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26–27 July 2017 Religion and Aesthetics

Department of Philosophy, University of Nottingham, Nottingham, UK

CFP: Religion and Aesthetics

Machiado Suite, University of Nottingham

26th and 27th July 2017

Aesthetic considerations have frequently played an important role within various religious traditions. For example, certain religious doctrines ascribe beauty to God, to various religious exemplars, and even to the cosmos itself. Similarly, various religious practices and rituals involve the use of music, dance, and architecture (alongside a variety of other artistic elements). Further, the world’s religions have inspired the creation of innumerable great artworks across a range of forms and genres. These fundamental connections between the religious and the aesthetic have, however, been somewhat neglected of late and are therefore ripe for sustained investigation, which this conference aims to promote. The conference will bring together both aestheticians and philosophers with expertise and interest in various religious traditions to consider the many ways that aesthetic and religious values, practices, and experiences might relate to one another.

Our conception of ‘religious’ and ‘aesthetic’ is capacious, and all papers must attend to both. So, potential topics include, but are not limited to:

  • Embodied aesthetic experience in religious contexts
  • Moral beauty and the aesthetics of character in religious traditions
  • Religious architecture, places, and environments
  • Religious music, literature, poetry, and narrative
  • Ritual and aestheticized religious practices
  • The aesthetic concepts, experiences, and practices distinctive to (particular) religious traditions
  • The aesthetic significance of natural creatures, places, and processes in religious life
  • The aesthetics of mystical, epiphanic, and pankalic experiences
  • The nature and role of beauty in religious traditions
  • The role of aesthetic practices and experiences in religious lives
  • The putative aesthetic properties of transcendent entities such as God

SUBMISSIONS

We invite anonymised abstracts of no more than 300 words (excluding references). All abstracts will be checked for anonymization prior to review. Speakers will have 75 mins, to be roughly divided between talk and discussion. We particularly welcome submissions from members of underrepresented groups. Accommodation and meals will be provided, and some funding will be available to defray travel costs.

Deadline for submissions: 31st May 2017

Date for notification of decisions: 5th June 2017

Submissions to  religiousaesthetics@gmail.com

Enquiries to ian.kidd@nottingham.ac.uk

ACCESSIBILITY

This event is compliant with the BPA-SWIP Good Practice Scheme. We will offer such childcare facilities as our university can provide: let us know as soon as possible if you need it. We will provide full accessibility information in advance of the conference and do all we can to assist attendees with specific requirements.

We are grateful to the British Society of Aesthetics for their generous funding for this event.

https://philevents.org/event/show/32158

6–10 August 2017 17th World Congress of Jewish Studies

Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Israel

We are happy to announce that the Seventeenth World Congress of Jewish Studies will take place from August 6 to 10, 2017 at the Mount Scopus Campus of the Hebrew University of Jerusalem.

The World Congress of Jewish Studies convenes in Jerusalem every four years, and is the most important event in Jewish studies worldwide. The last Congress in 2013 brought together thousands of participants from over 40 countries, who attended nearly 1600 lectures in various fields and on many diverse topics in Jewish studies. The lectures were presented by scholars from all the important centers and institutions of Jewish learning. The Congress also features a comprehensive book fair, as well as hosted social and cultural events to give participants the opportunity to share various aspects of Jewish culture.

Listeners can pay for participation here, according to this price list.

Congress program can be found here.

http://www.jewish-studies.org/17con_en.ehtml#

8 August 2017 The International Association for the Psychology of Religion (IAPR) Conference 2017

Hamar, Norway

World conference for the Psychology of Religion

IAPR holds bi-annual conferences that serve as a meeting point for scholars from all over the world to share the latest research findings in the field. The IAPR Conference 2017 will be held in Hamar, Norway and will take place in 21 – 24 August.

The keynote speakers are Dr. Valerie DeMarinis, Dr Kenneth I. Pargament, Dr. Mohammad Khodayarifard, and Dr. Tatjana Schnell. They are all world leading researchers in psychology, religion and spirituality, culture and existential meaning-making. In addition, the program consists of a number of presentations and seminars.

Increasingly, the IAPR Conferences have become an essential place for meeting and dialogue between researchers and scholars from a vast array of countries. We expect to cover a wide variety of topics connecting psychology and religious behaviour such as religion and mental health, religion and psychological development, religion/spirituality, religious development, cultural perspective, neurosciences. The language of this Conference will be English.

http://www.norway2017.iaprweb.org/

25–26 August 2017 International Conference on Religious Studies

Warsaw, Poland

Whether you consider yourself a religious person or not, or whether you think religion has played a positive or negative role in history, it is an incontrovertible fact that from the beginning of time, humans have engaged in activities that we now call religion, such as worship, prayer, and rituals marking important life passages. Moreover, religions have always asked fundamental questions, such as: What is the true meaning of life? What happens to us after death? How do we explain human suffering and injustices? The answers different religious traditions give to these important questions are many and varied and often contradictory. But the questions themselves are ones with which humans throughout time have grappled, and probably will continue to grapple with into the indefinite future. Thus, one of the first reasons to study religion is simply to deepen our understanding of others and ourselves.

We also study religion in order to learn more about how different aspects of human life—politics, science, literature, art, law, economics—have been and continue to be shaped by changing religious notions of, for example, good and evil, images of the deity and the divine, salvation and punishment, etc. By studying different religious doctrines, rituals, stories, and scriptures, we can also come to understand how different communities of believers—past and present, East and West—have used their religious traditions to shape, sustain, transform themselves.

More than ever before, the world we live in is both multicultural and global. We no longer need to travel across the ocean to visit a Hindu temple or an Islamic mosque or to meet a Sikh or a Jain. The chances are that you can find a temple or mosque within a few miles of where you live, and it is almost certain that you will be meet someone from any and all of these religious traditions anywhere. This makes it even more essential that we cultivate our ability to understand and interpret other people’s religious traditions.

Finally, the academic study of religion is inherently multidisciplinary. With religion one can learn about a range of disciplinary approaches, and, even more importantly, the connections and linkages among them. In this way studying religion invites us all to think in a more interdisciplinary and integral way about the world and our place in it. The conference offers an interdisciplinary approach to the critical study of religion: history, literature, languages, material culture etc.

Papers are invited on topics related, but not limited, to:

  • Anthropology of religion
  • Cultural anthropology of religion
  • Economics of religion
  • Geography of religion
  • History of religion
  • Literary approaches
  • Neurological approaches
  • Origin of religion
  • Psychology of religion
  • Sociology of religion
  • Law and religion
  • Religion and film
  • Philosophy of Religion
  • Religious Ethics
  • Theology

We also welcome poster proposals that address one of the conference themes.

Proposals up to 250 words and a brief biographical note should be sent by 10 June 2017 to: religion@lcir.co.uk

Download paper proposal form.

Papers presented at the conference will be published in an e-Book with an ISBN number.

Full registration fee – 130 GBP

Student registration fee – 100 GBP

Venue: KOPERNIKA Conference Centre, ul. Kopernika 30, Warsaw

http://religion.lcir.co.uk/

28–30 September 2017 Sacred Landscapes: The Role of Religion, Spirituality and Faith in Landscape Morphology

University of Milan, Italy

Coordinators:
Daniel Cooper, School of Geography and the Environment, University of Oxford (cooperwave@gmail.com)
Jonathan Turnbull, School of Geography and the Environment, University of Oxford ( jonathon.turnbull@chch.ox.ac.uk)

Religion, spirituality and faith play integral roles in landscape transformation. Not only do spiritual beliefs and religious institutions inform individual and collective perspectives and engagement with each other and the land, but they also influence concepts of morality and justice in government, non-government, private, multilateral, and academic organizations. The fields of historical ecology, political ecology and spiritual ecology represent important frames of reference for understanding the complex dialects embedded in landscape. Most of the scholarship in these fields focuses on the nature-culture ontological continuum and biocultural integrity, often framing spirituality as an aspect of culture. However, many individuals and communities, including most indigenous populations, see beyond this binary framework to a deeper and more holistic understanding of landscape that includes a metaphysical or spiritual dimension. In such ontologies, social and environmental ethics are often dictated and enforced by other-than-human beings/biospiritual agents and interlocutors such as shamans, priests or priestesses. These beings and practitioners influence the way people perceive, feel and behave, often determining how and where resources are extracted and cultivated. The  objective of this workshop is to bridge the gap between science and religion in pursuit of a more integrated and holistic understanding of landscape, resource exploitation, conflict, governance, development and climate change.

http://sites.unimi.it/AISNA/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/Call-for-Papers.pdf

6 October 2017 ‘Our dance is turned into mourning’: Loss and Consolation in Early Modern Europe

Departments of English and Comparative Literature, University of Chicago

CALL FOR PAPERS,

‘Our dance is turned into mourning’: Loss and Consolation in Early Modern Europe

Keynote Speaker: Lynn Enterline, Professor and Nancy Perot Chair in the Department of English, Vanderbilt University

Doctoral students in the Departments of English and Comparative Literature at the University of Chicago invite faculty and graduate student submissions to a one-day symposium on early modern (c. 1500-1700) European cultures of loss and consolation, to be held on October 6, 2017. Along with panel presentations, the symposium will feature a keynote address by Lynn Enterline, as well as a roundtable discussion by faculty from Chicago-area universities.

