E-Mail Alert

Add your e-mail address to receive forthcoming issues of this journal:

Journal Browser

Journal Browser

Special Issue "Covalent Organic Frameworks and Related Porous Organic Materials"

A special issue of Molecules (ISSN 1420-3049). This special issue belongs to the section "Organic Synthesis".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 May 2017)

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Dr. Felipe Gándara

Department of New Architectures in Materials Chemistry, Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid (ICMM-CSIC), Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz 3, Cantoblanco, Madrid, Spain
Website | E-Mail
Interests: synthesis and structural analysis of porous materials, such as metal-organic frameworks and covalent organic framework; use of porous materials in clean energy applications, including heterogeneous catalysis or gas storage
Guest Editor
Dr. Praveen Thallapally

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Physical and Computational Sciences Directorate, Richland WA, USA
Website | E-Mail
Interests: design and synthesis of heirarchical porous framework materials (MOFs, COFs, PAFs and POPs) for applications in separation, catalysis and storage

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Covalent organic frameworks (COFs) are a class of materials that exhibit crystalline, porous structures. They are built through the formation of strong covalent bonds between rigid organic building blocks, which are judiciously selected based on their geometry and chemical functionalities to produce frameworks with desired structural features. COFs might be prepared with the use of various organic condensation reactions, and they have found application in many fields of interest, such as gas storage, toxic gas capture, optoelectronics, or catalysis, among others. Furthermore, COFs have inspired the development of other porous organic materials with extended structures, which despite lacking crystallinity, they have interesting properties arising from the choice of their building components, the type of chemical bond that they form, or presence of chemical functionalities that decorate their pores. This Special Issue aims to cover different aspects of the chemistry of COFs and related porous organic materials, ranging from the study of synthetic methodologies, structural design, chemical modification, or evaluation of their properties.

Dr. Felipe Gándara
Dr. Praveen Thallapally
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Molecules is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

•    porous materials
•    structural design
•    organic materials
•    gas sorption
•    optoelectronics
•    heterogeneous catalysis

Published Papers (3 papers)

View options order results:
result details:
Displaying articles 1-3
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Review, Other

Open AccessFeature PaperArticle BILP-19—An Ultramicroporous Organic Network with Exceptional Carbon Dioxide Uptake
Molecules 2017, 22(8), 1343; doi:10.3390/molecules22081343
Received: 16 July 2017 / Revised: 6 August 2017 / Accepted: 8 August 2017 / Published: 12 August 2017
PDF Full-text (1661 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
Porous benzimidazole-based polymers (BILPs) have proven to be promising for carbon dioxide capture and storage. The polarity of their chemical structure in combination with an inherent porosity allows for adsorbing large amounts of carbon dioxide in combination with high selectivities over unpolar guest
[...] Read more.
Porous benzimidazole-based polymers (BILPs) have proven to be promising for carbon dioxide capture and storage. The polarity of their chemical structure in combination with an inherent porosity allows for adsorbing large amounts of carbon dioxide in combination with high selectivities over unpolar guest molecules such as methane and nitrogen. For this reason, among purely organic polymers, BILPs contain some of the most effective networks to date. Nevertheless, they are still outperformed by competitive materials such as metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) or metal doped porous polymers. Here, we report the synthesis of BILP-19 and its exceptional carbon dioxide uptake of up to 6 mmol•g−1 at 273 K, making the network comparable to state-of-the-art materials. BILP-19 precipitates in a particulate structure with a strongly anisotropic growth into platelets, indicating a sheet-like structure for the network. It exhibits only a small microporous but a remarkable ultra-microporous surface area of 144 m2•g−1 and 1325 m2•g−1, respectively. We attribute the exceptional uptake of small guest molecules such as carbon dioxide and water to the distinct ultra-microporosity. Additionally, a pronounced hysteresis for both guests is observed, which in combination with the platelet character is probably caused by an expansion of the interparticle space, creating additional accessible ultra-microporous pore volume. For nitrogen and methane, this effect does not occur which explains their low affinity. In consequence, Henry selectivities of 123 for CO2/N2 at 298 K and 12 for CO2/CH4 at 273 K were determined. The network was carefully characterized with solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and infrared (IR) spectroscopy, thermal gravimetry (TG) and elemental analyses as well as physisorption experiments with Ar, N2, CO2, CH4 and water. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Covalent Organic Frameworks and Related Porous Organic Materials)
Figures

Figure 1

Review

Jump to: Research, Other

Open AccessReview Crystallization of Covalent Organic Frameworks for Gas Storage Applications
Molecules 2017, 22(7), 1149; doi:10.3390/molecules22071149
Received: 13 June 2017 / Revised: 2 July 2017 / Accepted: 4 July 2017 / Published: 10 July 2017
PDF Full-text (4933 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Covalent organic frameworks (COFs) have emerged as a new class of crystalline porous materials prepared by integrating organic molecular building blocks into predetermined network structures entirely through strong covalent bonds. The consequently encountered “crystallization problem” has been conquered by dynamic covalent chemistry in
[...] Read more.
Covalent organic frameworks (COFs) have emerged as a new class of crystalline porous materials prepared by integrating organic molecular building blocks into predetermined network structures entirely through strong covalent bonds. The consequently encountered “crystallization problem” has been conquered by dynamic covalent chemistry in syntheses and reticular chemistry in materials design. In this contribution, we have reviewed the progress in the crystallization of COF materials and their hydrogen, methane and carbon dioxide gas storage properties for clean energy applications. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Covalent Organic Frameworks and Related Porous Organic Materials)
Figures

Figure 1

Other

Jump to: Research, Review

Open AccessFeature PaperPerspective Covalent Organic Frameworks—Organic Chemistry Beyond the Molecule
Molecules 2017, 22(9), 1575; doi:10.3390/molecules22091575
Received: 5 September 2017 / Revised: 6 September 2017 / Accepted: 13 September 2017 / Published: 19 September 2017
PDF Full-text (1461 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The synthesis of organic molecules has at its core, purity, definitiveness of structure, and the ability to access specific atoms through chemical reactions. When considering extended organic structures, covalent organic frameworks (COFs) stand out as a true extension of molecular organic chemistry to
[...] Read more.
The synthesis of organic molecules has at its core, purity, definitiveness of structure, and the ability to access specific atoms through chemical reactions. When considering extended organic structures, covalent organic frameworks (COFs) stand out as a true extension of molecular organic chemistry to the solid state, because these three fundamental attributes of molecular organic chemistry are preserved. The fact that COFs are porous provides confined space within which molecules can be further modified and controlled. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Covalent Organic Frameworks and Related Porous Organic Materials)
Figures

Figure 1

Journal Contact

MDPI AG
Molecules Editorial Office
St. Alban-Anlage 66, 4052 Basel, Switzerland
E-Mail: 
Tel. +41 61 683 77 34
Fax: +41 61 302 89 18
Editorial Board
Contact Details Submit to Molecules Edit a special issue Review for Molecules
logo
loading...
Back to Top