Next Issue
Previous Issue

Table of Contents

Future Internet, Volume 4, Issue 1 (March 2012), Pages 1-361

  • Issues are regarded as officially published after their release is announced to the table of contents alert mailing list.
  • You may sign up for e-mail alerts to receive table of contents of newly released issues.
  • PDF is the official format for papers published in both, html and pdf forms. To view the papers in pdf format, click on the "PDF Full-text" link, and use the free Adobe Readerexternal link to open them.
View options order results:
result details:
Displaying articles 1-18
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Other

Open AccessArticle The Street Network Evolution of Crowdsourced Maps: OpenStreetMap in Germany 2007–2011
Future Internet 2012, 4(1), 1-21; doi:10.3390/fi4010001
Received: 1 December 2011 / Revised: 16 December 2011 / Accepted: 19 December 2011 / Published: 29 December 2011
Cited by 71 | PDF Full-text (890 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The OpenStreetMap (OSM) project is a prime example in the field of Volunteered Geographic Information (VGI). Worldwide, several hundred thousand people are currently contributing information to the “free” geodatabase. However, the data contributions show a geographically heterogeneous pattern around the globe. Germany [...] Read more.
The OpenStreetMap (OSM) project is a prime example in the field of Volunteered Geographic Information (VGI). Worldwide, several hundred thousand people are currently contributing information to the “free” geodatabase. However, the data contributions show a geographically heterogeneous pattern around the globe. Germany counts as one of the most active countries in OSM; thus, the German street network has undergone an extensive development in recent years. The question that remains is this: How does the street network perform in a relative comparison with a commercial dataset? By means of a variety of studies, we show that the difference between the OSM street network for car navigation in Germany and a comparable proprietary dataset was only 9% in June 2011. The results of our analysis regarding the entire street network showed that OSM even exceeds the information provided by the proprietary dataset by 27%. Further analyses show on what scale errors can be reckoned with in the topology of the street network, and the completeness of turn restrictions and street name information. In addition to the analyses conducted over the past few years, projections have additionally been made about the point in time by which the OSM dataset for Germany can be considered “complete” in relative comparison to a commercial dataset. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue NeoGeography and WikiPlanning)
Figures