Loss is a familiar topos to scholars of the Renaissance and early modern Europe, on scales large and small. In the sixteenth-century Netherlands, waves of Reform iconoclasm lead to whitewashed churches stripped bare of the religious artwork that had formerly adorned them. Tragedy flourishes in European theatres. England’s King Charles I loses his head. In the texts and artifacts of the period, loss emerges as a moral an epistemological problem, a political crisis, a site of performance for gendered subjectivities and religious identities, and a lyric trope. Moreover, loss destabilizes the very notion of the political states we call “Europe”: in a world dramatically altered by the rise of capitalism, colonial imperialism, religious violence, and developments in the sciences, boundaries and borders are extended, distended, and dissolved. And, for scholars today working on such materials, the archive constitutes a precarious space that testifies as much to historical loss as to survival. Yet even as loss assumes new forms in the early modern period, so too does consolation, as individuals, communities, and states alike seek salves, buffers, and antidotes.

On the stage and the page, in political thought and material culture, in science and theology, loss and consolation find new forms and acquire new purchase. However, scholars attempting to answer the questions raised by these phenomena too often do so without the chance to converse with others thinking about early modern loss and consolation throughout the humanistic and social scientific disciplines. The aim of this symposium is to consider the double notion of loss and consolation not only as it traverses the early modern European landscape, but as it remakes that landscape and generates new points of interdisciplinary contact. The historical and cultural study of loss and its antidotes in early modern Europe can be a productive site at which disciplines themselves “lose” their bearings and discover the resources of other academic contexts and frameworks.

We welcome submissions on various aspects of our theme, including:

  • Anxiety and the anticipation of future loss
  • Grief, mourning, and funerary culture
  • Political loss, exile, and diaspora
  • Nostalgia, amnesia, forgetting, and historical narrative
  • Loss and consolation as occasions for the performance of gender and     sexuality
  • The genres of representing loss, and the comforts of literary form
  • Philosophy and religion as consolatory discourses
  • Loss of faith, atheism
  • Anti-sociality and melancholia as resistance
  • Personal and collective disappointment
  • The early modern archive and the affective dimensions of the digital humanities

These are only suggestions; we anticipate a rich and exciting range of submissions from faculty and graduate students from any field. Some fields we expect to be represented at this symposium are Romance languages, Germanic languages, philosophy, religious studies, English, history, art history, gender and sexuality studies, cultural studies, critical theory, rhetoric, and comparative literatures.

We are inviting submissions for 20-minute oral presentations on the symposium theme. Please submit abstracts of 200-300 words to loss.uchicago@gmail.com by July 15, 2017. 

https://renaissance.commons.gc.cuny.edu/2017/05/09/due-july-15-cfp-our-dance-is-turned-into-mourning-loss-and-consolation-in-early-modern-europe/

13–14 October 2017 Religion, Normativity, Method

Virginia Graduate Colloquium, University of Virginia, USA

Religions make normative claims and scholars have normative commitments. However, religious studies often conceives of itself as an empirical discipline, aligning itself with other disciplines that are ostensibly descriptive, like history, sociology, and anthropology. This tension has led to polarization within religious studies.

The 2017 Virginia Graduate Colloquium aims to point beyond the “descriptive/normative” binary by highlighting new and overlooked methodologies—methodologies that, for example, do not view descriptive and normative approaches as antagonistic, or that are frank about their normative and constructive intentions while remaining alert to the hazards of purportedly objective or universal claims.

We solicit work that exemplifies such methodologies, or that analyzes the “descriptive/normative” binary in illuminating ways. Graduate students from a variety of disciplines and backgrounds are welcome, as are their different approaches to the study of religion.

The prominent social theorist Hans Joas will deliver our keynote address on presuppositions in the study of religion. Joas holds appointments at Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin and the Committee on Social Thought at the University of Chicago and his publications include The Creativity of Action, The Genesis of Values, and The Sacredness of the Person.

 In the role of faculty convener, professors the Department of Religious Studies at UVa will offer extended responses, offering both commentary on papers and reflections on the treatment of normativity in their own work.

We welcome papers addressing the themes above and especially encourage papers from, or in critical dialogue with, the following orientations:

Aesthetics & normativity—

  • strategic uses of aesthetics for political and social projects.
  • the formation or malformation of selves in aesthetic experience.
  • the relationship between justice and beauty.
  • modern approaches to the convertibility of the transcendentals.
    • Faculty convener: Nichole Flores

Normativity from below

  • anthropological and ethnographic methods as a starting point for normative work.
  • normative implications of descriptive projects.
  • ontological and epistemological limits of ethical frameworks.
  • categories of analysis that emerge from particular contexts or the subject-matter under study.
    • Faculty convener: Willis Jenkins

Fragility & normativity—

  • ways fragility motivates or directs the sense of ‘what matters.’
  • undervalued non-Western sources for ethical reflection.
  • fear of madness and suffering in philosophy.
    • Faculty convener: Sonam Kachru

*

Please submit proposals of 250-500 words by July 1st in the form of a Word attachment (.docx) to VirginiaGraduateColloquium [at] gmail [dot] com. Include your name, institution, and degree-program in the body of the message.

Applicants will be notified by August 1st and final papers will be due by September 15th. Presentations should run for fifteen minutes. Each panel will be followed by a 15-minute faculty response. As in past years, participants will be hosted by current Virginia students and offered meals and transportation. Limited funds are available to off-set expenses for those presenters without departmental support.

Contact Email: 

VirginiaGraduateColloquium@gmail.com

https://networks.h-net.org/node/73374/announcements/177263/virginia-graduate-colloquium-theology-ethics-and-culture-2017

19–20 October 2017 Women in Early Modern Philosophy

Department of Philosophy, Lehigh University, Bethlehem, USA

Lehigh University 5th Annual Philosophy Conference

Bethlehem PA 18015 USA

Thursday, October 19, 2017 – Friday, October 20, 2017

The Lehigh University Philosophy Department welcomes abstracts concerning any aspect of the philosophical work of -- or about -- women during the Early Modern Period. We are looking forward to proposals related to any field of philosophy -- from metaphysics and epistemology to ethics, aesthetics, political theory, and philosophy of religion. We are interested both in proposals that are primarily historical and in those that emphasize the contemporary relevance of texts from this period. Keynote Speakers: Karen Detlefsen University of Pennsylvania Marcy Lascano California State University, Long Beach Submission Deadline July 17, 2017 Electronic submissions of abstracts (350 words) should be in Word or pdf format. Reading time for presented papers is 30 minutes; there will be 10 minutes for discussion.   Please submit abstracts to https://easychair.org/cfp/LUPHIL_2017 or rw03@lehigh.edu Please include a cover sheet with your name, paper title, institutional affiliation, and contact information.

https://philevents.org/event/show/32118

19–22 October 2017 Sermon: Text and Performance

Marshall University, USA

"If church language is useful
in describing how theater works,
perhaps theatrical language could be useful
in describing how church works."

This statement, from the introduction to Shannon Craigo-Snell's The Empty Church: Theater, Theology, and Bodily Hope (Oxford, 2014) could be something of a "motto" for the 2017 Conference on Sermon Studies. This year's theme is "Sermon: Text and Performance"; we welcome proposals examining sermons of all faiths from a variety of disciplinary perspectives. Click the link on the left to see the full Call for Papers, and we look forward to seeing you in Huntington in October!

http://mds.marshall.edu/sermon_conference/

20–21 October 2017 The Communities and Margins of Early Modern Scotland

St Mungo’s Museum, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, UK

“The Communities and Margins of Early Modern Scotland” is a two-day international conference which will be held at St. Mungo’s Museum, Glasgow, on the 20 and 21 of October 2017.

Our aim is to provide a space for postgraduates, early career researchers, and academics to come together and facilitate lively discussion on narratives surrounding the concept of the ‘community’ and those who participated on the margins of early modern Scotland.

For more information, please contact: scottishstudies2017@gmail.com

Tweet us at @CommMargins17

https://communitiesandmarginsofearlymodernscotland.wordpress.com/

23–24 October 2017 International Conference: "Digital Approaches to Genocide Studies"

University of Southern California, Los Angeles

The USC Shoah Foundation Center for Advanced Genocide Research invites proposals for its 2017 International Conference “Digital Approaches to Genocide Studies” that will be co-sponsored by the USC Mellon Digital Humanities Program.

The USC Shoah Foundation Center for Advanced Genocide Research (http://sfi.usc.edu/cagr) is dedicated to advancing new areas of interdisciplinary research on the Holocaust and other genocides. One of the Center’s primary research themes is Digital Genocide Studies. 

Digital technologies have begun to significantly influence contemporary scholarship, theories, and methods in the social sciences and humanities. The USC Shoah Foundation Center for Advanced Genocide Research invites scholars from all disciplines to examine the relationships between digital methodologies, practices, ethics and contemporary Holocaust and genocide studies. How can digital humanities shape, challenge, or complement contemporary genocide studies and vice versa?

