Special Issue "Glocal Religions"

A special issue of Religions (ISSN 2077-1444).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (15 October 2015)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Victor Roudometof

Department of Social and Political Sciences, University of Cyprus, Post Office Box 20537, Kallipoleos 75, Nicosia, CY-1678, Cyprus
Website | E-Mail
Interests: globalization, culture, glocalization, transnationalism

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Glocal religions involve the blending or fusion of global religious expression with local particularity. This fusion can take a variety of forms and can be expressed in different cultural milieus and historical eras. Under the heading of glocal religion are included various forms of religious or cultural syncretism. Examples include forms of indigenous religion or transnational religious groups or nationalized religious forms of belonging. While there are many forms of hybrid religiosity a glocal religious form requires that one facet of this hybridity is taken from a local setting or context. This Special Issue’s goal is to explore different facets of glocal religion. It invites papers that focus on global-local or glocal religion. Contributions from all religious traditions and all continents are welcome. The theme of glocal religion has been in circulation for several years and under a variety of labels (syncretism, hybrid religion, vernacular religion, etc.). This Special Issue aims to offer the opportunity to focus the various approaches more intensely into this particular area of inquiry and to advance and relate arguments within the literature in order to offer a comprehensive treatment of this research agenda.

The participants of session on Glocal Religions of the 2015 ISSR congress are invited to publish their extended conference papers in this Special Issue without Article Processing Charges.

Session Title: Glocal Religions, for the 2015 biannual congress of the International Society for Sociology of Religion

Deadline for paper proposals: 15 December 2014

For more information, please visit the conference website at http://www.sisr-issr.org/English/Conferences/Conferences.htm

Dr. Victor Roudometof
Guest Editor

References:

Victor Roudometof. Globalization and Orthodox Christianity: The transformations of a religious tradition. London and New York: Routledge, 2014.
Victor Roudometof. ‘The Glocalizations of Eastern Orthodox Christianity.’ European Journal of Social Theory 2013 (16) 2: 226-45.
R. Robertson & W. Garret, eds. Religion and the Global Order. New York: Paragon, 1991.
Manuel A. Vasquez, and Marie F. Marquardt. Globalizing the Sacred: Religion across the Americas. Rutgers University Press, 2003.
Peter Beyer. Religion in the Context of Globalization. London and New York: Routledge, 2013.
Margit Warburg. Citizens of the World: A History and Sociology of the Bahaʹis from a Globalisation. Leiden: Brill, 2006.
Ugo Dessi. Japanese Religions and Globalization. London: Routledge, 2013.
P. Levitt. God Needs No Passport: Immigrants and the Changing American Religious Landscape. The New Press, 2007.

Manuscript Submission Information

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Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a double-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Religions is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

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Keywords

  • Glocal
  • Global
  • Local
  • hybrid
  • transnational
  • transcultural
  • syncretism
  • indigenous
  • vernacular

Published Papers (9 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle Globalization and Orthodox Christianity: A Glocal Perspective
Religions 2018, 9(7), 216; https://doi.org/10.3390/rel9070216
Received: 14 June 2018 / Revised: 9 July 2018 / Accepted: 10 July 2018 / Published: 12 July 2018
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Abstract
This article analyses the topic of Globalization and Orthodox Christianity. Starting with Victor Roudometof’s work (2014b) dedicated to this subject, the author’s views are compared with some of the main research of social scientists on the subject of sociological theory and Eastern Orthodoxy.
[...] Read more.
This article analyses the topic of Globalization and Orthodox Christianity. Starting with Victor Roudometof’s work (2014b) dedicated to this subject, the author’s views are compared with some of the main research of social scientists on the subject of sociological theory and Eastern Orthodoxy. The article essentially has a twofold aim. Our intention will be to explore this new area of research and to examine its value in the study of this religion and, secondly, to further investigate the theory of religious glocalization and to advocate the fertility of Roudometof’s model of four glocalizations in current social scientific debate on Orthodox Christianity. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Glocal Religions)
Open AccessArticle Glocalization and Religious Communication in the Roman Empire: Two Case Studies to Reconsider the Local and the Global in Religious Material Culture
Religions 2017, 8(8), 140; https://doi.org/10.3390/rel8080140
Received: 18 July 2017 / Revised: 27 July 2017 / Accepted: 31 July 2017 / Published: 3 August 2017
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Abstract
Over the period in which the ancient Roman empire grew to its greatest extent, religion in the provinces underwent change. In this article, the author argues that glocalization as an explicit modern conceptual framework has added value to the analysis of religious material
[...] Read more.
Over the period in which the ancient Roman empire grew to its greatest extent, religion in the provinces underwent change. In this article, the author argues that glocalization as an explicit modern conceptual framework has added value to the analysis of religious material culture. First, the glocalization model is discussed in the context of a wider debate on the biased concept of Romanization. Second, a rationale is presented for interpreting Roman religious change with a glocalization perspective. Third, two concrete bodies of archaeological source material are re-interpreted within the glocalization framework: first the little studied rural sanctuary of Dhronecken near ancient Trier and second a particular form of religious gifts that appeared on an empire-wide scale as a ritual with respect to the salus, the well-being of the emperor. Based on the application of the glocalization framework to these sources, the author concludes that religious material culture in these cases can be seen as a process in which new forms of religious communication were created out of an interrelated and ongoing process of local and global cultural expressions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Glocal Religions)
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Open AccessArticle Glocal Religion and Feeling at Home: Ethnography of Artistry in Finnish Orthodox Liturgy
Religions 2017, 8(2), 23; https://doi.org/10.3390/rel8020023
Received: 19 December 2016 / Accepted: 9 February 2017 / Published: 13 February 2017
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Abstract
This paper adapts a glocalization framework in a transnational, anthropological exploration of liturgy in the Orthodox Church of Finland (OCF). It draws on long-term ethnographic fieldwork and interviews with participants of liturgy from Finnish, Russian, and Greek cultural and linguistic backgrounds. The main
[...] Read more.
This paper adapts a glocalization framework in a transnational, anthropological exploration of liturgy in the Orthodox Church of Finland (OCF). It draws on long-term ethnographic fieldwork and interviews with participants of liturgy from Finnish, Russian, and Greek cultural and linguistic backgrounds. The main argument of the paper is that generic processes of nationalization and transnationalization are not mutually exclusive in practitioners’ experiences of liturgy in OCF, but rather generate a glocal space that incorporates Finnish, Russian, Karelian, and Byzantine elements. Individuals artistically engage with glocal liturgy on sensorial, cognitive, social, and semantic levels. What is important for the participants is a therapeutic sense that comes from a feeling of ‘being at home’, metaphorically, spiritually, and literally. People’s ongoing, creative work constitutes Orthodoxy as their national and transnational home. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Glocal Religions)
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Open AccessFeature PaperArticle Japanese Buddhism, Relativization, and Glocalization
Religions 2017, 8(1), 12; https://doi.org/10.3390/rel8010012
Received: 9 October 2016 / Revised: 19 December 2016 / Accepted: 9 January 2017 / Published: 18 January 2017
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Abstract
Within the field of study on Japanese religions, the issue of globalization tends to be associated with the missionary activities of some successful new religious movements, and there is a certain reluctance to approach analytically the dynamics of glocalization/hybridization and the power issues
[...] Read more.
Within the field of study on Japanese religions, the issue of globalization tends to be associated with the missionary activities of some successful new religious movements, and there is a certain reluctance to approach analytically the dynamics of glocalization/hybridization and the power issues at stake. In this article, I address these and other related problems by taking my cue from the relativizing effects of globalization and a working definition of religion based on the concept of authority. To this aim, I focus on two case studies. The first concerns the ongoing greening of Japanese Buddhism. The second revolves around the adoption of meditational techniques by priests and lay practitioners in Hawaiian Shin Buddhism. My findings show that there are at least four factors underlying the glocalization of Japanese Buddhism, that is, global consciousness, resonance with the local tradition, decontextualization, and quest for power. Moreover, they indicate that it is possible to distinguish between two types of glocalization (glocalization and chauvinistic glocalization) and two configurations of glocalization (juxtaposition and integration). Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Glocal Religions)
Open AccessFeature PaperArticle Glocalization and the Marketing of Christianity in Early Modern Southeast Asia
Religions 2017, 8(1), 7; https://doi.org/10.3390/rel8010007
Received: 5 October 2016 / Revised: 14 December 2016 / Accepted: 30 December 2016 / Published: 10 January 2017
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Abstract
The expansion of European commercial interests into Southeast Asia during the early modern period was commonly justified by the biblical injunction to spread Christian teachings, and by the “civilizing” influences it was said to foster. In focusing on areas where Christianity gained a
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The expansion of European commercial interests into Southeast Asia during the early modern period was commonly justified by the biblical injunction to spread Christian teachings, and by the “civilizing” influences it was said to foster. In focusing on areas where Christianity gained a foothold or, in the Philippines and Timor Leste, became the dominant faith, this article invokes the marketing concept of “glocalization”, frequently applied to the sociology of religion. It argues that the historical beginnings of the processes associated with the global/local interface of Christianity are situated in the sixteenth century, when Europe, Asia and the Americas were finally linked through maritime connections. Christian missionizing was undertaken with the assumption that the European-based “brand” of beliefs and practices could be successfully transported to a very different environment. However, the application of these ideas was complicated by the goal of imposing European economic control, by the local resistance thus generated, and by competition with other religions and among Christians themselves. In this often antagonistic environment, the degree to which a global product could be “repackaged” and “glocalized” so that it was appealing to consumers in different cultural environments was always constrained, even among the most sympathetic purveyors. As a result, the glocalization of Christianity set up “power-laden tensions” which both global institutions and dispersed consumers continue to negotiate. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Glocal Religions)
Open AccessFeature PaperArticle Glocalization and Transnationalization in (neo)-Mayanization Processes: Ethnographic Case Studies from Mexico and Guatemala
Religions 2016, 7(2), 17; https://doi.org/10.3390/rel7020017
Received: 14 October 2015 / Revised: 28 December 2015 / Accepted: 30 December 2015 / Published: 15 February 2016
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (238 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
In this article, the author focuses on the field of neo-Mayanity and its current transformations. She analyzes these transformations using a historico-ethnographic approach, which includes two phases. The first one consists in reconstructing the historical development of the “Mayan” category in two different
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In this article, the author focuses on the field of neo-Mayanity and its current transformations. She analyzes these transformations using a historico-ethnographic approach, which includes two phases. The first one consists in reconstructing the historical development of the “Mayan” category in two different social contexts. The second one focuses on current narrative and imageries produced around this category, stemming from ethnographic fieldwork in Mexico and Guatemala. Since the “2012 phenomenon”, in both countries, the accelerating transnationalization of the religious leaders has triggered a resignification of contents through various logics of rearrangement, innovation, cohabitation and glocalization. Finally, she demonstrates that the variations in the different ethnographies are linked with the religious leaders’ biographies and the modes of signification of the “Mayan” category—influenced by the socio-historical contexts of production. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Glocal Religions)
Open AccessFeature PaperArticle Sensing Hinduism: Lucian-Indian Funeral “Feast” as Glocalized Ritual1
Religions 2016, 7(1), 8; https://doi.org/10.3390/rel7010008
Received: 15 October 2015 / Revised: 17 December 2015 / Accepted: 24 December 2015 / Published: 6 January 2016
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Abstract
Migrant narratives of Indo-Caribbean religious practices in the smaller island states of the Caribbean are rare, and that Diaspora’s funerary traditions are even less explored. This scholarly lacuna is addressed here by using data from ethnographic research conducted in St. Lucia to examine
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Migrant narratives of Indo-Caribbean religious practices in the smaller island states of the Caribbean are rare, and that Diaspora’s funerary traditions are even less explored. This scholarly lacuna is addressed here by using data from ethnographic research conducted in St. Lucia to examine the funerary ritual of a Lucian-Indian “feast” through the multidisciplinary lens of glocalization. Specifically, we investigate the following: (a) ways that the diasporic identity of Lucian-Indians has been adapted and re-configured within a local-global nexus; (b) the extent to which there has been a local construction of a distinct socio-spatial identity among Lucian-Indians, one retaining “Hinduness” even as they assimilated into the larger St. Lucian society; and (c) whether glocal characteristics can be identified in the performance of a particular funeral feast. Following Roudometof, we posit that many aspects of a Lucian-Indian ethno-religious funerary ritual demonstrate indigenized and transnational glocalization. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Glocal Religions)
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Open AccessFeature PaperArticle “This Is Our Jerusalem”: Early American Evangelical Localizations of the Hebraic Republic
Religions 2016, 7(1), 4; https://doi.org/10.3390/rel7010004
Received: 16 October 2015 / Revised: 17 December 2015 / Accepted: 20 December 2015 / Published: 28 December 2015
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Abstract
This paper examines how evangelical pastors applied Protestant notions of a Hebraic Republic for their parishioners as America transitioned from a colonial frontier to a new republic. As the American constitutions took shape during and after the Revolution, many evangelical pastors argued that
[...] Read more.
This paper examines how evangelical pastors applied Protestant notions of a Hebraic Republic for their parishioners as America transitioned from a colonial frontier to a new republic. As the American constitutions took shape during and after the Revolution, many evangelical pastors argued that America emulated or was inspired by the Israelite polity as described by the Old Testament. America and its institutions thus became a reincarnated Hebraic Republic, a new “city on a hill”, and a new Jerusalem. Originally these pastors drew on a broader, global movement that was shaping republican attempts at reform in Europe, but as they localized the biblical model to their own particular experiences, they brought new meaning to it and exported the transformed model back out to the world. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Glocal Religions)
Open AccessFeature PaperArticle Glocalization of “Christian Social Responsibility”: The Contested Legacy of the Lausanne Movement among Neo-Evangelicals in South Korea1
Religions 2015, 6(4), 1391-1410; https://doi.org/10.3390/rel6041391
Received: 16 October 2015 / