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Special Issue "Nanocomposites of Polymers and Inorganic Particles 2011"

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A special issue of Materials (ISSN 1996-1944).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (28 February 2011)

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Dr. Laïla Raki (Website)

Concrete Materials and Structural Technologies, Institute for Research in Construction, National Research Council Canada, 1200 Montreal Road, M-20, Ottawa, ON, K1A 0R6, Canada
Fax: +1 613 9545984
Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Claudio Nicolini

Nanoworld Institute – CIRSDNNOB and Biophysics Division, University of Genova, Corso Europa 30, 16132 Genoa, Italy

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

In recent years, polymer-nanoparticle composites have attracted the interest of a number of researchers, mainly because of their hybrid properties derived from different components. In the materials industry, the development of polymer nanocomposites is rapidly expanding as a multidisciplinary research activity and is gaining momentum in mainstream commercial applications. The mixing of polymers, including biopolymers and inorganic matrices, and nanoparticles is opening new routes for engineering flexible composites that exhibit unique electrical, optical, mechanical or thermal characteristics. These novel materials benefit from the synergy between nanoparticles (filler) and polymers (matrix) to tailor nanocomposite materials with new and enhanced properties. So far, commonly used fillers are inorganic particles with spherical or layered materials such as metals (e.g. silver), semiconductors (e.g. CdS) or clay minerals (e.g. montmorillonite). However, nanofibers (e.g nanotubes) also show the promise to be used as fillers. Recent advances reveal new promising pathways to tailor the single components (matrix and filler) and thereby control the macroscopic performance of the composite material. As a result, several sustainable and eco-efficient applications have been identified for these novel materials including automotive and aerospace industry as well as in construction, electrical/electronics applications and food packing.

Prof. Dr. Claudio Nicolini
Dr. Laïla Raki
Guest Editors

Keywords

  • nanoparticles
  • nanotubes
  • polymers
  • composites
  • sustainability
  • eco-efficient

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle Enhancing Crystallinity and Orientation by Hot-Stretching to Improve the Mechanical Properties of Electrospun Partially Aligned Polyacrylonitrile (PAN) Nanocomposites
Materials 2011, 4(4), 621-632; doi:10.3390/ma4040621
Received: 18 February 2011 / Revised: 10 March 2011 / Accepted: 30 March 2011 / Published: 6 April 2011
Cited by 16 | PDF Full-text (395 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Partially aligned polyacrylonitrile (PAN)-based nanofibers were electrospun from PAN and PAN/single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) in a solution of dimethylformamide (DMF) to make the nanofiber composites. The as-spun nanofibers were then hot-stretched in the oven to enhance its orientation and crystallinity. With the [...] Read more.
Partially aligned polyacrylonitrile (PAN)-based nanofibers were electrospun from PAN and PAN/single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) in a solution of dimethylformamide (DMF) to make the nanofiber composites. The as-spun nanofibers were then hot-stretched in the oven to enhance its orientation and crystallinity. With the introduction of SWNTs and by the hot-stretched process, the mechanical properties will be enhanced correspondingly. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray scattering (XRD), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), and the tensile test were used to characterize the microstructure and performances of the nanofibers. The orientation and crystallinity of the as-spun and hot-stretched nanofibers confirmed by X-ray have increased. Differential scanning calorimetry showed that the glass transition temperature of PAN increased about 3 °C by an addition of 0.75 wt% SWNTs indicating a strong interfacial interaction between PAN and SWNTs. The tensile strength and the modulus of the nanofibers increased revealing significant load transfer across the nanotube-matrix interface. For PAN nanofibers, the improved fiber alignment, orientation and crystallinity resulted in enhanced mechanical properties, such as the tensile strength and modulus of the nanofibers. It was concluded that the hot-stretched nanofiber and the PAN/SWNTs nanofibers can be used as a potential precursor to produce high-performance nanocomposites. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanocomposites of Polymers and Inorganic Particles 2011)

Review

Jump to: Research

Open AccessReview Matrices for Sensors from Inorganic, Organic, and Biological Nanocomposites
Materials 2011, 4(8), 1483-1518; doi:10.3390/ma4081483
Received: 19 May 2011 / Revised: 2 August 2011 / Accepted: 11 August 2011 / Published: 24 August 2011
Cited by 4 | PDF Full-text (1941 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Matrices and sensors resulting from inorganic, organic and biological nanocomposites are presented in this overview. The term nanocomposite designates a solid combination of a matrix and of nanodimensional phases differing in properties from the matrix due to dissimilarities in structure and chemistry. [...] Read more.
Matrices and sensors resulting from inorganic, organic and biological nanocomposites are presented in this overview. The term nanocomposite designates a solid combination of a matrix and of nanodimensional phases differing in properties from the matrix due to dissimilarities in structure and chemistry. The nanoocomposites chosen for a wide variety of health and environment sensors consist of Anodic Porous Allumina and P450scc, Carbon nanotubes and Conductive Polymers, Langmuir Blodgett Films of Lipases, Laccases, Cytochromes and Rhodopsins, Three-dimensional Nanoporous Materials and Nucleic Acid Programmable Protein Arrays. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanocomposites of Polymers and Inorganic Particles 2011)

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