The two-day international conference “Digital Approaches to Genocide Studies” will be held on October 23-24, 2017 at the University of Southern California in Los Angeles, California. The conference will investigate the ways in which digital tools and methods, new media, and information technologies can help us to challenge conventional wisdom regarding Holocaust and Genocide Studies by raising new questions, improving our understanding, deepening our analysis, widening our field of view, or pioneering new approaches. Especially of interest would be how digital humanists from a range of disciplines and methodologies can broaden our methodological approaches to the study of the causes, consequences, and prevention of genocide. 

We encourage diverse approaches to the conference theme that draw from a wide variety of critical lenses and approaches, as well as focus on any time period, case study, or medium.

Submissions on the following themes are particularly encouraged:

  • Digital methodologies and their applicability to genocide studies
  • Quantitative genocide research
  • Big data methodologies and comparative genocide studies
  • Digital technologies (such as wearable devices, 3D printing, and others) and their applicability to genocide studies
  • Creation, curation, promotion and analysis of digital genocide resources and collections
  • Audio and visual genocide testimonies and their digitization, preservation, and accessibility
  • Social, institutional, global/regional, multicultural, and multilingual aspects of digital genocide research
  • Ethics of digital genocide studies
  • Tools and methods of genocide studies that could fruitfully contribute to or influence the digital sphere and the field of digital humanities

https://sfi.usc.edu/news/2016/11/12664-call-papers-digital-approaches-genocide-studies

26–28 October 2017 Ways of Knowing 2017

University of St Andrews, UK

Special Announcement

Ways of Knowing 2017

Ways of Knowing 2017, the 6th annual graduate conference on religion at Harvard Divinity School, will be held October 26-28, 2017 in on the HDS campus in Cambridge, MA.

A general call for papers will be posted in spring, 2017.

--------------------

The Science, Religion, and Culture Program at Harvard Divinity School will hold the 5th annual "Ways of Knowing: Graduate Conference on Religion" October 27-29, 2016, on the campus of Harvard Divinity School in Cambridge, MA. 

Inaugurated in 2012, Ways of Knowing (WOK) is a multi-day event made up of thematic panels that cross religious traditions, academic disciplines, and intellectual and theological commitments. In addition, the conference features special panels on professionalization, addressing both academic and non-academic careers, and a keynote address. The conference aims at promoting lively interdisciplinary discussion of prevailing assumptions (both within and outside the academy) about the differentiation, organization, authorization, and reproduction of various modes of knowing and doing religion.

Last year, 128 students and early career scholars representing over 60 graduate programs worldwide gathered to present their research. Following the success of our previous conferences, we invite graduate students and early career scholars to submit paper proposals from of a variety of theoretical, methodological, and disciplinary perspectives.

This year is a particularly momentous year as the conference will celebrate its fifth anniversary alongside the bicentennial of Harvard Divinity School.

Any inquiries can be directed to Khytie Brown or H. McLetchie-Leader, Conference Coordinators, at wokconference.harvardsrc@gmail.com.

October 27-29, 2016

Harvard Divinity School
Andover Hall
45 Francis Ave, Cambridge, MA

http://projects.iq.harvard.edu/gradreligionconference/home

26–27 October 2017 Call for Papers - Sacred Journeys: Pilgrimage and Religious Tourism 4th Global Conference

IU China Gateway, Beijing

Please click here to view a Chinese version.

The latest research indicates that more than 400 million people embark annually on traditional pilgrimages in Saudi Arabia, India, Japan, and elsewhere, with the numbers steadily increasing. Pilgrimage is one of the most ancient practices of humankind and is associated with a great variety of religious and spiritual traditions, beliefs and sacred geographies. These include the small-scale ‘walkabout’ of Outback Australian Aborigines in search of their own and their country’s spiritual renewal, the Sufi journey to the Mausoleum of Sidi Shaykh in the Algerian West Sahara, or to Lourdes in France, which welcomes over five million Catholic pilgrims each year in search of healing or deliverance.

For some, pilgrimage is prescribed, as with the Hajj, one of the Five Pillars of Islam. In other settings, pilgrimage is more akin to religious or heritage tourism, as in China, where millions of people visit imperial mountains like Tai Shan or cultural sites such as Huang Shan (Yellow Mountain). Adoration by influential poets, painters, and philosophers over thousands of years has turned this latter site into a modern-day place of pilgrimage of international repute. One question that might be addressed at this conference is whether the overdevelopment of such significant places poses a threat to their sustainability. 

Anthropologist Victor Turner once wrote that every tourist is part pilgrim, and every pilgrim is part tourist. Tourists and pilgrims are often described as being at either end of a continuum, with the former representing the leisure/pleasure seeker and the latter seeking communion with a deity. While Confucius described tourism as a fruitful practice that was good for the promotion of one’s virtues, the objective of pilgrims is often spiritual in nature. Some pilgrims will seek a vision of the deity, perform penance, obtain blessings, ask for children or cures, or pray for a long life or avert calamities, etc. 

Today, apart from such religious motives, people will visit sacred sites out of curiosity or simply for peace of mind in their fast-paced existence. Some hope to validate their knowledge of ancient practices, while still others know something is missing in their lives, something not found in the materialism that the world offers as a cure-all. The religious tourism industry refers to the development of religious or spiritual sites as tourist destinations, attracting pilgrims for the purposes of worship, and also non-religious people, for sightseeing, heritage, and cultural practices. In this conference, speakers may address any aspect of this growing phenomenon.

This conference is the fourth in the series on sacred journeys, with the first two held at Oxford University’s Mansfield College and the third in Prague. As in previous gatherings, we will explore the practice of pilgrimage and religious tourism in global perspective from every conceivable angle, including the similarities and differences in the practice in Islam, Hinduism, Buddhism, Christianity, Taoism, and other traditions, and secular pilgrimage. The impact of the internet and globalization, pilgrimage as protest, and pilgrimage and peace building, etc. are potential topics, as is the concept of the internal pilgrimage and the journey of self-discovery. The experiential, practical, historical, and psychological aspects of the sacred journey are central to our exploration, and we encourage all those seeking to participate to consider their work in this larger frame. From the perspective of religious tourism, we seek papers discussing both theory and practice, motivations, media and technology, culture and heritage, the management of sacred sites, cultures as tourist products, tourism and commodification of culture, etc.

What to Send, What to Keep in Mind, and Who to Send to

Proposals in English should address the aforementioned themes, as well as related ones. Proposals with a maximum of 300 words in Microsoft Word (.doc or .docx) format should be submitted by email no later than June 1, 2017. They should include:

  1. Author(s)
  2. Affiliation
  3. Email address
  4. Title of Proposal
  5. Body of Proposal
  6. Keywords (up to 10)

Times New Roman 12 should be used for the entire proposal, without any footnotes, special formatting, characters, or emphasis. The subject line of the email should read: Sacred Journeys 4 Proposal Submission. Proposals (and correspondence) should be sent to Dr. Ian S McIntosh of Indiana University—Purdue University Indianapolis (imcintos@iupui.edu) and Prof Chadwick Co Sy Su of the University of the Philippines Manila (ccsysu@up.edu.ph). We acknowledge receipt and respond to all proposals submitted, which are then reviewed by at least two members of the conference committee. Upon approval of the proposal, a draft paper (maximum of 5000 words) is requested by September 15, 2017. Final papers will be considered for a special issue of the International Journal of Religious Tourism and Pilgrimage.

Registration fees are as follows: USD100 for international participants, USD50 for Chinese participants, USD50 for international students, and USD25 for Chinese students.

Conference sponsors: Indiana University; IUPUI School of Physical Education and Tourism Management; IUPUI Department of Religious Studies; University of the Philippines Manila Department of Arts and Communication.

Venue: Indiana University (IU) China Gateway – Beijing, China
Office B601D, 6th Floor, Block B CERNET Tower, Tsinghua Science Park, Building 8
No. 1 Zhongguancun East Road, Haidian District, Beijing 100084   P.R. China

https://global.iu.edu/global-gateways/china/news-events/news/2017-03-06-call-for-papers-sacred-journeys.html

3–10 November 2017 The 4th Virtual International Conference on the Dialogue between Science and Theology

University of Constanta, Romania

The goal of the Virtual Conference on the Dialogue between Science and Theology is twofold. First, it aims to collect high-quality, authoritative, well-documented information on topics placed at the intersection of science and religion. Secondly, it makes an effort to provide a way for leading scholars to share and exchange their views, as well as to comment on the opinions of their peers regarding particular aspects of science and religion. This might include ways to challenge the boundaries within and between religion and science, and or between and within the academy, as well as the boundaries of the sacred and secular, of reason and faith. Ultimately, we want to ask how queer religion, science, and philosophy, can and/or should be.

Early-bird Deadline for paper submission July 1 - August 30

Read more about deadlines

    We invite all researchers, teachers, and students to join this global forum, where research knowledge and ideas can be efficiently presented and shared. The conference provides a smart platform to share your research ideas. Any paper that brings forward a new approach, a research report or a case study, a decent-provocative supposition or a challenging hypothesis is more than welcome into DIALOGO Conference. You will have the pleasure to discuss your findings and ideas with fellow scholars from abroad and the opportunity to publish it into an international, indexed publication!

