Special Issue "Government 2.0"

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A special issue of Future Internet (ISSN 1999-5903).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (15 March 2012)

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Dr. Elsa Estevez

Center for Electronic Governance, International Institute for Software Technology, United Nations University, Casa Silva Mendes, Est. do Engenheiro Trigo No. 4, Macao, China
Guest Editor
Dr. Gregory G. Curtin

1 Bedrosian Center on Governance and the Public Enterprise, University of Southern California, USA
2 Civic Resource Group, Suite 2175, 915 Wilshire Boulevard, Los Angeles, CA 90017, USA

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Web 2.0 technologies including blogs for journal writing, wikis for collaborative editing, mash-ups for combing contents, social media for interaction, virtual worlds for simulation, crowdsourcing for task outsourcing, and others redefine how we communicate, share our views and react to the issues that concern us. Aware of their potential, governments are adopting such technologies to engage citizens in developing policies, making decisions, enlisting support and mobilizing action towards a desirable social change, and generally to co-create a new form of government – Government 2.0.

The discussion what Government 2.0 precisely means is ongoing. However, the main objective converges on the application of web 2.0 technologies to proactively engage citizens and other stakeholders in government decisions and other governance processes beyond the election time frame, as well as to respond to their demands more effectively and efficiently.

This special issue of Future Internet focuses broadly on various aspects of Government 2.0, from technical and organizational, through social and political, to legal. Original contributions are welcome on the topics including but not limited to the following:

  • Policy lifecycles for Government 2.0
  • Policy frameworks for Government 2.0
  • New legislation requirements for Government 2.0
  • Privacy and data protection in Government 2.0
  • Government 2.0 data sharing
  • Government 2.0 security
  • Government 2.0 risk assessment
  • Inter-organizational collaboration in Government 2.0
  • Government 2.0 services
  • Government 2.0 infrastructure
  • Harnessing new technologies in Government 2.0
  • Citizen engagement through Government 2.0
  • e-Participation in Government 2.0
  • Citizen empowerment through Government 2.0
  • Government 2.0 measurement systems
  • Best practices in Government 2.0
  • Government 2.0 for disaster prevention
  • Government 2.0 for sustainable development
  • Government 2.0 and Governance 2.0