Open AccessArticle How Can We Study Learning with Geovisual Analytics Applied to Statistics?
Future Internet 2012, 4(1), 22-41; doi:10.3390/fi4010022
Received: 21 November 2011 / Revised: 13 December 2011 / Accepted: 19 December 2011 / Published: 30 December 2011
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (1431 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
It is vital to understand what kind of processes for learning that Geovisual Analytics creates, as certain activities and conditions are produced when employing Geovisual Anlytic tools in education. To understand learning processes created by Geovisual Analytics, first requires an understanding of [...] Read more.
It is vital to understand what kind of processes for learning that Geovisual Analytics creates, as certain activities and conditions are produced when employing Geovisual Anlytic tools in education. To understand learning processes created by Geovisual Analytics, first requires an understanding of the interactions between the technology, the workplace where the learning takes place, and learners’ specific knowledge formation. When studying these types of interaction it demands a most critical consideration from theoretical perspectives on research design and methods. This paper first discusses common, and then a more uncommon, theoretical approach used within the fields of learning with multimedia environments and Geovisual Analytics, the socio-cultural theoretical perspective. The paper next advocates this constructivist theoretical and empirical perspective when studying learning with multiple representational Geovisual Analytic tools. To illustrate, an outline of a study made within this theoretical tradition is offered. The study is conducted in an educational setting where the Open Statistics eXplorer platform is used. Discussion of our study results shows that the socio-cultural perspective has much to offer in terms of what kind of understanding can be reached in conducting this kind of studies. Therefore, we argue that empirical research to analyze how specific communities use various Geovisual Analytics to evaluate information is best positioned in a socio-cultural theoretical perspective. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Geovisual Analytics)
Open AccessArticle Extension Activity Support System (EASY): A Web-Based Prototype for Facilitating Farm Management
Future Internet 2012, 4(1), 42-64; doi:10.3390/fi4010042
Received: 4 November 2011 / Revised: 27 December 2011 / Accepted: 27 December 2011 / Published: 4 January 2012
PDF Full-text (730 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
In response to disparate advances in delivering spatial information to support agricultural extension activities, the Extension Activity Support System (EASY) project was established to develop a vision statement and conceptual design for such a system based on a national needs assessment. Personnel [...] Read more.
In response to disparate advances in delivering spatial information to support agricultural extension activities, the Extension Activity Support System (EASY) project was established to develop a vision statement and conceptual design for such a system based on a national needs assessment. Personnel from across Australia were consulted and a review of existing farm information/management software undertaken to ensure that any system that is eventually produced from the EASY vision will build on the strengths of existing efforts. This paper reports on the collaborative consultative process undertaken to create the EASY vision as well as the conceptual technical design and business models that could support a fully functional spatially enabled online system. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Internet and Landscapes)
Open AccessArticle A Land Use Planning Ontology: LBCS
Future Internet 2012, 4(1), 65-82; doi:10.3390/fi4010065
Received: 30 November 2011 / Revised: 28 December 2011 / Accepted: 30 December 2011 / Published: 6 January 2012
Cited by 4 | PDF Full-text (490 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Urban planning has a considerable impact on the economic performance of cities and on the quality of life of their populations. Efficiency at this level has been hampered by the lack of integrated tools to adequately describe urban space in order to [...] Read more.
Urban planning has a considerable impact on the economic performance of cities and on the quality of life of their populations. Efficiency at this level has been hampered by the lack of integrated tools to adequately describe urban space in order to formulate appropriate design solutions. This paper describes an ontology called LBCS-OWL2 specifically developed to overcome this flaw, based on the Land Based Classification Standards (LBCS), a comprehensive and detailed land use standard to describe the different dimensions of urban space. The goal is to provide semantic and computer-readable land use descriptions of geo-referenced spatial data. This will help to make programming strategies available to those involved in the urban development process. There are several advantages to transferring a land use standard to an OWL2 land use ontology: it is modular, it can be shared and reused, it can be extended and data consistency maintained, and it is ready for integration, thereby supporting the interoperability of different urban planning applications. This standard is used as a basic structure for the “City Information Modelling” (CIM) model developed within a larger research project called City Induction, which aims to develop a tool for urban planning and design. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue NeoGeography and WikiPlanning)
Open AccessArticle Web Service Assurance: The Notion and the Issues
Future Internet 2012, 4(1), 92-109; doi:10.3390/fi4010092
Received: 21 December 2011 / Revised: 16 January 2012 / Accepted: 3 February 2012 / Published: 14 February 2012
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (509 KB)
Abstract
Web service technology provides basic infrastructure for deploying collaborative business processes. Web Service security standards and protocols aim to provide secure communication and conversation between service providers and consumers. Still, for a client calling a Web service it is difficult to ascertain [...] Read more.
Web service technology provides basic infrastructure for deploying collaborative business processes. Web Service security standards and protocols aim to provide secure communication and conversation between service providers and consumers. Still, for a client calling a Web service it is difficult to ascertain that a particular service instance satisfies—at execution time—specific non-functional properties. In this paper we introduce the notion of certified Web service assurance, characterizing how service consumers can specify the set of security properties that a service should satisfy. Also, we illustrate a mechanism to re-check non-functional properties when the execution context changes. To this end, we introduce the concept of context-aware certificate, and describe a dynamic, context-aware service discovery environment. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Advances in Web Services)
Open AccessArticle Pattern-Based Development and Management of Cloud Applications
Future Internet 2012, 4(1), 110-141; doi:10.3390/fi4010110
Received: 28 November 2011 / Revised: 18 January 2012 / Accepted: 3 February 2012 / Published: 15 February 2012
Cited by 11 | PDF Full-text (509 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Cloud-based applications require a high degree of automation regarding their IT resource management, for example, to handle scalability or resource failures. This automation is enabled by cloud providers offering management interfaces accessed by applications without human interaction. The properties of clouds, especially [...] Read more.
Cloud-based applications require a high degree of automation regarding their IT resource management, for example, to handle scalability or resource failures. This automation is enabled by cloud providers offering management interfaces accessed by applications without human interaction. The properties of clouds, especially pay-per-use billing and low availability of individual resources, demand such a timely system management. We call the automated steps to perform one of these management tasks a “management flow”. Because the emerging behavior of the overall system is comprised of many such management flows and is often hard to predict, we propose defining abstract management flows, describing common steps handling the management tasks. These abstract management flows may then be refined for each individual use case. We cover abstract management flows describing how to make an application elastic, resilient regarding IT resource failure, and how to move application components between different runtime environments. The requirements of these management flows for handled applications are expressed using architectural patterns that have to be implemented by the applications. These dependencies result in abstract management flows being interrelated with architectural patterns in a uniform pattern catalog. We propose a method by use of a catalog to guide application managers during the refinement of abstract management flows at the design stage of an application. Following this method, runtime-specific management functionality and management interfaces are used to obtain automated management flows for a developed application. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Advances in Web Services)