   The conference is organized by the Research Center on the Dialogue between Science and Theology of „Ovidius” University of Constanta, Romania, in partnership with several academic institutions and research centers from Romania and abroad.  The conference is addressed to scholars from all over the world interested in communicating on topics of interest at the crossroads of science and religion. The participation of young scientists, graduates and students is greatly encouraged, one of the goals of the workshop being to offer the new generation an opportunity to present original new results and a chance to learn from the experience of distinguished researchers.

  DIALOGO Virtual Conference will run continuously from November 3 to 10, 2017 at www.dialogo-conf.com.

www.dialogo-conf.com

13–15 November 2017 Religion and Cultural Shifts: from Axial Age to (Post)Secular Age

Institute for the Study of Religions, Jagiellonian University in Krakow, Kraków, Poland

CALL FOR PAPERS

Keynote speakers:

Gordon M. Burghardt (The University of Tennessee, Knoxville)

Ralph W. Hood (The University of Tennessee, Chattanooga)

Guy G. Stroumsa (Martin Buber Professor Emeritus, The Hebrew University at Jerusalem)

Guido Vanheeswijck (University of Antwerp, University of Leuven)

Understanding different forms of religious life requires taking into consideration wider civilizational background against which religious beliefs and practices make sense. Religion as a vital element of culture not only has inspired great historical shifts but also has been shaped by them in crucial ways. The perfect illustration of this interdependence between religion and other important aspects of culture – political, moral, intellectual – is The Protestant Reformation. During our conference we would like to focus on two major epochal changes – the Axial Age and the Secular Age – and reflect upon both religious sources that underlie them as well as the impact they had on religion itself.

We would like to invite scholars from different areas of study to present their papers in one of the two panels: “The Axial Age” from Jaspers to Bellah and beyond – epochal turns in the history of religions, and “Charles Taylor’s A Secular Age – Ten Years After”.

I) “The Axial Age(s)” from Jaspers to Bellah and Beyond – Deep Cultural Turns in the

History of Religions

The notion of the Axial Age, introduced to the philosophy of history by Karl Jaspers, subsequently was transferred to the historical sociology by S. N. Eisenstadt, who exchanged the singular “axiality” for the plural “multiple axialities”, i.e. different models of civilizational dynamics for different civilizations. This was followed by a revitalization of the axial age notion in comparative studies of civilizations, cultures and religions. Finally, in 2011, Robert Bellah employed the achievements of evolutionary biology, ethology, cognitive science and evolutionary psychology to describe an evolution in methods of transcending sociobiological determinants through the creation of alternative realities from the Paleolithic to the Axial Age. Offering his account of “deep origins” of religion Bellah also drew upon the notion of animal and human “play” (Huizinga, Burghardt).

Our aim is to pose questions about the “axial age”, or rather “axial ages” while linking them with the results of research on changes in the religious and cultural systems that conditioned the emergence of civilizations. Is ‘axiality’ a coherent notion applicable to comparative research practices? Could the notion of axiality serve as a tool facilitating the periodisation of the history of religion within the context of the history of civilisations?

The panel on Axial Age will invite paper presentations dealing with (but not limited to)

the following themes:

  •  “Building blocks” of religion from the perspective of human evolution;
  •  “Deep origins” of ritual and religion: genetic explanations of ritual and the concept of animal and human play;
  • Before/Outside Axial civilizations: dynamics of tribal religions;
  • Specificity of the Axial Age, Axial civilizations and Axial breakthroughs;
  • Axial processes of reconstruction of socio-cultural orders according to transcendental visions;
  •  Axial reflexivity: critical examination of world orders / socio-cosmic orders, creative ideation and pluralism of transcendental visions (religious visions, cultural concepts, political ideologies);
  • Axial pluralism of visions and its consequences: surplus of meaning open to conflicting interpretations, crystallization of orthodoxy and heterodoxy;
  •  Axial broadening of horizons: opening up of potentially universal perspectives in contrast to the particularism of more archaic ethnocentric societies and more archaic modes of though;
  •  Religious elites as carriers of axial visions: from ritual and magical specialists to authority of wisdom (prophets, sages, philosophers, monks, ascetics, mystics);
  • Axial transformations in developments of ancient religions: from mythos to logos, from orthopraxy to orthodoxy, from divination to meditation, from ritual violence to compassion, from religious socialization to privatization of religion, from religion of cosmos to religion of self.

II) Charles Taylor’s A Secular Age – Ten Years After”.

In 2017 it will have been 10 years since Charles Taylor’s remarkable book entitled A Secular Age was published. The book gave rise to a great multidisciplinary debate gathering leading scholars from various fields of study (religious studies, philosophers, sociologists, theologians, historians) and thus became the essential point of reference for anyone interested in the topic of religion and modernity. Considering the paramount importance of this book for a contemporary studies in religion (i.e. the status of religious convictions in a pluralist society, the nature of religious experience, cross-pressures between belief and unbelief) we would like to dedicate this panel to a discussion of the main themes of Taylor’s opus magnum. In particular we would like to focus on topics such as:

  • Notions of the secular, secularization, secularism and the problem of their validity in theoretical accounts of contemporary moral-spiritual condition.
  • Adequacy of Taylor’s approach to Western secularity in the light of proliferation of various conceptions of post-secularity (post-secularism).
  • Taylor’s Reform Master Narrative and its relation to the Löwith-Blumenberg debate about the legitimacy of the modern age.
  • Medieval theologico-philosophical conceptions of the “natural” and the “supernatural” and their consequences for the making of modern “immanent”, “selfsufficient” orders.
  • The “resurgence of religion” in the public spheres of Western societies and the plausibility of Williams James’s take on religion as a matter of individual experience.
  • Theories of modern secularity in the context of new spirituality, individualization of religion, and religious pluralism
  • The inevitability of mythical thinking in a (post)secular age
  • The Axial Age as a historical and conceptual framework for a (post)secular age
  • William James’s critique of the “ethics of belief” (William Clifford) and its relevance for the contemporary debates between believers and unbelievers
  • Religious sources of Western secularity

Scholars of all disciplines are invited to contribute papers that engage with – but are not limited to – the above topics. Papers in English should not exceed 20-25 minutes. Proposals including paper title, abstract (up to 200 words), name, and affiliation of the candidate should be submitted (preferably in .doc, .docx or .pdf format) by 1st May, 2017.

Notification of acceptance: 25th May, 2017.

Please send all abstracts to: religions.confer@gmail.com

Conference fee: 350 PLN or 80 EUR.

http://www.religions.confer.uj.edu.pl/en_GB

14–16 November 2017 The 2nd International Conference of the European Association for Holocaust Studies

Kraków, Poland

Background: 2017 is an important anniversary year as regards the Holocaust. It marks 75 years since the Wannsee conference, Operation Reinhard, and the beginning in 1942 of the systematic mass murder of Jews and others in the death camps established in Nazi-occupied Poland. Auschwitz has become the most widely recognized symbol of the Holocaust: in the popular imagination, images of the railway tracks leading into Birkenau or of ‘Arbeit macht frei’ function as shorthand for the Nazi genocide as a whole. But perhaps less well known, and certainly less symbolized, is the total destruction of Jewish life in thousands of towns and villages that took place in occupied Poland in 1942. At the core of the Holocaust was a horrific, relatively short but intense wave of mass murder in that year: in mid-March 1942, some 75 or 80 per cent of all Holocaust victims were still alive; by mid-February 1943, some 75 or 80 per cent of them were dead. 2017 will also mark 75 years since the beginning of mass gassing operations at Auschwitz-Birkenau, and 70 years since the opening of the Auschwitz-Birkenau State Museum.

Aims: The conference will explore the current state of scholarship on the history and memory of Auschwitz, bringing together scholars working on the history of the camp complex itself, as well as those engaged in broader studies about its memorialization and representation, and the ways in which it has come to function as an icon of the Nazi genocide.

Possible topics for papers might include:

  • Current scholarship on Auschwitz
  • The history of the Auschwitz-Birkenau State Museum
  • Auschwitz as a symbol of the Holocaust and other Nazi genocides
  • Memory of Auschwitz and its memorialization
  • The role of Auschwitz in Holocaust education
  • The image of Auschwitz in literature, art, film and music

As the aim of the EAHS is to provide a forum for cutting-edge Holocaust scholarship and education in Europe, we also welcome papers on any other aspect of Holocaust Studies, particularly from European scholars, educators, and museum professionals.

Those who are interested in presenting a paper (20 minutes) at the conference should send a proposal with title, an abstract of 250–300 words, and a short CV/bio of 100 words.

http://www.israelstudies.eu/2nd-international-conference-european-association-holocaust-studies/

24–25 November 2017 Movement as Immobility - A Conference on Film and Christianity

The University of Lisbon, Portugal

In Simone Weil’s “First and Last Notebooks” we find a note that describes the sea as “a movement within immobility,” the “Image of primal matter”, which leads this Christian philosopher to see music also as a movement that “takes possession of all our soul—and this movement is nothing but immobility”. Perhaps this is an even more fitting description of film, with its images in motion. Its movements can reconnect us with the movements of the world, those motions in which a mysterious sense of order, what Weil calls immobility, arises.

This conference aims at examining the connections between film and Christianity focusing on such aesthetic aspects that, while not rejecting film representations of religious subjects, gives primacy to film style and film experience.

The event is organized by the Centre for Comparative Studies of the University of Lisbon (as part of the research project “Cinema and the World: Studies on Space and Cinema”), to be held at the University of Lisbon, School of Arts and Humanities, on November 24 and 25, 2017.

