Special Issue "NeoGeography and WikiPlanning"

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A special issue of Future Internet (ISSN 1999-5903).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 November 2011)

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Dr. Beniamino Murgante (Website)

School of Engineering, University of Basilicata, 10 Viale dell’Ateneo Lucano, 85100 Potenza, Italy
Interests: spatial planning; spatial simulation; geodemographics; geographic data analysis of socio-economic and population data; planning 2.0; participation 2.0; e-democracy; e-participation
Guest Editor
Dr. Giuseppe Borruso

DEAMS - Department of Economic, Business, Mathematical and Statistical Sciences, University of Trieste, Via A. Valerio, 4/1, 34127 Trieste, Italy
Fax: +39 040 558 7009
Interests: GIS; spatial analysis; geostatistics; network spatial analysis; GI & socioeconomics; economic and business geography; retail geography; geodemographics
Guest Editor
Dr. Maurizio Gibin

Geographic Information Science, Birkbeck College, School of Geography, Room 168, Birkbeck, University of London, Malet Street, London, WC1E 7HX, UK
Fax: +44 207 631 6498
Interests: GIS; spatial analysis; geovisualisation and user interaction issues; geographic data analysis of socio-economic and population data; health geography; geodemographics; geoweb 2.0 applications to deploy geographic information; cartography and analytical design in thematic mapping

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The advent of Web 2.0 made available techonologies and services such as blogs, social networking, Wikis and RSS/XML feeds that allowed many users to the create their own content and share it through simple and freely available tools. The shift to a user-generated content paradigm on the web fostered changes in sharing and analyzing geographic information. The term “neogeography” rose as a way to describe people activities when using and creating their own maps, geo-tagging pictures, movies, websites, etc. It could be defined as a new bottom – up approach to geography prompted by users, therefore introducing changes in the roles of ‘traditional’ geographers and ‘consumers’ of geographical contents themselves.

During the past decades, the main issue in GIS implementation has been the availability of sound spatial information. Nowadays, the wide diffusion of electronic devices providing geo-referenced information have resulted in the production of extensive spatial information datasets. This trend has led to “GIS wikification”, where mass collaboration plays a key role in main components of spatial information frameworks (hardware, software, data, and people). Goodchild, (2007) introduced “Volunteered Geographic Information” (VGI), as the harnessing of tools to create, assemble, and disseminate geographic information provided by individuals voluntarily creating their own contents by marking the locations of occurred events or by labeling certain existing features. not already been shown on map. The volunteered approach has been adopted by important American organizations, such as US Geological Survey, US Census Bureau, etc. Whilst technologies (e.g. GPS, remote sensing, etc.) can be useful in producing new spatial data, volunteered activities are the only way to update and describe such data. If, on one hand, spatial data have been produced in various ways, on the other hand remote sensing, sensor networks and other electronic devices generate a great flow of relevant spatial information concerning several aspects of human activities or of environmental phenomena monitoring. This “Information-Explosion Era” is characterised by a large amount of information produced both by human activities and by automated systems; the capturing and the manipulation of this information leads to” urban computing” and represents a sort of bridge between computers and the real world, accounting for the social dimension of human environments. This technological evolution produced a new Paradigm of Urban Development, called “u-City”. Such phenomena offer new challenges to scholars (geographers, engineers, planners, economists, sociologists, etc.) as well as to spatial planners in addressing spatial issues and a wealth of brand-new, updated data, generally created by people who are interested in geographically related phenomena. As attention is to-date dedicated to visualization and content creation, little has still been done from the spatial analytical point of view and in involving users – as citizens – in participatory geographical activities.

Beniamino Murgante
Giuseppe Borruso
Maurizio Gibin
Guest Editors

Submission

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. Papers will be published continuously (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

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Keywords

  • neogeography
  • volunteered geographic information
  • crowdsourcing
  • collaborative mapping
  • WikiCities
  • wikinomics
  • GeoDesign
  • planning 2.0
  • participation 2.0
  • urban social networks
  • urban sensing
  • e-democracy
  • eParticipation
  • participatory GIS
  • geography
  • technologies for eParticipation
  • second life and participatory games
  • SDI and planning
  • ontologies for urban planning
  • urban computing
  • ubiquitous-city