Open AccessArticle The Player as Author: Exploring the Effects of Mobile Gaming and the Location-Aware Interface on Storytelling
Future Internet 2012, 4(1), 142-160; doi:10.3390/fi4010142
Received: 17 November 2011 / Revised: 1 February 2012 / Accepted: 13 February 2012 / Published: 17 February 2012
Cited by 3 | PDF Full-text (219 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The mobile internet expands the immersive potential of storytelling by introducing electronic games powered by portable, location-aware interfaces. Mobile gaming has become the latest iteration in a decades-long evolution of electronic games that seek to empower the player not just as an [...] Read more.
The mobile internet expands the immersive potential of storytelling by introducing electronic games powered by portable, location-aware interfaces. Mobile gaming has become the latest iteration in a decades-long evolution of electronic games that seek to empower the player not just as an avatar in a gameworld but also as a co-author of that gameworld, alongside the game’s original designers. Location-aware interfaces allow players to implicate places in the physical world as part of their gameworld (and vice versa) for the first time. In addition to empowering the player as a co-author in the process of constructing a compelling gameworld, then, mobile games eschew linear narrative structures in favor of a cooperative storytelling process that is reliant in part on the player’s experience of place. While such an author-player “worldmaking” approach to storytelling is not new, mobile games evolve the process beyond what has yet been possible within the technical and physical constraints of the traditional video gaming format. Location-aware interfaces allow mobile games to extend the worldmaking process beyond the screen and into the physical world, co-opting the player’s sensory experiences of real-world places as potential storytelling tools. In our essay, we theorize the unique storytelling potential of mobile games while describing our experience attempting to harness that potential through the design and implementation of our hybrid-reality game University of Death. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Social Transformations from the Mobile Internet)
Open AccessArticle Sensing the News: User Experiences when Reading Locative News
Future Internet 2012, 4(1), 161-178; doi:10.3390/fi4010161
Received: 24 November 2011 / Revised: 16 January 2012 / Accepted: 13 February 2012 / Published: 21 February 2012
Cited by 6 | PDF Full-text (415 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
This article focuses on user experiences on reading location-aware news on the mobile platform and aims to explore what experiences this kind of locative journalism generates and how such experiences change the users’ social interaction with news. We produced a specially designed [...] Read more.
This article focuses on user experiences on reading location-aware news on the mobile platform and aims to explore what experiences this kind of locative journalism generates and how such experiences change the users’ social interaction with news. We produced a specially designed mobile application and tailored news stories specific to this project called LocaNews in order to explore participants’ relation to the content in this journalistic format. The result is generated through a field study and a questionnaire of 32 people to find out how they experience the news presented in this format. The user participants’ responses are analyzed based on their news experiences, contextualizing places and their social interaction with the news within this form of journalism. Results showed that the local, semi-local and non-local user approaches the locative news in a different manner, but that the average user found this kind of news more interesting and more informative than ordinary news. The participants also have a problem identifying this as journalism, rather than an information service. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Social Transformations from the Mobile Internet)
Open AccessArticle A Flexible Object-of-Interest Annotation Framework for Online Video Portals
Future Internet 2012, 4(1), 179-215; doi:10.3390/fi4010179
Received: 23 November 2011 / Revised: 2 February 2012 / Accepted: 20 February 2012 / Published: 22 February 2012
PDF Full-text (1164 KB)
Abstract
In this work, we address the use of object recognition techniques to annotate what is shown where in online video collections. These annotations are suitable to retrieve specific video scenes for object related text queries which is not possible with the manually [...] Read more.
In this work, we address the use of object recognition techniques to annotate what is shown where in online video collections. These annotations are suitable to retrieve specific video scenes for object related text queries which is not possible with the manually generated metadata that is used by current portals. We are not the first to present object annotations that are generated with content-based analysis methods. However, the proposed framework possesses some outstanding features that offer good prospects for its application in real video portals. Firstly, it can be easily used as background module in any video environment. Secondly, it is not based on a fixed analysis chain but on an extensive recognition infrastructure that can be used with all kinds of visual features, matching and machine learning techniques. New recognition approaches can be integrated into this infrastructure with low development costs and a configuration of the used recognition approaches can be performed even on a running system. Thus, this framework might also benefit from future advances in computer vision. Thirdly, we present an automatic selection approach to support the use of different recognition strategies for different objects. Last but not least, visual analysis can be performed efficiently on distributed, multi-processor environments and a database schema is presented to store the resulting video annotations as well as the off-line generated low-level features in a compact form. We achieve promising results in an annotation case study and the instance search task of the TRECVID 2011 challenge. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Visual Information Retrieval)
Open AccessArticle Using Web 2.0 Technologies for Collaborative Learning in Distance Education—Case Studies from an Australian University
Future Internet 2012, 4(1), 216-237; doi:10.3390/fi4010216
Received: 8 December 2011 / Revised: 8 February 2012 / Accepted: 2 March 2012 / Published: 7 March 2012
Cited by 6 | PDF Full-text (502 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
This paper explores the use of Web 2.0 technologies for collaborative learning in a higher education context. A review of the literature exploring the strengths and weaknesses of Web 2.0 technology is presented, and a conceptual model of a Web 2.0 community [...] Read more.
This paper explores the use of Web 2.0 technologies for collaborative learning in a higher education context. A review of the literature exploring the strengths and weaknesses of Web 2.0 technology is presented, and a conceptual model of a Web 2.0 community of inquiry is introduced. Two Australian case studies are described, with an ex-poste evaluation of the use of Web 2.0 tools. Conclusions are drawn as to the potential for the use of Web 2.0 tools for collaborative e-learning in higher education. In particular, design and integration of Web 2.0 tools should be closely related to curriculum intent and pedagogical requirements, care must be taken to provide clear guidance on both expected student activity and learning expectations, and there is a clear need to develop, support and encourage strong interaction both between teachers and students, and amongst the students themselves. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue NeoGeography and WikiPlanning)
Figures