Relevant topics include, but are not limited to:

- stillness and movement;
- prayer and filmmaking;
- post-secular cinema;
- film and a phenomenology of Christian life;
- film as a personal expression of Christian faith;
- film and Christian spiritual experiences;
- boundaries and commonalities between Christian traditions;
- film and Christian theology;
- Christian cinematic landscapes.

The Conference’s working languages are Portuguese and English.

ABSTRACT SUBMISSIONS
Proposals for twenty-minute papers should include the title of the presentation, a 250 word abstract, and a brief autobiographical statement (circa 200 words). Proposals should be submitted to movementasimmobilitylisbon@gmail.com by June 30, 2017. Participants will receive a response by the end of July.

ORGANIZING COMMITTEE
Filipa Rosário (University of Lisbon)
Rita Benis (University of Lisbon)
Sérgio Dias Branco (University of Coimbra)

KEYNOTE SPEAKERS
Catherine Wheatley (King’s College London)
José Tolentino Mendonça (Catholic University of Portugal - Lisbon)

Contact Email: 

sdiasbranco@fl.uc.pt

http://movementasimmobilitylisbon.blogspot.ch/p/cfp_19.html

27 November 2017 Ecological Theology and Environmental Ethics (ECOTHEE-17)

Orthodox Academy of Crete (OAC), Chania, Greece

CALL FOR PAPERS

We, as humans, are beginning to re-envision ourselves as part of this glorious creation, a member of an Earth community, at the same moment as Earth is entering a severe ecological crisis. This growing crisis leads more and more people to cry out in agony (cf. Psalm 103/104:29).

This conference seeks to engage theology on key ecological concerns from a variety of religious traditions and perspectives. We are interested in multi-disciplinary exchanges and insights, with a focus on religious-based and scientific approaches to ecological problems and challenges. The emphasis is on theological and ethical implications of contributing to a sustainable ecological future. The conference will be a blend of learning and discussion, while attending to the magnificent Earth and cultural context of this region of Crete.

Participants are invited to submit proposals for consideration on the following topics: Please specify your area.

  • THEOLOGY OF OIKOS AND ECO-JUSTICE,
  • CLIMATE CHANGE AND CLIMATE JUSTICE
  • BIODIVERSITY AND LAND DEGRADATION
  • WATER, OCEANS AND ENERGY
  • INSIGHTS FROM COSMOLOGY, EVOLUTION, and LIFE / EARTH SCIENCES
  • GLOBAL ECOLOGICAL RISK, SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT AND CASE STUDIES
  • SPIRITUAL VALUES, FORGIVENESS, ETHICS
  • INDIGENOUS SPIRITUALITY

Presentations can be up to 20 minutes in length, followed by discussion. Please consider participatory and creative styles, panel proposals, workshop, round table or poster sessions. Focus on causal roots and practical solutions for each issue are especially encouraged.

By JUNE 30th 2017 (new deadline), please send a proposal of no more than one page or 250 words to Dr. Louk Andrianos, Chair of ECOTHEE-2017
World Council of Churches

Foundation for Research and Technology Hellas
E-mail: louk.Andrianos@wcc-coe.org
or to
Dr. Jan Willem Sneep, Co-Chair ECOTHEE-2017
Planta Europa Foundation, The Netherlands
E-mail: jwsneep@live.nl

Please include your name, institutional affiliation and contact information.

http://ithe.webs.com/ecothee-2017-call

7–9 December 2017 Chronologics: Periodisation in a Global Context

Maison de France, Berlin

The Berlin-based Forum Transregionale Studien and the Max Weber Stiftung invite submissions for a three-day conference in Berlin on concepts of historical periodisation in transregional perspective. The conference is convened by Thomas Maissen (Deutsches Historisches Institut Paris, DHIP), Barbara Mittler (Heidelberger Centrum für Transkulturelle Studien, HCTS), and Pierre Monnet (Institut franco-allemand de sciences historiques et sociales, Frankfurt am Main). The conference will feature a keynote lecture on December 7th and several topical panel sessions on December 8th and 9th. It is arranged in cooperation with the Einstein Center Chronoi and the Graduate School Global Intellectual History at the Freie Universität Berlin and the Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin.

Application Procedure
This call is open to emerging as well as established scholars on all levels. Abstracts should address themselves to some of the following issues and questions:

  1. The Making of Periodisation Schemes 
  2. Morphologies and Models of Periodisation
  3. Axial Times and Epochal Breaks 
  4. Time and Power: Periodisation in a Global Context
  5. Popular and Pedagogical Dimensions of Periodisation


As the institutions involved have French, German and English as working languages, papers can be held in all of these three languages while the working language at the conference will be English. Abstracts should not exceed 300 words for paper presentations of 20-25 minutes. Please submit, along with a brief biographical statement, to initiatives@trafo-berlin.de by April 30, 2017.
Selection of papers will take place in May, applicants will be informed by the end of May. The Forum Transregionale Studien will cover participants’ travel and accommodation expenses.
Participants invited for presentation will have a version of their paper published online at “Trafo – Blog for Transregional Research” and may have the option to publish their papers in an edited print/open access format as well.
For questions regarding the organisation, please contact Alix Winter:  initiatives@trafo-berlin.de; T: +49 (0)30 89 001-424; F: +49 (0)30 89 001-440.

http://www.ifra-frankfurt.de/artikel/call-papers-chronologics-periodisation-global-context

14–15 December 2017 Approaching Ethnoheterogenesis. Membership, Ethnicity, and Social Change in Contemporary Societies

Institute of Sociology, Leibniz University of Hannover

The aim of the conference is to further develop EHG or other new alternatives as analytical categories for processes of socio-cultural change in complex settings of transnationally constituted societies that can be coined ethnoheterogeneous (Claussen 2013). We invite international scholars for a critical discussion in favor of further theorizing. Conceptual papers and empirical studies referring to the following themes are welcome:

  1. What changes in ethnic framing, ethnic affiliation, and multiplicity of memberships/belongings can be observed in current times of heightened mobility and how can they be analyzed?

- What can be said about ethnicity as a resource for individualization, collectivization, and community building or potential counterhegemonic cultures?
- What forms of “past presencing” can be reconstructed in the processes of ethno(hetero)genesis?
- What does the analysis of the genesis and changes of ethnic framing and multiplicity of memberships add to the broader field of sociology (i.e., Sociology of Migration, Global Sociology, and Sociology of the Nation State)?

  1. How are the processes of (de-)ethnization interwoven with social inequality (economic, legal, political, etc.)?

- What role do institutions such as the family, neighborhoods, work, or communities play in this context?
- How should we think about the genesis of ethnicities in intersection with and relation to different categories of social inequality, and most importantly race, gender, class, and/or generation?

  1. How does ethnicity function as an element in the structuring of (world) society?

- What can be said about the (changing) role of the nation in the emergence of ethnicities and membership roles?
- What is the role of spatial configuration, such as transnationalism, in the genesis of ethnicities?
- What insights can be gained from related fields such as diaspora or transnational studies?

Keynote Speakers:
- Nadje Al-Ali, Centre for Gender Studies, SOAS
- Thomas D. Hall, Prof. Emeritus, Department of History, DePauw University

We are looking forward to proposals for lectures and/or workshops. The abstracts (one page long) should include the question, empirical/theoretical background, hypothesis, and brief personal details.

Please send your proposals or abstracts to: n.tiesler@ish.uni-hannover.de
ABSTRACTS DUE: June 15, 2017

Kontakt

Tiesler

Institut für Soziologie

n.tiesler@ish.uni-hannover.de

http://www.hsozkult.de/event/id/termine-33744

17–18 January 2018 Hate Speech in Korea, Japan, and France: A Comparative Approach

Ritsumeikan University, Japan

In recent years, hatred or instigation of discrimination has increased against foreigners, immigrants or various religious, ethnic and sexual minorities in different developed societies. Hate speech has more and more become a fatal problem to the social, cultural and political life of contemporary democracies. How should democratic societies respond to such persistent problem as well as to the broader forms of “othering” that motivate hate speech? How can we prevent it? It seems to us that neither the cause of nor cure for this pernicious phenomenon is well appreciated in the context of today’s globalized world. Societies in Europe and East Asia present ample occasions for examining the various dimensions of hate speech phenomenon. Many of the cases show that hate speech involves a complex web of historical injustices, economic inequalities, religious tensions, socio-political ideologies and emerging democratic challenges, as well as divergent legal constructions.

This project seeks to illuminate the national, regional and global dynamics of hate speech from diverse viewpoints that include the political, legal, historical, ideological and religio-cultural perspectives. To this end, it focuses on the cases of hate speech in the three countries of Korea, Japan and France. We will examine the contours of hate speech in the Korean, Japanese and French contexts; explore the historical, ideological or religio-cultural background of hate speech production and dissemination in each society that is globalized; and evaluate the cases and provide policy proposals from a human rights perspective. This research project is intended not only to show similarities in this global phenomenon observed beyond the political and geographical boundaries, but also to distinguish differences in the historical, legal and cultural foundation of each nation-state that cause and maintain the expression and structure of the discrimination. The comparative nature of this collaborative research will help fill in blind spots and lead to better informed and more sophisticated and practical recommendations for the prevention of hate speech in many Eastern and Western societies.

