E-Mail Alert

Add your e-mail address to receive forthcoming issues of this journal:

Journal Browser

Journal Browser

Special Issue "Biomedicines from Marine Symbioses"

Quicklinks

A special issue of Marine Drugs (ISSN 1660-3397).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (28 February 2011)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Paul Long

Institute of Pharmaceutical Science & Department of Chemistry, King’s College London, Franklin-Wilkins Building, 150 Stamford Street, London SE1 9NH, United Kingdom
Interests: biochemical adaptations; streptomyces genetics; natural products discovery; bioinformatics

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Marine micro- and macro-organisms are a rich source of chemically diverse metabolites. In particular, secondary metabolites of marine invertebrates show exceptional promise as potential pharmaceuticals in diverse therapeutic areas in treating cancer, pain, inflammation and viral infections. Most marine invertebrates harbour microorganisms that include bacteria, cyanobacteria, fungi and eukaryotic algae where they reside as extra- and intra-cellular symbionts. Numerous products isolated from marine invertebrates are structurally homologous to known metabolites of strict microbial origin, suggesting that commensal microbiota contribute substantially to the biosynthesis of host metabolites and to the chemical ecology of these organisms. Advances in marine biology and molecular sciences have afforded greater access to these compounds than ever before. Herein, we invite submission of manuscripts describing natural product discovery from symbiotic or commensal associations between marine plants, invertebrates and microbial organisms. An economic and sustainable global market supply due to difficulty of synthesis is cited as the main obstacle for exploitation of these otherwise exciting marine bioactive compounds. Additionally, studies addressing issues of sustainable supply are also strongly encouraged.

Dr. Paul Long
Guest Editor

Keywords

  • marine drugs
  • marine natural products
  • marine symbiosis
  • microbial metagenomics
  • chemical ecology
  • bioinformatics
  • heterologous expression
  • total synthesis; aquaculture

Published Papers (2 papers)

View options order results:
result details:
Displaying articles 1-2
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Open AccessArticle Deoxyuridines from the Marine Sponge Associated Actinomycete Streptomyces microflavus
Mar. Drugs 2011, 9(5), 690-695; doi:10.3390/md9050690
Received: 9 March 2011 / Revised: 3 April 2011 / Accepted: 13 April 2011 / Published: 26 April 2011
Cited by 12 | PDF Full-text (165 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
One new nucleoside derivative, named 3-acetyl-5-methyl-2′-deoxyuridine (1), along with two known compounds 3,5-dimethyl-2′-deoxyuridine (2) and 3-methyl-2′-deoxyuridine (3), were isolated from the cultures of Streptomyces microflavus. This strain was an associated actinomycete isolated from the marine [...] Read more.
One new nucleoside derivative, named 3-acetyl-5-methyl-2′-deoxyuridine (1), along with two known compounds 3,5-dimethyl-2′-deoxyuridine (2) and 3-methyl-2′-deoxyuridine (3), were isolated from the cultures of Streptomyces microflavus. This strain was an associated actinomycete isolated from the marine sponge Hymeniacidon perlevis collected from the coast of Dalian (China). Their structures were elucidated by detailed NMR and MS spectroscopic analysis as well as comparison with literature data. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biomedicines from Marine Symbioses)
Open AccessArticle Antinociceptive and Anti-Inflammatory Activity from Algae of the Genus Caulerpa
Mar. Drugs 2011, 9(3), 307-318; doi:10.3390/md9030307
Received: 14 January 2011 / Revised: 19 February 2011 / Accepted: 24 February 2011 / Published: 2 March 2011
Cited by 24 | PDF Full-text (261 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Marine natural products have been the focus of discovery for new products of chemical and pharmacological interest. The aim of this study was to evaluate the antinociceptive activity of the methanolic (ME), acetate (AE), hexanic (HE) and chloroform (CE) extracts obtained from [...] Read more.
Marine natural products have been the focus of discovery for new products of chemical and pharmacological interest. The aim of this study was to evaluate the antinociceptive activity of the methanolic (ME), acetate (AE), hexanic (HE) and chloroform (CE) extracts obtained from Caulerpa mexicana, and ME, CE and HE obtained from Caulerpa sertularioides. These marine algae are found all over the world, mainly in tropical regions. Models such as the writhing test, the hot plate test and formalin-induced nociception test were used to evaluate antinociceptive activity in laboratory mice. In the writhing test, all the extracts were administered orally at a concentration of 100 mg/kg, and induced high peripheral antinociceptive activity, with a reduction in the nociception induced by acetic acid above 65%. In the hot plate test, treatment with extracts from C. sertularioides (100 mg/kg, p.o.) did not significantly increase the latency of response, although the ME, AE and HE from C. mexicana showed activity in this model. This result suggests that these extracts exhibit antinociceptive activity. In the formalin test, it was observed that ME, AE and HE obtained from C. mexicana reduced the effects of formalin in both phases. On the other hand only CE from C. sertularioides induced significant inhibition of the nociceptive response in the first phase. To better assess the potential anti-inflammatory activity of the extracts, the carrageenan-induced peritonitis test was used to test Caulerpa spp. extracts on cell migration into the peritoneal cavity. In this assay, all extracts evaluated were able to significantly inhibit leukocyte migration into the peritoneal cavity in comparison with carrageenan. These data demonstrate that extracts from Caulerpa species elicit pronounced antinociceptive and anti-inflamatory activity against several nociception models. However, pharmacological and chemical studies are continuing in order to characterize the mechanism(s) responsible for the antinociceptive action and also to identify the active principles present in the Caulerpa species. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biomedicines from Marine Symbioses)

Journal Contact

MDPI AG
Marine Drugs Editorial Office
St. Alban-Anlage 66, 4052 Basel, Switzerland
marinedrugs@mdpi.com
Tel. +41 61 683 77 34
Fax: +41 61 302 89 18
Editorial Board
Contact Details Submit to Marine Drugs
Back to Top