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Special Issue "Corrosion Monitoring and Control"

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A special issue of Materials (ISSN 1996-1944).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 June 2013)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Robert J. K. Wood

National Centre for Advanced Tribology at Southampton, Faculty of Engineering and the Environment, University of Southampton, Highfield, Southampton, SO17 1BJ, UK
Website | E-Mail
Phone: +44 (0)2380 594881
Fax: +44 (0)2380 593016
Interests: tribology; surface engineering; tribocorrosion; coatings; texturing; electrochemistry; fluid mechanics; erosion

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

As corrosion continues to cost industries considerable sums of money and threaten safe operations as well as limit technological development there has been a renewed effort to use modern technologies to combat corrosion and to detect it. Early detection can allow alleviation technologies to be deployed or to initiate timely and cost effective maintenance. Sensing technologies and miniaturisation of systems with energy harvesting as well as remote data streaming can allow monitoring of corrosion in structures and equipment without the need for expensive retrofits or design concepts. This special issue, therefore, will look at modern trends in corrosion control capabilities and corrosion sensing. It will highlight the uptake of modern technologies such as advanced material and coating selection, new self-healing and smart technologies, cathodic protection and inhibitor performance as well as multifunctional coatings for corrosion sensing, electrochemical sensors, microelectrode arrays and microfluidic sensors for monitoring corrosion. Electrochemical sensors, for example, are becoming increasingly important as they can provide data on both general and localised corrosion which in turn allows corrosion to be treated as a real-time process variable. Using such sensor data effectively can play an important role in the optimisation of plant operations as real-time corrosion rates can be correlated with key process parameters which can be used to inform operations. This allows continuous process optimisation by minimising corrosion rates while maximising equipment usage, production rates and plant safety. Such sensing data can also be used as part of a condition monitoring system and used to trigger inspection or maintenance.
Therefore, the special issue covers solutions covering a wide range of industrial sectors.

Prof. Dr. Robert J. K. Wood
Guest Editor

Submission

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. Papers will be published continuously (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are refereed through a peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Materials is an international peer-reviewed Open Access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1400 CHF (Swiss Francs).

Keywords

  • corrosion sensors
  • corrosion resistant coatings
  • corrosion inhibitors
  • electrochemical sensing
  • self-healing systems

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle Study of the Microstructure Evolution of Low-pH Cements Based on Ordinary Portland Cement (OPC) by Mid- and Near-Infrared Spectroscopy, and Their Influence on Corrosion of Steel Reinforcement
Materials 2013, 6(6), 2508-2521; doi:10.3390/ma6062508
Received: 9 April 2013 / Revised: 29 May 2013 / Accepted: 29 May 2013 / Published: 18 June 2013
Cited by 3 | PDF Full-text (626 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Low-pH cements are designed to be used in underground repositories for high level waste. When they are based on Ordinary Portland Cements (OPC), high mineral admixture contents must be used which significantly modify their microstructure properties and performance. This paper evaluates the microstructure
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Low-pH cements are designed to be used in underground repositories for high level waste. When they are based on Ordinary Portland Cements (OPC), high mineral admixture contents must be used which significantly modify their microstructure properties and performance. This paper evaluates the microstructure evolution of low-pH cement pastes based on OPC plus silica fume and/or fly ashes, using Mid-Infrared and Near-Infrared spectroscopy to detect cement pastes mainly composed of high polymerized C-A-S-H gels with low C/S ratios. In addition, the lower pore solution pH of these special cementitious materials have been monitored with embedded metallic sensors. Besides, as the use of reinforced concrete can be required in underground repositories, the influence of low-pH cementitious materials on steel reinforcement corrosion was analysed. Due to their lower pore solution pH and their different pore solution chemical composition a clear influence on steel reinforcement corrosion was detected. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Corrosion Monitoring and Control)
Figures

