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Agriculture 2013, 3(4), 613-628; doi:10.3390/agriculture3040613

Casting a Wider Net: Understanding the “Root” Causes of Human-Induced Soil Erosion

1
Department of Education, Mansfield University, Mansfield, PA 16933, USA
2
Alderhollow Gardens, South Plymouth, NY 13844, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 14 June 2013 / Revised: 15 August 2013 / Accepted: 27 August 2013 / Published: 25 September 2013
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Soil Erosion: A Major Threat to Food Production and the Environment)
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Abstract

Although science has helped us to identify and measure the threat of soil erosion to food production, we need to cast a wider net for effective solutions. Honest assessment suggests, in fact, that this kind of eco-agri-cultural issue exceeds the traditional boundaries of scientific interest. The issue of soil erosion spills out so many ways that it demands a holistic interdisciplinary approach. In this paper we explore a systems “in context” approach to understanding soil erosion built upon the interplay of Aristotle’s virtues of episteme, techne, and phronesis. We model the synergy of collaboration, where diverse ways of knowing, learning and being in the world can offer proactive soil conservation strategies—those that occur from the inside-out—instead of reactive policies, from the outside-in. We show how positivist scientific attitudes could well impede conservation efforts insofar as they can inhibit educational pedagogies meant to reconnect us to nature. In so doing, we make the ultimate argument that disparate fields of knowledge have much to offer each other and that the true synergy in solutions to soil erosion will come from the intimate interconnectedness of these different ways of knowing, learning and being in the world. View Full-Text
Keywords: soil erosion; episteme; techne; phronesis; practical wisdom; integrative education; transformative education; experiential education; soil health soil erosion; episteme; techne; phronesis; practical wisdom; integrative education; transformative education; experiential education; soil health
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY 3.0).

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MDPI and ACS Style

Whitecraft, M.A.; Jr., B.E.H. Casting a Wider Net: Understanding the “Root” Causes of Human-Induced Soil Erosion. Agriculture 2013, 3, 613-628.

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