Dr. Elsa Estevez
Guest Editor

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle Creating Open Government Ecosystems: A Research and Development Agenda
Future Internet 2012, 4(4), 900-928; doi:10.3390/fi4040900
Received: 31 July 2012 / Revised: 24 September 2012 / Accepted: 7 October 2012 / Published: 23 October 2012
Cited by 18 | PDF Full-text (289 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
In this paper, we propose to view the concept of open government from the perspective of an ecosystem, a metaphor often used by policy makers, scholars, and technology gurus to convey a sense of the interdependent social systems of actors, organizations, [...] Read more.
In this paper, we propose to view the concept of open government from the perspective of an ecosystem, a metaphor often used by policy makers, scholars, and technology gurus to convey a sense of the interdependent social systems of actors, organizations, material infrastructures, and symbolic resources that can be created in technology-enabled, information-intensive social systems. We use the concept of an ecosystem to provide a framework for considering the outcomes of a workshop organized to generate a research and development agenda for open government. The agenda was produced in discussions among participants from the government (at the federal, state, and local levels), academic and civil sector communities at the Center for Technology in Government (CTG) at the University at Albany, SUNY in April 2011. The paper begins by discussing concepts central to understanding what is meant by an ecosystem and some principles that characterize its functioning. We then apply this metaphor more directly to government, proposing that policymakers engage in strategic ecosystems thinking, which means being guided by the goal of explicitly and purposefully constructing open government ecosystems. From there, we present the research agenda questions essential to the development of this new view of government's interaction with users and organizations. Our goal is to call attention to some of the fundamental ways in which government must change in order to evolve from outdated industrial bureaucratic forms to information age networked and interdependent systems. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Government 2.0)
Open AccessArticle Contributions to the Development of Local e-Government 2.0
Future Internet 2012, 4(4), 882-899; doi:10.3390/fi4040882
Received: 28 August 2012 / Revised: 28 September 2012 / Accepted: 10 October 2012 / Published: 22 October 2012
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (291 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
With the emergence of Web 2.0 (Blog, Wiki, RSS, YouTube, Flickr, Podcast, Social Networks, and Mashups), new ways of communicating, interacting and being on the Web have arisen. These new communication tools and strategies can radically change some specific work processes in [...] Read more.
With the emergence of Web 2.0 (Blog, Wiki, RSS, YouTube, Flickr, Podcast, Social Networks, and Mashups), new ways of communicating, interacting and being on the Web have arisen. These new communication tools and strategies can radically change some specific work processes in communities, such as the work processes of an autarchy. Some authors emphasize the advantages of using Web 2.0 tools in autarchies; thus, we were interested in exploring the possibilities and constraints of implementing these tools in our region of Portugal, the Minho. Using a case study methodology, we aimed to find out about the possibilities of implementing Web 2.0 tools in autarchies through exploring the interest and motivation of autarchic collaborators in their use (our unit of analysis in autarchies). Information was gathered with the help of a questionnaire, the design of which was based on previous exploratory interviews and applied to four autarchic units in the Minho region. In each unit, three different target-groups were surveyed (Councilors, Information Systems (IS) Technicians, and General Staff), so that we could triangulate the data. Data analysis and results emphasized the interest and motivation of the autarchies in using Web 2.0 tools, as well as the main constraints that would be faced during Web 2.0 implementation. It also allowed us to establish some guidelines for adequate Web 2.0 implementation, including an “ideal” profile of the person responsible for the implementation process. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Government 2.0)
Open AccessArticle Raising Risk Awareness on the Adoption of Web 2.0 Technologies in Decision Making Processes
Future Internet 2012, 4(3), 700-718; doi:10.3390/fi4030700
Received: 27 April 2012 / Revised: 14 July 2012 / Accepted: 19 July 2012 / Published: 9 August 2012
PDF Full-text (382 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
In the recent past, the so-called “Web 2.0” became a powerful tool for decision making processes. Politicians and managers, seeking to improve participation, embraced this technology as if it simply were a new, enhanced version of theWorldWideWeb, better suited to retrieve information, [...] Read more.
In the recent past, the so-called “Web 2.0” became a powerful tool for decision making processes. Politicians and managers, seeking to improve participation, embraced this technology as if it simply were a new, enhanced version of theWorldWideWeb, better suited to retrieve information, opinions and feedbacks from the general public on subjects like laws, acts and policies. This approach was often naive, neglecting the less-obvious aspects of the technology, and thus bringing on significant security problems. This paper shows how, in the end, the result could easily be the opposite of what was desired. Malicious attackers, in fact, could quite easily exploit the vulnerabilities in these systems to hijack the process and lead to wrong decisions, also causing the public to lose trust in the systems themselves. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Government 2.0)
Figures

Open AccessArticle Bloggers’ Community Characteristics and Influence within Greek Political Blogosphere
Future Internet 2012, 4(2), 396-412; doi:10.3390/fi4020396
Received: 27 February 2012 / Revised: 9 April 2012 / Accepted: 12 April 2012 / Published: 19 April 2012
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (342 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
This paper investigates the properties of central or core political blogs. They can be located as clusters of blogs whose members have many incoming links. Other blogs form clouds around them in the sense that they link the core blogs. A case [...] Read more.
This paper investigates the properties of central or core political blogs. They can be located as clusters of blogs whose members have many incoming links. Other blogs form clouds around them in the sense that they link the core blogs. A case study records Greek political blogs and their incoming links reported through their blogrolls. The adjacency matrix from the blogs’ social network is analyzed and clusters are located. Three of them, those with the larger numbers of incoming links, may be considered to be central. Next, four measures of influence are used to test the influence of the central blogs. The findings suggest that there are many kinds of central blogs, influential and non-influential, and high influence does not always involve high hyperlinking. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Government 2.0)

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