Open AccessArticle Kinetics of Corrosion Inhibition of Aluminum in Acidic Media by Water-Soluble Natural Polymeric Pectates as Anionic Polyelectrolyte Inhibitors
Materials 2013, 6(6), 2436-2451; doi:10.3390/ma6062436
Received: 2 April 2013 / Revised: 24 May 2013 / Accepted: 29 May 2013 / Published: 17 June 2013
Cited by 9 | PDF Full-text (664 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Corrosion inhibition of aluminum (Al) in hydrochloric acid by anionic polyeletrolyte pectates (PEC) as a water-soluble natural polymer polysaccharide has been studied using both gasometric and weight loss techniques. The results drawn from these two techniques are comparable and exhibit negligible differences. The
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Corrosion inhibition of aluminum (Al) in hydrochloric acid by anionic polyeletrolyte pectates (PEC) as a water-soluble natural polymer polysaccharide has been studied using both gasometric and weight loss techniques. The results drawn from these two techniques are comparable and exhibit negligible differences. The inhibition efficiency was found to increase with increasing inhibitor concentration and decrease with increasing temperature. The inhibition action of PEC on Al metal surface was found to obey the Freundlich isotherm. Factors such as the concentration and geometrical structure of the inhibitor, concentration of the corrosive medium, and temperature affecting the corrosion rates were examined. The kinetic parameters were evaluated and a suitable corrosion mechanism consistent with the kinetic results is discussed in the paper. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Corrosion Monitoring and Control)
Open AccessArticle A Novel Hydrazinecarbothioamide as a Potential Corrosion Inhibitor for Mild Steel in HCl
Materials 2013, 6(4), 1420-1431; doi:10.3390/ma6041420
Received: 6 January 2013 / Revised: 15 February 2013 / Accepted: 1 March 2013 / Published: 2 April 2013
Cited by 15 | PDF Full-text (523 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
2-(1-methyl-4-((E)-(2-methylbenzylidene)amino)-2-phenyl-1H-pyrazol-3(2H)-ylidene)-hydrazineecarbothioamide (HCB) was synthesized as a corrosion inhibitor from the reaction of 4-aminoantipyrine, thiosemicarbazide and 2-methylbenzaldehyde. The corrosion inhibitory effects of HCB on mild steel in 1.0 M HCl were investigated using potentiodynamic polarization (PDP) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The results showed
[...] Read more.
2-(1-methyl-4-((E)-(2-methylbenzylidene)amino)-2-phenyl-1H-pyrazol-3(2H)-ylidene)-hydrazineecarbothioamide (HCB) was synthesized as a corrosion inhibitor from the reaction of 4-aminoantipyrine, thiosemicarbazide and 2-methylbenzaldehyde. The corrosion inhibitory effects of HCB on mild steel in 1.0 M HCl were investigated using potentiodynamic polarization (PDP) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The results showed that HCB inhibited mild steel corrosion in acidic solution and inhibition efficiency increased with an increase in the concentration of the inhibitor. The inhibition efficiency was up to 96.5% at 5.0 mM. Changes in the impedance parameters suggested that HCB adsorbed on the surface of mild steel, leading to the formation of a protective film. The novel corrosion inhibitor synthesized in the present study was characterized using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectral data. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Corrosion Monitoring and Control)

Other

Jump to: Research

Open AccessConcept Paper Characterisation of Crevice and Pit Solution Chemistries Using Capillary Electrophoresis with Contactless Conductivity Detector
Materials 2013, 6(10), 4345-4360; doi:10.3390/ma6104345
Received: 4 July 2013 / Revised: 18 September 2013 / Accepted: 23 September 2013 / Published: 30 September 2013
Cited by 3 | PDF Full-text (578 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The ability to predict structural degradation in-service is often limited by a lack of understanding of the evolving chemical species occurring within a range of different microenvironments associated with corrosion sites. Capillary electrophoresis (CE) is capable of analysing nanolitre solution volumes with widely
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The ability to predict structural degradation in-service is often limited by a lack of understanding of the evolving chemical species occurring within a range of different microenvironments associated with corrosion sites. Capillary electrophoresis (CE) is capable of analysing nanolitre solution volumes with widely disparate concentrations of ionic species, thereby producing accurate and reliable results for the analysis of the chemical compositions found within microenvironment corrosion solutions, such as those found at crevice and pit corrosion sites. In this study, CE with contactless conductivity detection (CCD) has been used to characterize pitting and crevice corrosion solution chemistries for the first time. By using the capillary electrophoresis with contactless conductivity detection (CE-CCD) system, direct and simultaneous detection of seven metal cations (Cu2+, Ni2+, Fe3+, Fe2+, Cr3+, Mn2+, and Al3+) and chloride anions was achieved with a buffer solution of 10 mM 2,6-pyridinedicarboxylic acid and 0.5 mM cetyltrimethylammonium hydroxide at pH 4 using a pre-column complexation method. The detection limits obtained for the metal cations and chloride anions were 100 and 10 ppb, respectively. The CE-CCD methodology has been demonstrated to be a versatile technique capable of speciation and quantifying the ionic species generated within artificial pit (a pencil electrode) and crevice corrosion geometries for carbon steels and nickel-aluminium bronze, thus allowing the evolution of the solution chemistry to be assessed with time and the identification of the key corrosion analyte targets for structural health monitoring. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Corrosion Monitoring and Control)

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