Published Papers (11 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle Focus on Citizens: Public Engagement with Online and Face-to-Face Participation—A Case Study
Future Internet 2012, 4(2), 592-606; doi:10.3390/fi4020592
Received: 2 March 2012 / Revised: 3 May 2012 / Accepted: 7 June 2012 / Published: 15 June 2012
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (1094 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The main objective of this paper is to focus on how an integrated system based on Information Communication Technology (ICT) and face-to-face communication can increase participation in order to have a positive effect on quality of life, plans and decisions, and to [...] Read more.
The main objective of this paper is to focus on how an integrated system based on Information Communication Technology (ICT) and face-to-face communication can increase participation in order to have a positive effect on quality of life, plans and decisions, and to discuss the many benefits which web-based public participation can bring to the planning process through a set of improvements to relations, quality and structure of cities in general and in this case example specifically. With the development of a transparent support system for collaborative decision-making processes, it is possible to identify a strategy for addressing gaps to reach collaborative decisions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue NeoGeography and WikiPlanning)
Open AccessArticle The U-City Paradigm: Opportunities and Risks for E-Democracy in Collaborative Planning
Future Internet 2012, 4(2), 563-574; doi:10.3390/fi4020563
Received: 25 January 2012 / Revised: 5 March 2012 / Accepted: 22 May 2012 / Published: 5 June 2012
Cited by 6 | PDF Full-text (283 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Volunteered Geographic Information (VGI) tools appear to enhance the possibilities offered by a collaborative approach to planning. The present paper analyzes both the results of experiences of the author and of those available in the literature, highlighting possible advantages and disadvantages. After [...] Read more.
Volunteered Geographic Information (VGI) tools appear to enhance the possibilities offered by a collaborative approach to planning. The present paper analyzes both the results of experiences of the author and of those available in the literature, highlighting possible advantages and disadvantages. After a brief introduction to the meaning of e-democracy, the second part focuses on the role of ICT in collaborative planning, proceeding in the third part to an illustration of an initial panorama of knowledge gathered using ICT in such processes, while discussing criticisms and opportunities. The fourth part discusses the U-city paradigm as a driver of change in urban planning participation processes. Research perspectives are then outlined in the final part. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue NeoGeography and WikiPlanning)
Open AccessArticle Crowd Sourcing for Conservation: Web 2.0 a Powerful Tool for Biologists
Future Internet 2012, 4(2), 551-562; doi:10.3390/fi4020551
Received: 1 February 2012 / Revised: 7 May 2012 / Accepted: 10 May 2012 / Published: 24 May 2012
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (463 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The advent and adoption of Web 2.0 technologies offers a powerful approach to enhancing the capture of information in natural resource ecology, notably community knowledge of species distributions. Such information has previously been collected using, for example, postal surveys; these are typically [...] Read more.
The advent and adoption of Web 2.0 technologies offers a powerful approach to enhancing the capture of information in natural resource ecology, notably community knowledge of species distributions. Such information has previously been collected using, for example, postal surveys; these are typically inefficient, with low response rates, high costs, and requiring respondents to be spatially literate. Here we describe an example, using the Google Maps Application Programming Interface, to discuss the opportunities such tools provide to conservation biology. Toad Tracker was created as a prototype to demonstrate the utility of this technology to document the distribution of an invasive vertebrate pest species, the cane toad, within Australia. While the technological aspects of this tool are satisfactory, manager resistance towards its use raises issues around the public nature of the technology, the collaborative (non-expert) role in data collection, and data ownership. We conclude in suggesting that, for such tools to be accepted by non-innovation adopters, work is required on both the technological aspects and, importantly, a cultural change is required to create an environment of acceptance of the shifting relationship between authority, expertise and knowledge. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue NeoGeography and WikiPlanning)
Open AccessArticle Collaborative Open Source Geospatial Tools and Maps Supporting the Response Planning to Disastrous Earthquake Events
Future Internet 2012, 4(2), 451-468; doi:10.3390/fi4020451
Received: 29 December 2011 / Revised: 20 March 2012 / Accepted: 27 April 2012 / Published: 7 May 2012
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (1296 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The latest improvements in geo-informatics offer new opportunities in a wide range of territorial and environmental applications. In this general framework, a relevant issue is represented by earthquake early warning and emergency management. This research work presents the investigation and development of [...] Read more.
The latest improvements in geo-informatics offer new opportunities in a wide range of territorial and environmental applications. In this general framework, a relevant issue is represented by earthquake early warning and emergency management. This research work presents the investigation and development of a simple and innovative geospatial methodology and related collaborative open source geospatial tools for predicting and mapping the vulnerability to seismic hazard in order to support the response planning to disastrous events. The proposed geospatial methodology and tools have been integrated into an open source collaborative GIS system, designed and developed as an integrated component of an earthquake early warning and emergency management system. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue NeoGeography and WikiPlanning)
