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Special Issue "Advances in Sport and Performance Nutrition"

A special issue of Nutrients (ISSN 2072-6643).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 15 August 2018

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Antonio Paoli

Department of Biomedical Sciences, University of Padova, Padova, Italy
Website | E-Mail
Interests: resistance training; metabolism; fat loss; skeletal muscle physiology; fitness; muscle hypertrophy; fasting; ketogenic diet

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Sport nutrition is a quickly-evolving and broad research field: From hydration to meal timing, and from protein needs to recovery strategies. Athletes and coaches need science-based answers to their main question: “How can I improve my performance through nutrition?” Unfortunately social media often suggests unproven and non-science-based nutrition protocols and supplements.

The design of successful strategies to preserve health and long-term performance requires a clear understanding of the contextual influences of training and nutrition in athletes, and of the complexity of training periodization. Indeed, diet and supplementation support should be periodized, taking into account the needs of daily training sessions and the specificity of each sport and performance model. Moreover, nutrient timing, quantity, and quality, and the real effectiveness of the numerous supplements available on the market are issues that are worthy to be investigated further. In addition, the usefulness of different nutritional approaches in sport (paleodiet, ketogenic diet, fasting protocols) deserves a deeper discussion.

This Special Issue of Nutrients, entitled " Advances in Sport and Performance Nutrition", welcomes the submission of manuscripts describing with either original research or systematic reviews and meta-analyses.

Potential topics may include, but are not limited to:

  • Protein needs in athletes
  • Carbohydrates for athletes
  • Fats for athletes
  • Nutrients timing for performance and recovery
  • Hydration for athletes
  • Natural products and sport
  • Sport Nutrition and health
  • Weight loss and dietary strategies in sport
  • Supplements for strength and muscle hypertrophy
  • Supplements for endurance athletes
Prof. Dr. Antonio Paoli
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Nutrients is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Sport Nutrition
  • Protein
  • Supplements
  • Hydration
  • Performance
  • Herbal supplements

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle Effects of Whey Protein Hydrolysate Ingestion on Postprandial Aminoacidemia Compared with a Free Amino Acid Mixture in Young Men
Nutrients 2018, 10(4), 507; doi:10.3390/nu10040507 (registering DOI)
Received: 27 February 2018 / Revised: 10 April 2018 / Accepted: 17 April 2018 / Published: 19 April 2018
PDF Full-text (1159 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
To stimulate muscle protein synthesis, it is important to increase the plasma levels of essential amino acids (EAA), especially leucine, by ingesting proteins. Protein hydrolysate ingestion can induce postprandial hyperaminoacidemia; however, it is unclear whether protein hydrolysate is associated with higher levels of
[...] Read more.
To stimulate muscle protein synthesis, it is important to increase the plasma levels of essential amino acids (EAA), especially leucine, by ingesting proteins. Protein hydrolysate ingestion can induce postprandial hyperaminoacidemia; however, it is unclear whether protein hydrolysate is associated with higher levels of aminoacidemia compared with a free amino acid mixture when both are ingested orally. We assessed the effects of whey protein hydrolysate (WPH) ingestion on postprandial aminoacidemia, especially plasma leucine levels, compared to ingestion of a free amino acid mixture. This study was an open-label, randomized, 4 × 4 Latin square design. After 12–15 h of fasting, 11 healthy young men ingested the WPH (3.3, 5.0, or 7.5 g of protein) or the EAA mixture (2.5 g). Blood samples were collected before ingestion and at time points from 10 to 120 min after ingestion, and amino acids, insulin, glucose and insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) concentrations in plasma were measured. Even though the EAA mixture and 5.0 g of the WPH contained similar amounts of EAA and leucine, the WPH was associated with significantly higher plasma EAA and leucine levels. These results suggest that the WPH can induce a higher level of aminoacidemia compared with a free amino acid mixture when both are ingested orally. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Sport and Performance Nutrition)
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Open AccessArticle Effects of Low Versus Moderate Glycemic Index Diets on Aerobic Capacity in Endurance Runners: Three-Week Randomized Controlled Crossover Trial
Nutrients 2018, 10(3), 370; doi:10.3390/nu10030370
Received: 22 January 2018 / Revised: 22 February 2018 / Accepted: 12 March 2018 / Published: 17 March 2018
PDF Full-text (808 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
The glycemic index (GI) of ingested carbohydrates may influence substrate oxidation during exercise and athletic performance. Therefore, the aim of this study was to assess the effect of low- and moderate-GI three-week diets on aerobic capacity and endurance performance in runners. We conducted
[...] Read more.
The glycemic index (GI) of ingested carbohydrates may influence substrate oxidation during exercise and athletic performance. Therefore, the aim of this study was to assess the effect of low- and moderate-GI three-week diets on aerobic capacity and endurance performance in runners. We conducted a randomized crossover feeding study of matched diets differing only in GI (low vs. moderate) in 21 endurance-trained runners. Each participant consumed both, low- (LGI) and moderate-GI (MGI) high-carbohydrate (~60%) and nutrient-balanced diets for three weeks each. At the beginning and end of each diet, participants had their aerobic capacity and body composition measured and performed a 12-min running test. After LGI, time to exhaustion during incremental cycling test (ICT) and distance covered in the 12-min run were significantly increased. The MGI diet led to an increase in maximal oxygen uptake ( V ˙ O2max), but no performance benefits were found after the MGI diet. The LGI and MGI diets improved time and workload at gas exchange threshold (GET) during ICT. The results indicate that a three-week high-carbohydrate LGI diet resulted in a small but significant improvement in athletic performance in endurance runners. Observed increase in V ˙ O2max on MGI diet did not affect performance. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Sport and Performance Nutrition)
Figures

Figure 1

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