Open AccessArticle Readability and the Web
Future Internet 2012, 4(1), 238-252; doi:10.3390/fi4010238
Received: 20 December 2011 / Revised: 7 February 2012 / Accepted: 5 March 2012 / Published: 12 March 2012
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (268 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Readability indices measure how easy or difficult it is to read and comprehend a text. In this paper we look at the relation between readability indices and web documents from two different perspectives. On the one hand we analyse how to reliably [...] Read more.
Readability indices measure how easy or difficult it is to read and comprehend a text. In this paper we look at the relation between readability indices and web documents from two different perspectives. On the one hand we analyse how to reliably measure the readability of web documents by applying content extraction techniques and incorporating a bias correction. On the other hand we investigate how web based corpus statistics can be used to measure readability in a novel and language independent way. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Selected Papers from ITA 11)
Open AccessArticle Secure Military Social Networking and Rapid Sensemaking in Domain Specific Concept Systems: Research Issues and Future Solutions
Future Internet 2012, 4(1), 253-264; doi:10.3390/fi4010253
Received: 21 December 2011 / Revised: 2 March 2012 / Accepted: 5 March 2012 / Published: 12 March 2012
PDF Full-text (340 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
This paper identifies the need for a secure military social networking site and the underlying research issues linked to the successful development of such sites. The paper further proposes a solution to the most basic issues by identifying and tackling known potential [...] Read more.
This paper identifies the need for a secure military social networking site and the underlying research issues linked to the successful development of such sites. The paper further proposes a solution to the most basic issues by identifying and tackling known potential security threats to military personnel and their families. The paper further defines the base platform for this development to facilitate rapid sensemaking to inform critical communications and rapid decision making processes during abrupt governance and eco-system change, and how the plethora of information (termed as Big Data) on social networking sites can be analysed and harnessed. Underlying architectural issues, efficiency and complexity are explored and their future development is considered. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Selected Papers from ITA 11)
Open AccessArticle WikiGIS Basic Concepts: Web 2.0 for Geospatial Collaboration
Future Internet 2012, 4(1), 265-284; doi:10.3390/fi4010265
Received: 7 November 2011 / Revised: 22 February 2012 / Accepted: 23 February 2012 / Published: 13 March 2012
Cited by 3 | PDF Full-text (928 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
With the emergence of Web 2.0, new applications arise and evolve into more interactive forms of collective intelligence. These applications offer to both professionals and citizens an open and expanded access to geographic information. In this paper, we develop the conceptual foundations [...] Read more.
With the emergence of Web 2.0, new applications arise and evolve into more interactive forms of collective intelligence. These applications offer to both professionals and citizens an open and expanded access to geographic information. In this paper, we develop the conceptual foundations of a new technology solution called WikiGIS. WikiGIS’s strength lies in its ability to ensure the traceability of changes in spatial-temporal geographic components (geometric location and shape, graphics: iconography and descriptive) generated by users. The final use case highlights to what extent WikiGIS could be a relevant and useful technological innovation in Geocollaboration. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue NeoGeography and WikiPlanning)
Open AccessArticle Characteristics of Heavily Edited Objects in OpenStreetMap
Future Internet 2012, 4(1), 285-305; doi:10.3390/fi4010285
Received: 30 January 2012 / Revised: 7 March 2012 / Accepted: 16 March 2012 / Published: 20 March 2012
Cited by 29 | PDF Full-text (352 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
This paper describes the results of an analysis of the OpenStreetMap (OSM) database for the United Kingdom (UK) and Ireland (correct to April 2011). 15, 640 OSM ways (polygons and polylines), resulting in 316, 949 unique versions of these objects, were extracted [...] Read more.
This paper describes the results of an analysis of the OpenStreetMap (OSM) database for the United Kingdom (UK) and Ireland (correct to April 2011). 15, 640 OSM ways (polygons and polylines), resulting in 316, 949 unique versions of these objects, were extracted and analysed from the OSM database for the UK and Ireland. In our analysis we only considered “heavily edited” objects in OSM: objects which have been edited 15 or more times. Our results show that there is no strong relationship between increasing numbers of contributors to a given object and the number of tags (metadata) assigned to it. 87% of contributions/edits to these objects are performed by 11% of the total 4128 contributors. In 79% of edits additional spatial data (nodes) are added to objects. The results in this paper do not attempt to evaluate the OSM data as good/poor quality but rather informs potential consumers of OSM data that the data itself is changing over time. In developing a better understanding of the characteristics of “heavily edited” objects there may be opportunities to use historical analysis in working towards quality indicators for OSM in the future. Full article
