Special Issue "Liquid Membranes"

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A special issue of Membranes (ISSN 2077-0375).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 May 2011)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Michiaki Matsumoto

Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science; Doshisha University; Kyotanabe; Kyoto 610-0321, Japan
Website | E-Mail
Fax: +81 0774 656655
Interests: bioreaction engineering; separation technology; extraction; membrane separation

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

When liquids that are immiscible with the feed and receiving phases are used as membrane materials, they are referred to as liquid membranes.

Since the 1960s, liquid membrane technology has been applied to gas separation, recovery of metallic ions, removal of organic compounds and recovery of fermentation products; and has been combined with a biotechnological process. Although many studies on liquid membrane technology have been conducted, practical success was limited mainly due to instabilities of the membranes. However, recent liquid membrane technology has made considerable advances. For example, use of ionic liquids as membrane materials instead of conventional organic solvents can overcome the above weakness. Furthermore, their application has been extended to the fields of waste-water treatment, and food and beverage production. We welcome papers about recent advances of liquid membrane technology in the various fields. We also welcome papers about liquid membrane-related technology such as analytical application and plasticized membranes.

Prof. Dr. Michiaki Matsumoto
Guest Editor

Keywords

  • liquid membrane
  • supported membrane
  • emulsion
  • plasticized membrane
  • hybrid membrane

Related Special Issue

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle Liquid Phase Micro-Extraction of Linear Alkylbenzene Sulfonate Anionic Surfactants in Aqueous Samples
Membranes 2011, 1(4), 299-313; doi:10.3390/membranes1040299
Received: 30 August 2011 / Accepted: 4 October 2011 / Published: 13 October 2011
Cited by 6 | PDF Full-text (342 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Hollow fiber liquid phase micro-extraction (LPME) of linear alkylbenzene sulfonates (LAS) from aqueous samples was studied. Ion pair extraction of C10, C11, C12 and C13 homologues was facilitated with trihexylamine as ion-pairing agent, using di-n-hexylether
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Hollow fiber liquid phase micro-extraction (LPME) of linear alkylbenzene sulfonates (LAS) from aqueous samples was studied. Ion pair extraction of C10, C11, C12 and C13 homologues was facilitated with trihexylamine as ion-pairing agent, using di-n-hexylether as solvent for the supported liquid membrane (SLM). Effects of extraction time, acceptor buffer concentration, stirring speed, sample volume, NaCl and humic acids were studied. At 10–50 µg L−1 linear R2-coefficients were 0.99 for C10 and C11 and 0.96 for C12. RSD was typically ~15%. Three observations were especially made. Firstly, LPME for these analytes was unusually slow with maximum enrichment observed after 15–24 h (depending on sample volume). Secondly, the enrichment depended on LAS sample concentration with 35–150 times enrichment below ~150 µg L−1 and 1850–4400 times enrichment at 1 mg L−1. Thirdly, lower homologues were enriched more than higher homologues at low sample concentrations, with reversed conditions at higher concentrations. These observations may be due to the fact that LAS and the amine counter ion themselves influence the mass transfer at the water-SLM interface. The observations on LPME of LAS may aid in LPME application to other compounds with surfactant properties or in surfactant enhanced membrane extraction of other compounds. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Liquid Membranes)
Open AccessArticle Nickel (II) Preconcentration and Speciation Analysis During Transport from Aqueous Solutions Using a Hollow-fiber Permeation Liquid Membrane (HFPLM) Device
Membranes 2011, 1(3), 217-231; doi:10.3390/membranes1030217
Received: 23 May 2011 / Revised: 27 July 2011 / Accepted: 12 August 2011 / Published: 18 August 2011
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (564 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Nickel (II) preconcentration and speciation analysis using a hollow fiber supported liquid membrane (HFSLM) device was studied. A counterflow of protons coupled to complexation with formate provided the driving force of the process, while Kelex 100 was employed as carrier. The influence of
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Nickel (II) preconcentration and speciation analysis using a hollow fiber supported liquid membrane (HFSLM) device was studied. A counterflow of protons coupled to complexation with formate provided the driving force of the process, while Kelex 100 was employed as carrier. The influence of variables related to module configuration (acceptor pH and carrier concentration) and to the sample properties (donor pH) on the preconcentration factor, E, was simultaneously studied and optimized using a 3 factor Doehlert matrix response surface methodology. The effect of metal concentration was studied as well. Preconcentration factors as high as 4240 were observed  depending on the values of the different variables. The effects of the presence of inorganic anions (NO2-, SO42-, Cl-, NO3-, CO32-, CN-) and dissolved organic matter (DOM) in the form of humic acids were additionally considered in order to carry out a speciation analysis study. Nickel preconcentration was observed to be independent of both effects, except when cyanide was present in the donor phase. A characterization of the transport regime was performed through the analysis of the dependence of E on the temperature. E increases with the increase in temperature according to the equation E(K) = -8617.3 + 30.5T with an activation energy of 56.7 kJ mol-1 suggesting a kinetic-controlled regime. Sample depletion ranged from 12 to 1.2% depending on the volume of the donor phase (100 to 1000 mL, respectively). Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Liquid Membranes)
Figures

