Special Issue "The Progress on Pharmaceutics in Drug Delayed Release System"

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A special issue of Pharmaceutics (ISSN 1999-4923).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 July 2011)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Neal M. Davies (Website)

Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Manitoba, Apotex Centre, 750 McDermot Avenue, Winnipeg, Manitoba R3E OT5, Canada
Fax: +1 509 335 5902
Interests: pharmacokinetics; chirality; drug interactions; formulation and drug delivery

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

It is often important to maintain therapeutic plasma concentrations for drugs exhibiting a short terminal half-life; for this, dosage forms with a lower input rate have been developed and pharmaceutical manufacturing of controlled, extended, and sustained release formulations have developed and evolved. With the advent of a variety of new delivery platforms and systems, formulations, biomaterials, technologies and a plethora of exciting selected therapeutic approaches significant progress on the pharmaceutics of drug delayed release systems has ensued. Therapeutic delivery of macromolecules is evolving with the aim of controlling absorption, distribution, metabolism, and cellular uptake through programmed drug delivery. Specifically, drug targeting by carriers utilizing pro-drugs, synthetic polymers, lipids, and various nanocarrier approaches is becoming more frequently incorporated into drug controlled release systems. This alteration and manipulation of input and output rates of drugs is becoming increasingly complex and drug delivery has evolved in advancing and altering release. This special issue serves to highlight and capture  a variety of advances and illustrate the remaining challenges of contemporary progress in the pharmaceutics of drug modified release systems. We invite articles on all aspects of pharmaceutics in drug delayed release systems for this special issue.

Prof. Dr. Neal M. Davies
Guest Editor

Keywords

  • drug delivery
  • drug release
  • drug formulation
  • dosage forms
  • Nanocarrier technologies
  • Sustained release
  • Lipids
  • polymers
  • delayed release
  • modified release
  • biomaterials

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Open AccessArticle Mucoadhesive Gels Designed for the Controlled Release of Chlorhexidine in the Oral Cavity
Pharmaceutics 2011, 3(4), 665-679; doi:10.3390/pharmaceutics3040665
Received: 21 July 2011 / Revised: 9 September 2011 / Accepted: 26 September 2011 / Published: 27 September 2011
Cited by 6 | PDF Full-text (247 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
This study describes the in vitro/ex vivo buccal release of chlorhexidine (CHX) from nine mucoadhesive aqueous gels, as well as their physicochemical and mucoadhesive properties: CHX was present at a constant 1% w/v concentration in the chemical form of digluconate salt. The [...] Read more.
This study describes the in vitro/ex vivo buccal release of chlorhexidine (CHX) from nine mucoadhesive aqueous gels, as well as their physicochemical and mucoadhesive properties: CHX was present at a constant 1% w/v concentration in the chemical form of digluconate salt. The mucoadhesive/gel forming materials were carboxymethyl- (CMC), hydroxypropylmethyl- (HPMC) and hydroxypropyl- (HPC) cellulose, alone (3% w/w) or in binary mixtures (5% w/w); gels were tested for their mucoadhesion using the mucin method at 1, 2 and 3% w/w concentrations. CHX release from different formulations was assessed using a USP method and newly developed apparatus, combining release/permeation process in which porcine mucosa was placed in a Franz cell. The combination of HPMC or HPC with CMC showed slower drug release when compared to each of the individual polymers. All the systems proved suitable for CHX buccal delivery, being able to guarantee both prolonged release and reduced transmucosal permeation. Gels were compared for the release of previously studied tablets that contained Carbopol and HPMC, alone or in mixture. An accurate selection and combination of the materials allow the design of different pharmaceutical forms suitable for different purposes, by simply modifying the formulation compositions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Progress on Pharmaceutics in Drug Delayed Release System)

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