14 May 2018 / Accepted: 16 May 2018 / Published: 21 May 2018
PDF Full-text (10867 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Cellulose insulation polymer is an important component of oil-paper insulation, which is widely used in power transformer. The weight of the cellulose insulation polymer materials is as high as tens of tons in the larger converter transformer. Excellent performance of oil-paper insulation is
[...] Read more.
Cellulose insulation polymer is an important component of oil-paper insulation, which is widely used in power transformer. The weight of the cellulose insulation polymer materials is as high as tens of tons in the larger converter transformer. Excellent performance of oil-paper insulation is very important for ensuring the safe operation of larger converter transformer. An effective way to improve the insulation and the physicochemical property of the oil impregnated insulation pressboard/paper is currently a popular research topic. In this paper, the polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) functional film was coated on the cellulose insulation pressboard by radio frequency (RF) magnetron sputtering to improve its breakdown voltage and the hydrophobicity properties. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) results show that the nano-structure PTFE functional film was successfully fabricated on the cellulose insulation pressboard surface. The scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) present that the nanoscale size PTFE particles were attached to the pressboard surface and it exists in the amorphous form. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) shows that the sputtered pressboard surface is still rough. The rough PTFE functional film and the reduction of the hydrophilic hydroxyl of the surface due to the shielding effect of PTFE improve the breakdown and the hydrophobicity properties of the cellulose insulation pressboard obviously. This paper provides an innovative way to improve the performance of the cellulose insulation polymer. Full article
Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle “Skin-Core-Skin” Structure of Polymer Crystallization Investigated by Multiscale Simulation
Materials 2018, 11(4), 610; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma11040610
Received: 16 March 2018 / Revised: 6 April 2018 / Accepted: 13 April 2018 / Published: 16 April 2018
PDF Full-text (58492 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
“Skin-core-skin” structure is a typical crystal morphology in injection products. Previous numerical works have rarely focused on crystal evolution; rather, they have mostly been based on the prediction of temperature distribution or crystallization kinetics. The aim of this work was to achieve the
[...] Read more.
“Skin-core-skin” structure is a typical crystal morphology in injection products. Previous numerical works have rarely focused on crystal evolution; rather, they have mostly been based on the prediction of temperature distribution or crystallization kinetics. The aim of this work was to achieve the “skin-core-skin” structure and investigate the role of external flow and temperature fields on crystal morphology. Therefore, the multiscale algorithm was extended to the simulation of polymer crystallization in a pipe flow. The multiscale algorithm contains two parts: a collocated finite volume method at the macroscopic level and a morphological Monte Carlo method at the microscopic level. The SIMPLE (semi-implicit method for pressure linked equations) algorithm was used to calculate the polymeric model at the macroscopic level, while the Monte Carlo method with stochastic birth-growth process of spherulites and shish-kebabs was used at the microscopic level. Results show that our algorithm is valid to predict “skin-core-skin” structure, and the initial melt temperature and the maximum velocity of melt at the inlet mainly affects the morphology of shish-kebabs. Full article
Figures

Graphical abstract

Review

Jump to: Research

Open AccessReview Additive Manufacturing of Metallic and Ceramic Components by the Material Extrusion of Highly-Filled Polymers: A Review and Future Perspectives
Materials 2018, 11(5), 840; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma11050840
Received: 26 April 2018 / Revised: 11 May 2018 / Accepted: 16 May 2018 / Published: 18 May 2018
PDF Full-text (7209 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Additive manufacturing (AM) is the fabrication of real three-dimensional objects from metals, ceramics, or plastics by adding material, usually as layers. There are several variants of AM; among them material extrusion (ME) is one of the most versatile and widely used. In MEAM,
[...] Read more.
Additive manufacturing (AM) is the fabrication of real three-dimensional objects from metals, ceramics, or plastics by adding material, usually as layers. There are several variants of AM; among them material extrusion (ME) is one of the most versatile and widely used. In MEAM, molten or viscous materials are pushed through an orifice and are selectively deposited as strands to form stacked layers and subsequently a three-dimensional object. The commonly used materials for MEAM are thermoplastic polymers and particulate composites; however, recently innovative formulations of highly-filled polymers (HP) with metals or ceramics have also been made available. MEAM with HP is an indirect process, which uses sacrificial polymeric binders to shape metallic and ceramic components. After removing the binder, the powder particles are fused together in a conventional sintering step. In this review the different types of MEAM techniques and relevant industrial approaches for the fabrication of metallic and ceramic components are described. The composition of certain HP binder systems and powders are presented; the methods of compounding and filament making HP are explained; the stages of shaping, debinding, and sintering are discussed; and finally a comparison of the parts produced via MEAM-HP with those produced via other manufacturing techniques is presented. Full article
Figures

Graphical abstract

Planned Papers

The below list represents only planned manuscripts. Some of these manuscripts have not been received by the Editorial Office yet. Papers submitted to MDPI journals are subject to peer-review.

1. Author: Giuseppe Titomamlio

2. Author: Roberto Pantani

3. Author: Cengiz Altan

Back to Top