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Educ. Sci., Volume 2, Issue 3 (September 2012), Pages 121-164

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Open AccessArticle Global Trends in Civic and Citizenship Education: What are the Lessons for Nation States?
Educ. Sci. 2012, 2(3), 121-135; doi:10.3390/educsci2030121
Received: 9 March 2012 / Revised: 9 April 2012 / Accepted: 12 June 2012 / Published: 27 June 2012
Cited by 6 | PDF Full-text (308 KB) | XML Full-text
Abstract
Civic and citizenship education is a component of the school curriculum in all nation states. The form it takes, its purposes and the way in which it is implemented differs from jurisdiction to jurisdiction. The pressures of globalization in recent times have [...] Read more.
Civic and citizenship education is a component of the school curriculum in all nation states. The form it takes, its purposes and the way in which it is implemented differs from jurisdiction to jurisdiction. The pressures of globalization in recent times have meant that citizenship has increasingly come to be seen in global terms brought about by processes such as transnational migration, the homogenization of cultural practices and the development of supranational groupings that often seem to challenge more local versions of citizenship. Despite these pressures, the key responsibility for citizenship continues to rest with nation states. This paper will review issues relating to a more globalized citizenship and outline the strategies that nation states might adopt to ensure they remain capable of creating an active and engaged citizenship. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Civics and Citizenship in Its Global Context)
Open AccessArticle Citizenship Education through an Ability Expectation and “Ableism” Lens: The Challenge of Science and Technology and Disabled People
Educ. Sci. 2012, 2(3), 150-164; doi:10.3390/educsci2030150
Received: 1 March 2012 / Revised: 20 June 2012 / Accepted: 23 August 2012 / Published: 5 September 2012
Cited by 3 | PDF Full-text (206 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Citizenship education has been debated for some time and has faced various challenges over time. This paper introduces the lens of “ableism” and ability expectations to the citizenship education discourse. The author contends that the cultural dynamic of ability expectations and ableism [...] Read more.
Citizenship education has been debated for some time and has faced various challenges over time. This paper introduces the lens of “ableism” and ability expectations to the citizenship education discourse. The author contends that the cultural dynamic of ability expectations and ableism (not only expecting certain abilities, but also perceiving certain abilities as essential) was one factor that has and will continue to shape citizenship and citizenship education. It focuses on three areas of citizenship education: (a) active citizenship; (b) citizenship education for a diverse population; and (c) global citizenship. It covers two ability-related challenges, namely: disabled people, who are often seen as lacking expected species-typical body abilities, and, advances of science and technology that generate new abilities. The author contends that the impact of ability expectations and ableism on citizenship and citizenship education, locally and in a globalized world, is an important and under-researched area. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Civics and Citizenship in Its Global Context)

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Open AccessCase Report Teaching Sustainable Design Using BIM and Project-Based Energy Simulations
Educ. Sci. 2012, 2(3), 136-149; doi:10.3390/educsci2030136
Received: 11 July 2012 / Revised: 4 August 2012 / Accepted: 20 August 2012 / Published: 27 August 2012
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (876 KB) | XML Full-text
Abstract
The cross-disciplinary nature of energy-efficient building design has created many challenges for architecture, engineering and construction instructors. One of the technical challenges in teaching sustainable building design is enabling students to quantitatively understand how different building designs affect a building’s energy performance. [...] Read more.
The cross-disciplinary nature of energy-efficient building design has created many challenges for architecture, engineering and construction instructors. One of the technical challenges in teaching sustainable building design is enabling students to quantitatively understand how different building designs affect a building’s energy performance. Concept based instructional methods fall short in evaluating the impact of different design choices on a buildings’ energy consumption. Building Information Modeling (BIM) with energy performance software provides a feasible tool to evaluate building design parameters. One notable advantage of this tool is its ability to couple 3D visualization of the structure with energy performance analysis without requiring detailed mathematical and thermodynamic calculations. Project-based Learning (PBL) utilizing BIM tools coupled with energy analysis software was incorporated into a senior level undergraduate class. Student perceptions and feedback were analyzed to gauge the effectiveness of these techniques as instructional tools. The findings indicated that BIM-PBL can be used to effectively teach energy-efficient building design and construction. Full article

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