Open AccessArticle Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy—A Simple Method for the Characterization of Polymer Inclusion Membranes Containing Aliquat 336
Membranes 2011, 1(2), 132-148; doi:10.3390/membranes1020132
Received: 6 April 2011 / Revised: 3 June 2011 / Accepted: 16 June 2011 / Published: 23 June 2011
Cited by 11 | PDF Full-text (336 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) has been used to estimate the non-frequency dependent (static) dielectric constants of base polymers such as poly(vinyl chloride) (PVC), cellulose triacetate (CTA) and polystyrene (PS). Polymer inclusion membranes (PIMs) containing different amounts of PVC or CTA, along with the
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Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) has been used to estimate the non-frequency dependent (static) dielectric constants of base polymers such as poly(vinyl chloride) (PVC), cellulose triacetate (CTA) and polystyrene (PS). Polymer inclusion membranes (PIMs) containing different amounts of PVC or CTA, along with the room temperature ionic liquid Aliquat 336 and plasticizers such as trisbutoxyethyl phosphate (TBEP), dioctyl sebecate (DOS) and 2-nitrophenyloctyl ether (NPOE) have been investigated. In this study, the complex and abstract method of EIS has been applied in a simple and easy to use way, so as to make the method accessible to membrane scientists and engineers who may not possess the detailed knowledge of electrochemistry and interfacial science needed for a rigorous interpretation of EIS results. The EIS data reported herein are internally consistent with a percolation threshold in the dielectric constant at high concentrations of Aliquat 336, which illustrates the suitability of the EIS technique since membrane percolation with ion exchangers is a well-known phenomenon. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Liquid Membranes)
Open AccessArticle Effect of Ammonium- and Phosphonium-Based Ionic Liquids on the Separation of Lactic Acid by Supported Ionic Liquid Membranes (SILMs)
Membranes 2011, 1(2), 98-108; doi:10.3390/membranes1020098
Received: 14 March 2011 / Revised: 26 April 2011 / Accepted: 6 May 2011 / Published: 13 May 2011
Cited by 9 | PDF Full-text (297 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Biodegradable polymers have attracted much attention from an environmental point of view. Optically pure lactic acid that can be prepared by fermentation is one of the important raw materials for biodegradable polymer. The separation and purification of lactic acid from the fermentation broth
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Biodegradable polymers have attracted much attention from an environmental point of view. Optically pure lactic acid that can be prepared by fermentation is one of the important raw materials for biodegradable polymer. The separation and purification of lactic acid from the fermentation broth are the major portions of the production costs. We proposed the application of supported ionic liquid membranes to recovering lactic acid. In this paper, the effect of ionic liquids, such as Aliquat 336, CYPHOS IL-101, CYPHOS IL-102, CYPHOS IL-104, CYPHOS IL-109 and CYPHOS IL-111 on the lactic acid permeation have been studied. Aliquat 336, CYPHOS IL-101 and CYPHOS IL-102 were found to be the best membrane solvents as far as membrane stability and permeation of lactic acid are concerned. CYPHOS IL-109 and CYPHOS IL-111 were found to be unsuitable, as they leak out from the pores of the supported liquid membrane (SLM), thereby allowing free transport of lactic acid as well as hydrochloric acid. CYPHOS IL-102 was found to be the most adequate (Permeation rate = 60.41%) among these ionic liquids as far as the separation of lactic acid is concerned. The permeation mechanisms, by which ionic liquid-water complexes act as the carrier of lactate and hydrochloric acid, were proposed. The experimental permeation results have been obtained as opposed to the expected values from the solution-diffusion mechanism. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Liquid Membranes)

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