Open AccessArticle Driving the Internet: Mobile Internets, Cars, and the Social
Future Internet 2012, 4(1), 306-321; doi:10.3390/fi4010306
Received: 22 December 2011 / Revised: 7 March 2012 / Accepted: 14 March 2012 / Published: 20 March 2012
Cited by 6 | PDF Full-text (207 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
This paper looks at the tandem technologies of cars and the Internet, and the new ways that they are assembling the social with the mobile Internet. My argument is two-fold: firstly, the advent of mobile Internet in cars brings together new, widely [...] Read more.
This paper looks at the tandem technologies of cars and the Internet, and the new ways that they are assembling the social with the mobile Internet. My argument is two-fold: firstly, the advent of mobile Internet in cars brings together new, widely divergent trajectories of Internet; secondly, such developments have social implications that vary widely depending on whether or not we recognize the broader technological systems and infrastructures, media practices, flows, and mobilities in which vehicular mobile Internets are being created. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Social Transformations from the Mobile Internet)
Open AccessArticle Blueprinting Approach in Support of Cloud Computing
Future Internet 2012, 4(1), 322-346; doi:10.3390/fi4010322
Received: 23 November 2011 / Revised: 21 February 2012 / Accepted: 19 March 2012 / Published: 21 March 2012
Cited by 8 | PDF Full-text (1793 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Current cloud service offerings, i.e., Software-as-a-service (SaaS), Platform-as-a-service (PaaS) and Infrastructure-as-a-service (IaaS) offerings are often provided as monolithic, one-size-fits-all solutions and give little or no room for customization. This limits the ability of Service-based Application (SBA) developers to configure and syndicate [...] Read more.
Current cloud service offerings, i.e., Software-as-a-service (SaaS), Platform-as-a-service (PaaS) and Infrastructure-as-a-service (IaaS) offerings are often provided as monolithic, one-size-fits-all solutions and give little or no room for customization. This limits the ability of Service-based Application (SBA) developers to configure and syndicate offerings from multiple SaaS, PaaS, and IaaS providers to address their application requirements. Furthermore, combining different independent cloud services necessitates a uniform description format that facilitates the design, customization, and composition. Cloud Blueprinting is a novel approach that allows SBA developers to easily design, configure and deploy virtual SBA payloads on virtual machines and resource pools on the cloud. We propose the Blueprint concept as a uniform abstract description for cloud service offerings that may cross different cloud computing layers, i.e., SaaS, PaaS and IaaS. To support developers with the SBA design and development in the cloud, this paper introduces a formal Blueprint Template for unambiguously describing a blueprint, as well as a Blueprint Lifecycle that guides developers through the manipulation, composition and deployment of different blueprints for an SBA. Finally, the empirical evaluation of the blueprinting approach within an EC’s FP7 project is reported and an associated blueprint prototype implementation is presented. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Advances in Web Services)
Open AccessArticle Human Geomatics in Urban Design—Two Case Studies
Future Internet 2012, 4(1), 347-361; doi:10.3390/fi4010347
Received: 9 December 2011 / Revised: 6 February 2012 / Accepted: 14 March 2012 / Published: 22 March 2012
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (2482 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The mapping of different aspects of urban phenomena and their relation to the physical cityscape has been greatly extended by the use of geomatics. The tradition to base reasoning on ‘understanding the world’ dates from the time of Aristotle. The [...] Read more.
The mapping of different aspects of urban phenomena and their relation to the physical cityscape has been greatly extended by the use of geomatics. The tradition to base reasoning on ‘understanding the world’ dates from the time of Aristotle. The extension plan for Barcelona (Eixample), developed by Cerdà, which opened the era of modern urban planning, was preceded by analyses of rich data, describing both detailed demographic issues and physical structures. The contemporary, postmodernist city planning continues this tradition, although a shift towards analyses of more human-related issues can be observed, covering, inter alia, citizens’ perception, cultural differences and patterns of human activities with regard to distinct social groups. The change towards a more human-related perspective and the inclusion of urban morphology analyses are direct consequences of this trend. The required data may be gathered within a crowd-sourcing participation process. According to communicative planning theory, communication with the wider public is indispensable in order to achieve the best results, and can be realized with the use of sophisticated IT tools. Evidence-based reasoning may be supported by images of significant aesthetic values, which inspire immediate reactions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue NeoGeography and WikiPlanning)