We invite paper proposals from different approaches such as communication, media studies, history, sociology, anthropology, political science, legal studies, religious studies that examine, but not restricted to, the following questions:

  • What are the current contours of hate speech in Korea, Japan and France?
  • How can we best respond to the challenges presented by hate speech in ways that promote a just and peaceful society?
  • What are alternative strategies for managing the public sphere against hate speech?
  • How is hate speech defined and delimited in law and public policy in the three societies?
  • What are the differences and similarities in the phenomenon of hate speech between Europe and East Asia?
  • What are the legal and discursive characteristics of Korea, Japan and France in dealing with hate speech?
  • What are the most urgent issues regarding hate speech in Korea, Japan and France?
  • How is mass media, especially the Internet, employed in expressing hatred against different minorities?
  • In what forms do ethnic, sexual or religious differences play a role in provoking hate speech in the three societies?
  • Why do ethnicity, sexuality or religion act as flashpoints in hate speech?

We are pleased to provide presenters with partial subsidies for accommodation and travel expenses depending on funding availability and on participant’s basis. We intend to publish selected papers from the workshop as a journal special issue and/or an edited volume with a reputable academic press. We also plan to hold the second workshop at Université Paris Diderot (Paris 7) in the second half of 2018.

GUIDELINES FOR SUBMISSION

  1. Deadline: Please submit your proposal with a title, an abstract of not more than 500 words and a list of references, together with your name, position, institutional affiliation and email address by June 30, 2017.
  2. Submission method: Send in MS Word via email to hatespeech2018@gmail.com
  3. Final papers: Paper presenters are requested to submit full papers by December 31, 2017.

Please do not hesitate to contact us for any questions regarding this workshop.

Conveners: 
Professor Jaejin LEE, Hanyang University, Korea
Professor Myungkoo KANG, Seoul National University, Korea
Professor Wooja KIM, Ritsumeikan University, Japan
Professor Rivé-Lasan MARIE-ORANGE, Université Paris Diderot, France
Dr. Kyuhoon CHO, Seoul National University, Korea
URL permanente: https://parisconsortium.hypotheses.org/11366

http://www.reseau-etudes-coree.univ-paris-diderot.fr/node-articles/international-workshop-hate-speech-korea-japan-and-france-comparative-approach-june-30

1–3 February 2018 7th International Conference Buddhism & Australia

Perth, Western Australia

7th International Conference Buddhism & Australia
1-3 February, 2018
Perth, Western Australia

Call for Papers and Essays

The Buddhism & Australia invites contributions to the 7th International Conference
Buddhism & Australia that will be held on 1-3 February, 2018 in Perth, Western Australia.

All Buddhists, scholars and members of the general public interested in Buddhism are invited to present their papers in this coming conference. Researchers across a broad range of disciplines are welcomed as well the submission of pre-formed panel proposals

The main themes 2018

  • Rituals
  • Rituals and the Image of Buddha
  • Silk Road Buddhism
  • Death of the Buddha

The organizers are open to proposals for contributions on Buddhist history, philosophy, texts as well for proposals on any related theme.

Important Dates

Deadline for Abstract Submission: 25 October, 2017
Deadline for Full Paper Submission: 25 November, 2017

Those who have prepared for certain big task and who are able to put some sort of idea on certain topics, we have a proposal to compose an essay which needs to create a bridge back to the Buddha. Selected essays will be published on the conference website. Topics:

  • Buddha for every home
  • Buddha versus Jesus
  • Buddhism is in the way of economy
  • Buddhist monks - people with weak vitality and mentality
  • Buddhist cosmology and contemporary astronomy and astrophysics are not brothers
  • Virtual reality as the modern day Nirvana
  • Could Buddha turn on a computer?
  • Is virtual reality beyond our reality or not?
  • Who reads the teachings of the dead Buddha?

Deadline for Essay Submission: 31 December, 2017

Proposals should be submitted to the following email: info@buddhismandaustralia.com
We acknowledge receipt and answer to all proposals submitted.

For detailed information please see here: www.buddhismandaustralia.com

Contact:

Organizing Chair Marju Broder
info@buddhismandaustralia.com
tel. +61 0 405549923
www.buddhismandaustralia.com

 

http://www.buddhismandaustralia.com/ba/index.php/Buddhism_%26_Australia

1–4 March 2018 Religion and Politics in Early America (Beginnings to 1820)

Washington University in St. Louis, USA

CFP – Religion and Politics in Early America (Beginnings to 1820)

St. Louis, March 1-4, 2018

Sponsored by:

The Danforth Center on Religion and Politics
The Kinder Institute on Constitutional Democracy
The Society of Early Americanists
St. Louis University
Washington University in St. Louis

Seeking Panel and Paper Proposals

We seek proposals for panels and individual papers for the special topics conference on Religion and Politics in Early America, March 1-4, 2018, in St. Louis, Missouri. Individual papers are welcome, but preference will be given to completed panel submissions.

This conference will explore the intersections between religion and politics in early America from pre-contact through the early republic. All topics related to the way religion shapes politics or politics shapes religion—how the two conflict, collaborate, or otherwise configure each other—will be welcomed. We define the terms “religion” and “politics” broadly, including (for example) studies of secularity and doubt. This conference will have a broad temporal, geographic, and topical expanse. We intend to create a space for interdisciplinary conversation, though this does not mean that all panels will need be composed of multiple disciplines; we welcome both mixed panels and panels composed entirely of scholars from a single discipline.

Panels can take a traditional form (3-4 papers, with or without a respondent), roundtable form (5 or more brief statements with discussion), or other forms.

Panel submissions must have the following:

  1. An organizer for contact information
  2. Names and titles for each paper in the panel.
  3. A brief abstract (no more than 250 words) for the panel.
  4. A briefer abstract (no more than 100 words) for each paper.
  5. Brief CV’s for each participant (no more than two pages each).

Individual paper submissions must include the following:

  1. Name and contact information
  2. Title
  3. Abstract (no more than 150 words)
  4. A brief CV (no more than two pages)

Please send your proposals to religion.politics.2018@gmail.com by Friday, May 26, 2017.

If you have any questions, please email Abram Van Engen at religion.politics.2018@gmail.com.

https://sites.wustl.edu/religionpolitics2018/call-for-papers/

1–3 March 2018 93rd Annual Meeting of the Medieval Academy of America

Emory University, Atlanta, USA

Themes:

1. Representing the Mysteries of Faith in Art, Liturgy, and Devotion

2. The Religious Orders: Diffusion of Artistic and Religious Practices between Monastery and City
3. The Medieval Artes and their Books
4. The Long Fourteenth Century
5. Transconfessional Spaces in Andalusi Cities
6. Umayyad Córdoba and Nasrid Granada: Poetry, Philosophy, and Architecture
7. Restoring Medieval Buildings: Gains, Problems, and Technologies     
8. Materiality of Medieval Objects: What Now?
9. Monumental Narratives: Bayeux and Beyond
10. Legal History of Landholding and Property      

11. New Medieval Economic Institutions
12. Legacy of Rome: Legal, Literary, and Artistic   
13. Migration, Movement, and Slavery        
14. Female Spirituality and Mysticism
15. Bible Translation and Reform Movements

16. Medieval Cosmographies and Geographies
17. Trade and Material Culture in the Mediterranean
18. Chaucer and the Poets
19. Anglo-Saxon Objects and Spaces, Poems and Places
20.
Faith and Inquiry: Exegesis, Speculative Theology, and Normative Argument
21. Faith and Culture: Devotional Practices, Symbolism, and Lived Religion
22. Transgressing “Isms”: Platonism, Aristotelianism, Stoicism . . .
23. Comparative Kingship from the Carolingians to 1300
24. Truth, “Truthiness,” and Falsehood in Documentary Practice

http://www.medievalacademy.org/?page=2018Meeting

8–10 March 2018 Biennial New College Conference on Medieval and Renaissance Studies

Sudakoff Conference Center, New College of Florida, USA

The twenty-first biennial New College Conference on Medieval and Renaissance Studies will take place 8–10 March 2018 in Sarasota, Florida. The program committee invites 250-word abstracts of proposed twenty-minute papers on topics in European and Mediterranean history, literature, art, music and religion from the fourth to the seventeenth centuries. Interdisciplinary work is particularly appropriate to the conference’s broad historical and disciplinary scope. Planned sessions are also welcome. The deadline for all abstracts is 15 September 2017; please see the submission guidelines below.

Junior scholars whose abstracts are accepted are encouraged to submit their papers for consideration for the Snyder Prize (named in honor of conference founder Lee Snyder), which carries an honorarium of $400. Please click "Snyder Prize" in the sidebar at left for further information.

More information will be posted here on the conference website as it becomes available, including information about plenary speakers, conference events, and area attractions. Please send any inquiries to info@newcollegeconference.org.

 

PLEASE SHARE THIS ANNOUNCEMENT WITH INTERESTED COLLEAGUES.

 

***

 

Abstract Submission Guidelines:

 

If you are considering submitting an abstract or session proposal, please be aware of the following:

1) So that we can accommodate as many scholars as possible, no one may present a paper in more than one session of the conference. Furthermore, no one should commit to more than two out of the following three activities: 1) presenting a paper; 2) chairing a session; and 3) participating in a roundtable. Organizing sessions does not count in these calculations, but session organizers are subject to them along with everyone else (i.e. you may organize as many sessions as you like, but you may only present one paper, and chair a separate session).

2) Session chairs should not also present in the panel they are chairing. Session organizers may either chair or present in a panel that they have arranged, but not both. If you are organizing a planned session, you may either arrange for a chair and include him/her in your proposal, or submit your panel without a chair and conference organizers will assign one. (The acceptance of your panel will not depend on whether or not your planned session already has a chair.)

3) Those organizing planned sessions should also know that the organizing committee strongly prefers sessions that include participants from more than one institution.

Please click here to submit your abstract,

or click here to download a printable PDF of this Call for Papers.

Please email info@newcollegeconference.org with any questions.

http://www.newcollegeconference.org/cfp

5–7 April 2018 Sacred Sites/Sacred Stories: Global Perspectives

ANU College of Asia & the Pacific, The Australian National University, Canberra, ACT, Australia

Call for Papers

                              ANU Religion Conference 2018

                   Theme: Sacred Sites/Sacred Stories: Global Perspectives

                    05-07 April 2018, ANU College of Asia & the Pacific, 
           The Australian National University, Canberra, ACT, Australia
                      Abstract Deadline: 15 October 2017

The study of sacred sites is a prominent feature in a number of disciplines. Sacred sites and stories and pilgrimage are the theme of the conference. Topics of enquiry range from the role of sacred sites in religious traditions, through to how sacred sites form part of the development of modern tourist industries, the role of sacred sites in international relations and the ways in which sacred sites can be the focus for disputes. At a time when many sacred sites and their stories face challenges due to economic development, environmental change and the impact of mass pilgrimage and tourism the conference offers an opportunity for wide-ranging discussions of the past, present and future of sacred sites and stories and their significance in the world today.
  

The conference will have the following panels:
•    Pilgrimage and Tourism
•    Historical Perspectives
•    Visual Arts and Architecture
•    Indigenous Traditions
•    Competition and Contestation

We welcome proposals for paper presentations that address the theme of one of these panels. Individual papers that are relevant to the main theme but are not aligned with any of the proposed panel streams will also be considered for presentation. 

  •  Panel Proposals. While proposals for individual papers are welcome, applicants are also encouraged to collaborate with peers to propose panels of 3-4 papers that converge on a particular theme.

In view of the major role that Australia and the Asia Pacific region plays in national and international discussions about sacred sites and sacred stories we particularly welcome panels on Asian, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander and Pacific perspectives on sacred sites. We also welcome papers covering a range of time frames, from pre-history to the contemporary era, and from all traditions and locations.

If you are interested, please send your abstract (150 words), including a note of which stream your proposal addresses, and bio (80 words) to the following email (davidwj_kim@yahoo.co.uk). The conference fee is AU$350, but for masters students, doctoral candidates and early career researchers who do not have full-time positions the fee will be AU$250. The conference cost includes registration fee, conference dinner and refreshments. The two best papers submitted by HDR students will be awarded (AU$500 each). To be considered for this award, the full paper must be submitted at least one month before the conference (by 07 March 2018). There will be a limited number of bursaries available for some accepted masters students, doctoral candidates and early career researchers. Please note that those selected to receive bursaries will be informed of this before the conference but the bursaries will not be dispersed until the papers have been presented at the conference. In addition, selected papers may be considered for publication in a book volume.

Contacts:
Dr David W. Kim (Australian National University)
Email: davidwj_kim@yahoo.co.uk

Dr Peter Friedlander (Australian National University)
Email: peter.friedlander@anu.edu.au

A/Prof McComas Taylor (Australian National University)
Email: mccomas.taylor@anu.edu.au

Dr Barbara Nelson (Australian National University)
Email: barbara.nelson@anu.edu.au

http://www.anu.edu.au/events/sacred-sitessacred-stories-global-perspectives

6–8 April 2018 Mindful Connectivity: Asian Perspectives and Influences

Sonesta Hotel, Philadelphia, PA

The 2018 ASIANetwork Conference theme focuses on mindfulness and connectivity in relation to contemporary social change, recurrent values and practices, and holistic understandings of self, society, and environment. Mindfulness has a long association with contemplative traditions and teachings, but it also has re-framed material culture studies—of food, apparel, architecture, etc.—by directing attention toward community spirit, aesthetic experience, and embedded values.

Presenters are encouraged to focus on questions like the following: 

  • How can studies in commerce, technology, health, natural science, the arts, social and political enterprises, and the environment intersect with emphases on mindfulness and connectivity?
  • Does an emphasis on mindfulness and connectivity contribute to social and environmental justice?
  • How do interests in mindfulness and connectivity intersect with studies of cultural appropriation, hybridization, and authenticity?
  • How is mindfulness part of sociocultural change in the wake of globalization, including cases of post-material cultural incongruity?
  • How do recent breakthroughs in neurobiology intersect with traditional Asian views of the “relational” nature of mind—the interconnecting of one’s mind to all others including non-sentient beings and energies?
  • How do Asian views of mind and interconnectedness enhance or challenge post-modern views of reality, truth, values, history and meaning as “constructed”? 
  • How do contemplative pedagogy and mindful forms of connectivity inform undergraduate Asian Studies curricula and pedagogy?

http://www.asianetwork.org/2017/05/2018-conference-theme/

13–14 June 2018 DOWN TOWN / DOWN SOUL Early Modern Mysticism & The Political

Radboud University, Nijmegen, The Netherlands

In the beginning of the seventeenth century, René Descartes coined the human Self as man’s unique source of certainty beyond any possible doubt. This was, according to many, the birth of Modernity and the modern subject. Yet, that same century was not without counter-movements putting this self-assured subject thoroughly into question. One of those movements was the mystical wave that went over France and Western Europe. The so-called ‘spirituality of the inner life’ (‘spiritualité de la vie intérieure’) was as much focussed on the human Self as Descartes was, but not in order to establish its self-assured position, but to analyse the position of that newly acquired modern Self and to lay bare the abyss on which it was built. In this spiritual literature we find a genuine “science of the subject” or “anatomy of the soul”. To the construction of the modern subject, these authors added, so to speak, its ‘deconstruction’. In a paradigmatic way this movement shows how modernity is bound to theories and formations of subjectivity in an era marked by confessionalisation and the emergence of a variety of models for piety and faith in different contexts – France, Spain, England, Germany, the Low Countries.

This construction/deconstruction of the modern subject that took place in the milieus of early modern mysticism was not without a socio-political dimension. It had an impact on both the way the citizen understood himself as subject of the new political order, and the way political power understood itself. The struggle in and with the individual’s inner Self resonates in the political struggle in which the individual citizen establishes his Self within a state which conceived itself as a Self as well. The inner struggle of the early modern mystical Self must be examined in its relation to the struggle in the heart of the political Self.

The Titus Brandsma Institute is a Research Center for Christian Spirituality and Mysticism. In 2018 it celebrates its 50th anniversary. One of the events that year is a two-day international conference, entitled “Down Town / Down Soul: Early Modern Mysticism and the Political”, organized by the Titus Brandsma Insitute, in collaboration with the Oblate School for Theology San Antonio, Texas, US. The conference will take place at the Radboud University, Nijmegen, The Netherlands, on Wednesday 13 and Thursday 14 June 2018.

            The theme of the conference is twofold:

  1. The impact of early modern mysticism on the formation of the modern subject: In what sense can the “science of the subject”, present in early modern ‘spiritualité’ authors, be read as ‘deconstructing’ the upcoming modern subject?
  2. The relation of early modern mysticism to the politics of its time; and, more specifically, the influence of the early modern mystical subject on the emerging political subject, and vice versa.

Proposals (max. 300 words) and short CV can be sent to Marc De Kesel (Marc.deKesel@titusbrandsmainstituut.nl) before November 30th, 2017.

 

http://wp.titusbrandsmainstituut.nl/nl/?page_id=5123

15–21 July 2018 Religion, Power, and Resistance: New Ideas for a Divided World

Metro Toronto Convention Center, Toronto, ON, Canada

Current environmental, economic, social, and political challenges indicate that people are losing faith in existing power structures and mechanisms for coping with crises. This creates increasingly divided societies, riven by ideological battles for the future of the human and the more than human world. Religion has a place in this picture. Not only is it often a source of divisions; it can also be a source for alternative means of addressing them.

These divisions take new and as yet unclear shapes, which sociologists are only now beginning to comprehend. It is not enough to refer to the struggle between ‘tradition’ and ‘modernity’, terms that dominated sociology through the 1970s. Nor do the tropes ‘colonialism vs. anti-colonialism’ and the ‘clash of civilizations’ adequately explain what is going on. Nor, arguably, does ‘populism vs neo-liberalism’ fully capture such things as the recent clashes between cosmopolitan and anticosmopolitan actors in the major Western democracies. Each of these has a piece of the picture; none of them captures it all.

What is religion’s role in this situation: as a creator of divisions, as a locus of power, and as a ground of resistance?  How does religion influence our divided societies? How is religion influenced in turn?