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Open AccessArticle Human Geomatics in Urban Design—Two Case Studies
Future Internet 2012, 4(1), 347-361; doi:10.3390/fi4010347
Received: 9 December 2011 / Revised: 6 February 2012 / Accepted: 14 March 2012 / Published: 22 March 2012
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (2482 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The mapping of different aspects of urban phenomena and their relation to the physical cityscape has been greatly extended by the use of geomatics. The tradition to base reasoning on ‘understanding the world’ dates from the time of Aristotle. The [...] Read more.
The mapping of different aspects of urban phenomena and their relation to the physical cityscape has been greatly extended by the use of geomatics. The tradition to base reasoning on ‘understanding the world’ dates from the time of Aristotle. The extension plan for Barcelona (Eixample), developed by Cerdà, which opened the era of modern urban planning, was preceded by analyses of rich data, describing both detailed demographic issues and physical structures. The contemporary, postmodernist city planning continues this tradition, although a shift towards analyses of more human-related issues can be observed, covering, inter alia, citizens’ perception, cultural differences and patterns of human activities with regard to distinct social groups. The change towards a more human-related perspective and the inclusion of urban morphology analyses are direct consequences of this trend. The required data may be gathered within a crowd-sourcing participation process. According to communicative planning theory, communication with the wider public is indispensable in order to achieve the best results, and can be realized with the use of sophisticated IT tools. Evidence-based reasoning may be supported by images of significant aesthetic values, which inspire immediate reactions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue NeoGeography and WikiPlanning)
Open AccessArticle WikiGIS Basic Concepts: Web 2.0 for Geospatial Collaboration
Future Internet 2012, 4(1), 265-284; doi:10.3390/fi4010265
Received: 7 November 2011 / Revised: 22 February 2012 / Accepted: 23 February 2012 / Published: 13 March 2012
Cited by 3 | PDF Full-text (928 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
With the emergence of Web 2.0, new applications arise and evolve into more interactive forms of collective intelligence. These applications offer to both professionals and citizens an open and expanded access to geographic information. In this paper, we develop the conceptual foundations [...] Read more.
With the emergence of Web 2.0, new applications arise and evolve into more interactive forms of collective intelligence. These applications offer to both professionals and citizens an open and expanded access to geographic information. In this paper, we develop the conceptual foundations of a new technology solution called WikiGIS. WikiGIS’s strength lies in its ability to ensure the traceability of changes in spatial-temporal geographic components (geometric location and shape, graphics: iconography and descriptive) generated by users. The final use case highlights to what extent WikiGIS could be a relevant and useful technological innovation in Geocollaboration. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue NeoGeography and WikiPlanning)
Open AccessArticle Using Web 2.0 Technologies for Collaborative Learning in Distance Education—Case Studies from an Australian University
Future Internet 2012, 4(1), 216-237; doi:10.3390/fi4010216
Received: 8 December 2011 / Revised: 8 February 2012 / Accepted: 2 March 2012 / Published: 7 March 2012
Cited by 6 | PDF Full-text (502 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
This paper explores the use of Web 2.0 technologies for collaborative learning in a higher education context. A review of the literature exploring the strengths and weaknesses of Web 2.0 technology is presented, and a conceptual model of a Web 2.0 community [...] Read more.
This paper explores the use of Web 2.0 technologies for collaborative learning in a higher education context. A review of the literature exploring the strengths and weaknesses of Web 2.0 technology is presented, and a conceptual model of a Web 2.0 community of inquiry is introduced. Two Australian case studies are described, with an ex-poste evaluation of the use of Web 2.0 tools. Conclusions are drawn as to the potential for the use of Web 2.0 tools for collaborative e-learning in higher education. In particular, design and integration of Web 2.0 tools should be closely related to curriculum intent and pedagogical requirements, care must be taken to provide clear guidance on both expected student activity and learning expectations, and there is a clear need to develop, support and encourage strong interaction both between teachers and students, and amongst the students themselves. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue NeoGeography and WikiPlanning)
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Open AccessArticle A Land Use Planning Ontology: LBCS
Future Internet 2012, 4(1), 65-82; doi:10.3390/fi4010065
Received: 30 November 2011 / Revised: 28 December 2011 / Accepted: 30 December 2011 / Published: 6 January 2012
Cited by 4 | PDF Full-text (490 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Urban planning has a considerable impact on the economic performance of cities and on the quality of life of their populations. Efficiency at this level has been hampered by the lack of integrated tools to adequately describe urban space in order to [...] Read more.
