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J. Dev. Biol., Volume 5, Issue 2 (June 2017)

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Editorial

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Open AccessEditorial Special Issue on HOX Genes in Development
J. Dev. Biol. 2017, 5(2), 5; doi:10.3390/jdb5020005
Received: 8 May 2017 / Revised: 8 May 2017 / Accepted: 9 May 2017 / Published: 10 May 2017
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(This article belongs to the Special Issue Hox Genes and Development)

Review

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Open AccessReview Moving the Shh Source over Time: What Impact on Neural Cell Diversification in the Developing Spinal Cord?
J. Dev. Biol. 2017, 5(2), 4; doi:10.3390/jdb5020004
Received: 28 February 2017 / Revised: 29 March 2017 / Accepted: 6 April 2017 / Published: 12 April 2017
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Abstract
A substantial amount of data has highlighted the crucial influence of Shh signalling on the generation of diverse classes of neurons and glial cells throughout the developing central nervous system. A critical step leading to this diversity is the establishment of distinct neural
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A substantial amount of data has highlighted the crucial influence of Shh signalling on the generation of diverse classes of neurons and glial cells throughout the developing central nervous system. A critical step leading to this diversity is the establishment of distinct neural progenitor cell domains during the process of pattern formation. The forming spinal cord, in particular, has served as an excellent model to unravel how progenitor cells respond to Shh to produce the appropriate pattern. In recent years, considerable advances have been made in our understanding of important parameters that control the temporal and spatial interpretation of the morphogen signal at the level of Shh-receiving progenitor cells. Although less studied, the identity and position of Shh source cells also undergo significant changes over time, raising the question of how moving the Shh source contributes to cell diversification in response to the morphogen. Here, we focus on the dynamics of Shh-producing cells and discuss specific roles for these time-variant Shh sources with regard to the temporal events occurring in the receiving field. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Hedgehog Signaling in Embryogenesis)
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Open AccessFeature PaperReview Sonic Hedgehog Signaling and Development of the Dentition
J. Dev. Biol. 2017, 5(2), 6; doi:10.3390/jdb5020006
Received: 4 May 2017 / Revised: 25 May 2017 / Accepted: 28 May 2017 / Published: 31 May 2017
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Abstract
Sonic hedgehog (Shh) is an essential signaling peptide required for normal embryonic development. It represents a highly-conserved marker of odontogenesis amongst the toothed vertebrates. Signal transduction is involved in early specification of the tooth-forming epithelium in the oral cavity, and, ultimately, in defining
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Sonic hedgehog (Shh) is an essential signaling peptide required for normal embryonic development. It represents a highly-conserved marker of odontogenesis amongst the toothed vertebrates. Signal transduction is involved in early specification of the tooth-forming epithelium in the oral cavity, and, ultimately, in defining tooth number within the established dentition. Shh also promotes the morphogenetic movement of epithelial cells in the early tooth bud, and influences cell cycle regulation, morphogenesis, and differentiation in the tooth germ. More recently, Shh has been identified as a stem cell regulator in the continuously erupting incisors of mice. Here, we review contemporary data relating to the role of Shh in odontogenesis, focusing on tooth development in mammals and cartilaginous fishes. We also describe the multiple actions of this signaling protein at the cellular level. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Hedgehog Signaling in Embryogenesis)
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