Other

Jump to: Research

Open AccessEssay When Atoms Meet Bits: Social Media, the Mobile Web and Augmented Revolution
Future Internet 2012, 4(1), 83-91; doi:10.3390/fi4010083
Received: 29 November 2011 / Revised: 12 January 2012 / Accepted: 18 January 2012 / Published: 23 January 2012
Cited by 23 | PDF Full-text (201 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The rise of mobile phones and social media may come to be historically coupled with a growing atmosphere of dissent that is enveloping much of the globe. The Arab Spring, UK Riots, Occupy and many other protests and so-called “flash-mobs” are all [...] Read more.
The rise of mobile phones and social media may come to be historically coupled with a growing atmosphere of dissent that is enveloping much of the globe. The Arab Spring, UK Riots, Occupy and many other protests and so-called “flash-mobs” are all massive gatherings of digitally-connected individuals in physical space; and they have recently become the new normal. The primary role of technology in producing this atmosphere has, in part, been to effectively link the on and the offline. The trend to view these as separate spaces, what I call “digital dualism”, is faulty. Instead, I argue that the digital and physical enmesh to form an “augmented reality”. Linking the power of the digital–creating and disseminating networked information–with the power of the physical–occupying geographic space with flesh-and-blood bodies–is an important part of why we have this current flammable atmosphere of augmented revolution. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Social Transformations from the Mobile Internet)

Journal Contact

MDPI AG
Future Internet Editorial Office
St. Alban-Anlage 66, 4052 Basel, Switzerland
futureinternet@mdpi.com
Tel. +41 61 683 77 34
Fax: +41 61 302 89 18
Editorial Board
Contact Details Submit to Future Internet
Back to Top