Urban planning has a considerable impact on the economic performance of cities and on the quality of life of their populations. Efficiency at this level has been hampered by the lack of integrated tools to adequately describe urban space in order to formulate appropriate design solutions. This paper describes an ontology called LBCS-OWL2 specifically developed to overcome this flaw, based on the Land Based Classification Standards (LBCS), a comprehensive and detailed land use standard to describe the different dimensions of urban space. The goal is to provide semantic and computer-readable land use descriptions of geo-referenced spatial data. This will help to make programming strategies available to those involved in the urban development process. There are several advantages to transferring a land use standard to an OWL2 land use ontology: it is modular, it can be shared and reused, it can be extended and data consistency maintained, and it is ready for integration, thereby supporting the interoperability of different urban planning applications. This standard is used as a basic structure for the “City Information Modelling” (CIM) model developed within a larger research project called City Induction, which aims to develop a tool for urban planning and design. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue NeoGeography and WikiPlanning)
Open AccessArticle The Street Network Evolution of Crowdsourced Maps: OpenStreetMap in Germany 2007–2011
Future Internet 2012, 4(1), 1-21; doi:10.3390/fi4010001
Received: 1 December 2011 / Revised: 16 December 2011 / Accepted: 19 December 2011 / Published: 29 December 2011
Cited by 71 | PDF Full-text (890 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The OpenStreetMap (OSM) project is a prime example in the field of Volunteered Geographic Information (VGI). Worldwide, several hundred thousand people are currently contributing information to the “free” geodatabase. However, the data contributions show a geographically heterogeneous pattern around the globe. Germany [...] Read more.
The OpenStreetMap (OSM) project is a prime example in the field of Volunteered Geographic Information (VGI). Worldwide, several hundred thousand people are currently contributing information to the “free” geodatabase. However, the data contributions show a geographically heterogeneous pattern around the globe. Germany counts as one of the most active countries in OSM; thus, the German street network has undergone an extensive development in recent years. The question that remains is this: How does the street network perform in a relative comparison with a commercial dataset? By means of a variety of studies, we show that the difference between the OSM street network for car navigation in Germany and a comparable proprietary dataset was only 9% in June 2011. The results of our analysis regarding the entire street network showed that OSM even exceeds the information provided by the proprietary dataset by 27%. Further analyses show on what scale errors can be reckoned with in the topology of the street network, and the completeness of turn restrictions and street name information. In addition to the analyses conducted over the past few years, projections have additionally been made about the point in time by which the OSM dataset for Germany can be considered “complete” in relative comparison to a commercial dataset. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue NeoGeography and WikiPlanning)
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Open AccessArticle Sharing Integrated Spatial and Thematic Data: The CRISOLA Case for Malta and the European Project Plan4all Process
Future Internet 2011, 3(4), 344-361; doi:10.3390/fi3040344
Received: 9 October 2011 / Revised: 29 November 2011 / Accepted: 16 December 2011 / Published: 20 December 2011
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (1907 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Sharing data across diverse thematic disciplines is only the next step in a series of hard-fought efforts to ensure barrier-free data availability. The Plan4all project is one such effort, focusing on the interoperability and harmonisation of spatial planning data as based on [...] Read more.
Sharing data across diverse thematic disciplines is only the next step in a series of hard-fought efforts to ensure barrier-free data availability. The Plan4all project is one such effort, focusing on the interoperability and harmonisation of spatial planning data as based on the INSPIRE protocols. The aims are to support holistic planning and the development of a European network of public and private actors as well as Spatial Data Infrastructure (SDI). The Plan4all and INSPIRE standards enable planners to publish and share spatial planning data. The Malta case tackled the wider scenario for sharing of data, through the investigation of the availability, transformation and dissemination of data using geoportals. The study is brought to the fore with an analysis of the approaches taken to ensure that data in the physical and social domains are harmonised in an internationally-established process. Through an analysis of the criminological theme, the Plan4all process is integrated with the social and land use themes as identified in the CRISOLA model. The process serves as a basis for the need to view sharing as one part of the datacycle rather than an end in itself: without a solid protocol the foundations have been laid for the implementation of the datasets in the social and crime domains. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue NeoGeography and WikiPlanning)
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Open AccessArticle An Ontology of the Strategic Environmental Assessment of City Masterplans
Future Internet 2011, 3(4), 362-378; doi:10.3390/fi3040362
Received: 10 November 2011 / Revised: 9 December 2011 / Accepted: 16 December 2011 / Published: 20 December 2011
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (1305 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Following a discussion on the semantics of the term “ontology”, this paper discusses some key points concerning the ontology of the Strategic Environmental Assessment procedure applied to city Masterplans, using sustainability as a reference point. It also assumes the implementation of Guidelines [...] Read more.
Following a discussion on the semantics of the term “ontology”, this paper discusses some key points concerning the ontology of the Strategic Environmental Assessment procedure applied to city Masterplans, using sustainability as a reference point. It also assumes the implementation of Guidelines of the Autonomous Region of Sardinia as an experimental context, with the objective of proposing the SEA ontology as an important contribution to improve SEA’s effectiveness. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue NeoGeography and WikiPlanning)
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