We invite proposals for RC22 sessions that focus on religion, power, intersectional violence, and social divisions, and also resistance to power, violence, and division. We encourage sessions that explore the nexus between:

  •     religion and global capitalism;
  •     religion and colonialism;
  •     religion and nationalism;
  •     religion and racism;
  •     religion and violent extremism;
  •     religion and gender inequality;
  •     religion and sexuality inequality;
  •     religion and environmental crises;
  •     religion and resistance to power and violence; and
  •     other topics that speak to religion’s role in a divided world.

We particularly encourage a focus on new ideas. We thus encourage sessions on:

  •     post-colonial, Southern and Eastern social theories;
  •     gender and sexuality equality;
  •     violent and nonviolent social movements;
  •     human rights and peacebuilding;
  •     third spaces, digital activism, and other new phenomena.

Program Coordinators:

  •     Anna Halafoff, Deakin University, Australia
  •     Sam Han, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore
  •     Caroline Starkey, University of Leeds, UK

The ISA CONFEX website site will be open to session proposals between 2 February and 15 March, 2017 24:00 GMT. We welcome both pre-organized sessions and topical sessions that will be open to paper proposals by individuals. Once the sessions are chosen, individuals will have an opportunity to propose individual papers for those sessions: from April 25 to September 30, 2017 24:00 GMT, also at the CONFEX website.

Read more at: International Sociological Association (ISA)

http://www.iric.org/tabid/99/articleType/ArticleView/articleId/867/Religion-Power-and-Resistance-New-Ideas-for-a-Divided-World.aspx

28–30 August 2017 The Making of Peace, Conflict and Security Dynamics of Inclusion and Exclusion

Amsterdam, The Netherlands

The call for papers for the 6th bi-annual PACSA meeting in Amsterdam is now open. Individual researchers are invited to submit abstracts of about 250 words, indicating which of the panels listed below they would like to join. A detailed overview of the panels
and a full description of the theme can be found on the conference website.

Conference theme
Conflict and peace-making have fundamentally shaped and remade boundaries and relationships in the world we live in. These transformations include processes of inclusion and exclusion that accompany conflicts and the efforts to resolve, transform or
secure them. Boundaries, borders and relationships are frequently reified, contested or hardened through these processes. In this sense, both conflict and peace are interrelated ordering principles at the heart of which lie questions about inclusion and exclusion,
relation and disconnection. In particular, security and forms of securitisation, as part of major ordering mechanisms, play a key role here. In the name of security, freedom is protected, borders are militarised and interventions justified, often in ahistorical, depoliticised ways. Questions about inclusion/exclusion are central to our understanding about how dynamics of peace, conflict and security interrelate.

Submit
We encourage paper submissions to relate to these conceptual underpinnings, while also indicating clearly which of the panels the paper should be considered for. In order to submit a paper, please send your abstract to pacsa2017@gmail.com
The deadline for paper submissions is Sunday 2 April, 2017.

The summit is organised in cooperation with the Anthropology of Security Network SECURCIT at the University of Amsterdam and the Dept. of Anthropology at VU University Amsterdam.

Panels
1. Shaping Inclusive Political Settlements: Critical Approaches to International Peacebuilding
2. Ethnographic Explorations of Heterogeneity, Representation and Legitimacy in the Colombian
Peace Process
3. Refugees Welcome? The politics of hospitality and care in Turkey and Europe
4. The making of war veterans: Analyzing the construction of a (post)war category
5. Security Provision and Citizenship: Privatization, Pluralization and Differentiation
6. Extra-Judicial Killings in a post-Human Rights era
7. Vigilantism and security in development
8. Public Events of Securitization; Public Events and Securitization
9. Security Assemblages in Urban Environments
10. Opposing Violence
11. Old wounds, new violence: How memory and anticipation affect boundary-making and
exclusion in emerging crisis
12. Securitizing Infrastructure(s)
13. Urban policing and practices of b/ordering
14. Landscapes of Sovereignty: Everyday Life at the Margins of the State
15. Violent exchange and urban citizenship: transcending political and economic anthropology
in conflict studies
16. Securitisation and the techno-politics of transition
17. South-South-Cooperation in Contemporary Peacekeeping
18. The radical – hero or frightening other?
19. Border practices of inclusion and exclusion
20. The Politics of Critical Security Research
21. Sacralizing Security: Postsecular Pathways of Religion, Violence and Protection

For full panel listings please visit the conference website
http://www.pacsa-web.eu/pasca-meeting-2017-amsterdam/

http://www.pacsa-web.eu/pasca-meeting-2017-amsterdam/

13–14 October 2017 Numa, Numa: The Life and Afterlife of the Second King of Rome

University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, USA

Organizers: Celia E. Schultz (University of Michigan) and Mark R. Silk (Trinity College)

This conference aims to help correct modern scholarship’s oversight of the second king of Rome, Numa Pompilius – the foundational figure of Roman religion who also enjoyed a remarkably long, varied, and rich nachleben in Western thought, literature, and art. From the first century BCE into the nineteenth century, Numa personified the good monarch and emblemized how religion should (or, in the case of early Latin Christian intellectuals, should not) function in society. His paramour, the divine nymph Egeria, became the ideal for a male leader’s female helpmeet and advisor.  Numa appears in genres as disparate as Italian Renaissance and early modern French works on political theory; at least two seventeenth-century operas; paintings by Poussin and Lorain; poems by Milton, Byron, and Tennyson; letters of John Adams; a late eighteenth-century novel by the French writer J.P.C. de Florian, and the important nineteenth-century Icelandic poem, Numa Rimur. We hope to attract papers representing the fields of Classics, Comparative Literature, History, Political Science, Religion, Art History, and Music.

The conference will held at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor on 13-14 October, 2017.

Among the subjects the conference will address are:

  1. The light Numa’s biography sheds on early Italic religion.
  2. Numa as a model of the good Roman emperor.
  3. Numa the bête noir of the Latin church fathers.
  4. How medieval and Renaissance humanists rehabilitated Numa as the father of civil religion.
  5. The use of Numa to criticize Christianity in the republican tradition.
  6. Numa as an exemplar for the papacy in the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries and for Enlightenment monarchy.
  7. The liaison of Numa and Egeria in art, poetry, and fiction.

We invite abstracts (500 words) for papers that will last 25 minutes.  Abstracts should to be sent as email attachments to the conference account (numanumaconference@umich.edu) by 15 February, 2017.  Notifications will be sent out no later than 15 March, 2017.

Confirmed speakers are Christopher Smith (British School at Rome), John J. Martin (History, Duke University), F. Jackson Bryce (Classics, Carleton College), Arelene Saxonhouse (Political Science, University of Michigan), Sara Ahbel-Rappe (Classical Studies, University of Michigan), Parrish Wright (Interdepartmental Program in Greek and Roman History, University of Michigan), Celia Schultz (Classical Studies, University of Michigan), Mark Silk (Religion, Trinity College), Jean-Marc Kehres (Language and Culture Studies, Trinity College)

https://classicalstudies.org/scs-news/call-papers-numa-numa-life-and-afterlife-second-king-rome

13–14 October 2017 Understanding and Misunderstanding between the Far East and the West

University of Glasgow, UK

Understanding and Misunderstanding between the Far East and the West
Conference on East Asian studies in Remembrance of 210th Anniversary of Dr. Rev. Robert Morrison’s Arrival at China

13–14th October 2017, University of Glasgow
Deadline: 1st May 2017

Robert Morrison, the first Protestant missionary to China and the Far East, had contribution not only to the evangelisation, but also the study of East Asian studies and even the modernisation of Far East. When Protestant, Catholic and Orthodox missionaries had freer entrance to China (from 1842 to 1949), Japan and Korea, transcultural communication was strengthened, which resulted in not only understanding but also misunderstanding. How do such understanding and misunderstanding affect the West and the Far East in 19th and 20th century? This inter-disciplinary conference aims to explore the question in different aspects so to acknowledge and recognise the academic contributions by the Christian missionaries in the Far East in the 210th anniversary of Dr. Rev. Robert Morrison’s arrival at China.

http://www.gla.ac.uk/events/conferences/?action=details&id=10409

16–18 November 2017 SENSORIUM: Sensory Perceptions in the Roman Religion

Madrid, Spain

he Institute of Historiography “Julio Caro Baroja”, at the University of Carlos III of Madrid is organizing an international conference titled, “SENSORIUM: Sensory Perceptions in the Roman Religion.” Researchers of ancient history, religious history, archeology, anthropology, classical literature, and other related disciplines, are invited to present their research relating to the poly-sensorial practice of religion in the Roman world.

Paper presentations should be approximately 20 minutes in length and can be delivered in Spanish, English, German, French, or Italian. We encourage the use of English to make easier the communication. All the papers will be published in English. The contributions must be original works not previously published. Interested speakers should send an abstract of their proposal (200-300 words), a short curriculum vitae, and contact information before April 30, 2017, to the following address: SENSORIUM@uc3m.es

Please, find attached the call for papers (here: 2017-sensorium-intro-english-cfp), which explains in detail the topic of the conference and lists the keynote speakers.

https://sensorystudiesinantiquity.com/2017/02/15/cfp-sensorium-sensory-perceptions-in-the-roman-religion-madrid-16-18-november-2017/

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