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Special Issue "Biosynthesis of Marine Natural Products"

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A special issue of Marine Drugs (ISSN 1660-3397).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 January 2011)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Pedro Abreu

DQ-CQFB/REQUIMTE, Faculdade de Ciências e Tecnologia, 2829-516 Caparica, Portugal
Website | E-Mail
Phone: 351-919835063
Fax: +351 212 948550
Interests: natural products; medicinal plants; bioguided isolation

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Over the past 15 years, we have registered an immense progress in the field of biosynthesis of secondary metabolites from marine macro- and microorganisms. The main reason for this success is directly related to the use of new genetic tools in natural products research allowing to look at genes and their function in samples obtained from marine environments. The combination of experimental strategies involving metagenomic analyses, bioinformatics, cell sorting, and microbial fermentation, in addition to the development of ingenious techniques for conducting precursor driven feeding studies, brought new insights for a detailed understanding of the biosynthetic origin and structural diversity of marine natural products.

Considering the impact of the genomic revolution in areas of natural products chemistry, it is expected that future achievements in biosynthetic studies of marine secondary metabolites should contribute to the supply of molecular toolboxes used in genetic engineering of new drugs from marine origin.

These are undoubtedly good reasons to devote this special issue of Marine Drugs to the Biosynthesis of Marine Natural Products, hoping that manuscripts here included will cover recent developments within this field.

Prof. Dr. Pedro Abreu
Guest Editor

Keywords

  • biosynthesis
  • marine macroorganisms
  • marine microorganisms
  • biodiscovery
  • genomics
  • metagenomics
  • bioinformatics
  • biosynthetic gene clusters
  • feeding studies
  • culturing techniques
  • genetic engineering

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Open AccessArticle Isolation and Characterization of a Mn(II)-Oxidizing Bacillus Strain from the Demosponge Suberites domuncula
Mar. Drugs 2011, 9(1), 1-28; doi:10.3390/md9010001
Received: 23 November 2010 / Revised: 17 December 2010 / Accepted: 22 December 2010 / Published: 23 December 2010
Cited by 10 | PDF Full-text (800 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
In this study we demonstrate that the demosponge Suberites domuncula harbors a Mn(II)-oxidizing bacterium, a Bacillus strain, termed BAC-SubDo-03. Our studies showed that Mn(II) stimulates bacterial growth and induces sporulation. Moreover, we show that these bacteria immobilize manganese on their cell surface. Comparison
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In this study we demonstrate that the demosponge Suberites domuncula harbors a Mn(II)-oxidizing bacterium, a Bacillus strain, termed BAC-SubDo-03. Our studies showed that Mn(II) stimulates bacterial growth and induces sporulation. Moreover, we show that these bacteria immobilize manganese on their cell surface. Comparison of the 16S rDNA sequence allowed the grouping of BAC-SubDo-03 to the Mn-precipitating bacteria. Analysis of the spore cell wall revealed that it contains an Mn(II)-oxidizing enzyme. Co-incubation studies of BAC-SubDo-03 with 100 µM MnCl2 and >1 µM of CuCl2 showed an increase in their Mn(II)-oxidizing capacity. In order to prove that a multicopper oxidase-like enzyme(s) (MCO) exists in the cell wall of the S. domuncula-associated BAC‑SubDo-03 Bacillus strain, the gene encoding this enzyme was cloned (mnxG‑SubDo‑03). Sequence alignment of the deduced MCO protein (MnxG-SubDo-03) revealed that the sponge bacterium clusters together with known Mn(II)-oxidizing bacteria. The expression of the mnxG-SubDo-03 gene is under strong control of extracellular Mn(II). Based on these findings, we assume that BAC-SubDo-03 might serve as a Mn reserve in the sponge providing the animal with the capacity to detoxify Mn in the environment. Applying the in vitro primmorph cell culture system we could demonstrate that sponge cells, that were co-incubated with BAC-SubDo-03 in the presence of Mn(II), show an increased proliferation potential. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biosynthesis of Marine Natural Products)

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