Next Issue
Previous Issue

Table of Contents

Arts, Volume 6, Issue 3 (September 2017)

  • Issues are regarded as officially published after their release is announced to the table of contents alert mailing list.
  • You may sign up for e-mail alerts to receive table of contents of newly released issues.
  • PDF is the official format for papers published in both, html and pdf forms. To view the papers in pdf format, click on the "PDF Full-text" link, and use the free Adobe Readerexternal link to open them.
View options order results:
result details:
Displaying articles 1-6
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Other

Open AccessArticle Sites with Paintings in Morocco and the Atlantic Sahara
Arts 2017, 6(3), 9; doi:10.3390/arts6030009
Received: 15 July 2016 / Accepted: 12 October 2016 / Published: 4 July 2017
PDF Full-text (2650 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
This article lists the rock art sites in Morocco with painted images so far published. It updates and includes the inventory of such sites published over 15 years ago. Short descriptions of the situation and contents of both new and old sites are
[...] Read more.
This article lists the rock art sites in Morocco with painted images so far published. It updates and includes the inventory of such sites published over 15 years ago. Short descriptions of the situation and contents of both new and old sites are given. Full article
(This article belongs to the collection World Rock Art)
Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle Reappraising the Visionary Work of Arata Isozaki: Six Decades and Four Phases
Arts 2017, 6(3), 10; doi:10.3390/arts6030010
Received: 20 May 2017 / Revised: 21 June 2017 / Accepted: 29 June 2017 / Published: 7 July 2017
PDF Full-text (1753 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
This article analyses the work and presents a portrait of Japanese architect Arata Isozaki. His designs and buildings span six decades and it is suggested that these can be categorised into four distinctively different phases. As a former collaborator of Isozaki during the
[...] Read more.
This article analyses the work and presents a portrait of Japanese architect Arata Isozaki. His designs and buildings span six decades and it is suggested that these can be categorised into four distinctively different phases. As a former collaborator of Isozaki during the 1990s, the author is able to draw from first-hand observations and knowledge to explain relevant projects. As the discussion points out, Isozaki’s work is highly unusual, original, complex and personal in its absorption of a multitude of influences and its interdisciplinary approach; thus, one could say that he has created ideas and concepts for spaces that defy characterisation as belonging to any single school of thought. Full article
(This article belongs to the Section Applied Arts)
Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle Sustainable Features of Vernacular Architecture: Housing of Eastern Black Sea Region as a Case Study
Arts 2017, 6(3), 11; doi:10.3390/arts6030011
Received: 22 May 2017 / Revised: 27 July 2017 / Accepted: 4 August 2017 / Published: 17 August 2017
PDF Full-text (5973 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The contributions of sustainability to architectural designs are steadily increasing in parallel with developments in technology. Although sustainability seems to be a new concept in today’s architecture, in reality, it is not. This is because, much of sustainable architectural design principles depend on
[...] Read more.
The contributions of sustainability to architectural designs are steadily increasing in parallel with developments in technology. Although sustainability seems to be a new concept in today’s architecture, in reality, it is not. This is because, much of sustainable architectural design principles depend on references to vernacular architecture, and there are many examples found in different parts of the world to which architects can refer. When the world seeks for more sustainable buildings, it is acceptable to revisit the past in order to understand sustainable features of vernacular architecture. It is clear that vernacular architecture has a knowledge that matters to be studied and classified from a sustainability point of view. This work aims to demonstrate that vernacular architecture can contribute to improving sustainability in construction. In this sense, the paper evaluates specific vernacular housing in Eastern Black Sea Region in Turkey and their response to nature and ecology. In order to explain this response, field work was carried out and the vernacular architectural accumulation of the region was examined on site. The features of the examples have been identified and debated in today’s sustainable architectural concept. This work holistically evaluates this architectural manifestation, in the light of current knowledge, in order to find scientific justification for its knowledge to verify and promote its application in the future. Full article
Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle The Screen in Fresco Paintings: A Study of the ‘Screen-Style Frescoes’ in the Temples of Gaoping County in China
Arts 2017, 6(3), 13; doi:10.3390/arts6030013
Received: 26 July 2017 / Revised: 2 September 2017 / Accepted: 2 September 2017 / Published: 12 September 2017
PDF Full-text (17832 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Screen-style frescoes, found in the temples of Gaoping County, Shanxi Province, China, and originating mostly from the Qing Dynasty, present a unique painting form. Folk artists not only painted the screen, a common object in everyday life in ancient China, on the wall
[...] Read more.
Screen-style frescoes, found in the temples of Gaoping County, Shanxi Province, China, and originating mostly from the Qing Dynasty, present a unique painting form. Folk artists not only painted the screen, a common object in everyday life in ancient China, on the wall surfaces, but also created a variety of paintings inside the screen panels, whereby the viewer sees a painting within a painting. This article, based on multiple field trips, aims to analyze screen-style frescoes in terms of their locations, styles, and unique artistic characteristics such as subject matter, color usage, and brushwork. By studying the influence of literati paintings from the Ming and Qing Dynasties, the author also reveals the aesthetic transition from religious scenes to secular life as presented in the temple frescoes in ancient Gaoping County. Full article
Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle Pop-Up, Liquid Architecture for a Liquid World
Arts 2017, 6(3), 14; doi:10.3390/arts6030014
Received: 29 March 2017 / Revised: 18 June 2017 / Accepted: 29 August 2017 / Published: 15 September 2017
PDF Full-text (8386 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The present paper will translate the term liquid modernity into architecture: What is liquid architecture? In the contemporary world, particularly in big cities, we are observing the spread of a wide range of events that generates sudden demands for transitory and short-term lodgings.
[...] Read more.
The present paper will translate the term liquid modernity into architecture: What is liquid architecture? In the contemporary world, particularly in big cities, we are observing the spread of a wide range of events that generates sudden demands for transitory and short-term lodgings. International fairs and expos, cultural festivals and sport meets all share the factor of having a strong impact on their urban context with temporary and unstable buildings (forms). These buildings are not just designed by architects but also by artists, graphic designers, musicians, photographers, and even cooks. Therefore, can we call them buildings? How is this liquid architecture? Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Contemporary Architecture from the 20th Century to the Present)
Figures

Figure 1

Other

Jump to: Research

Open AccessProject Report Mobility, Mood and Place—Co-Designing Age-Friendly Cities: A Report on Collaborations between Older People and Students of Architecture
Arts 2017, 6(3), 12; doi:10.3390/arts6030012
Received: 24 November 2016 / Revised: 3 August 2017 / Accepted: 4 August 2017 / Published: 22 August 2017
PDF Full-text (5676 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Mobility, Mood and Place explores how places can be designed collaboratively to make pedestrian mobility easy, enjoyable and meaningful for older people. The built environment often excludes marginalised groups such as older people, single mothers and others with special needs. ‘Co-design’ is emerging
[...] Read more.
Mobility, Mood and Place explores how places can be designed collaboratively to make pedestrian mobility easy, enjoyable and meaningful for older people. The built environment often excludes marginalised groups such as older people, single mothers and others with special needs. ‘Co-design’ is emerging as an important approach in architectural and urban design, which diversifies stakeholder participation and representation. Participatory co-design approaches can include such stakeholders so as to address their priorities and ensure that other stakeholders empathise with their perspective. This can enhance students’ methodological flexibility and empathy. This paper critically reflects on architecture students’ experiences, together with older adults (including stroke-survivors and those with dementia), in producing co-design research on age-friendly environments and offers some methodological insights. It also discusses competing objectives between a co-design research project that involved students of architecture and landscape design on post-graduate academic programmes. Finally, the paper will offer contributions to architects interested in designing places that take into account the needs of older people. Full article
(This article belongs to the Section Applied Arts)
Figures

Figure 1

Back to Top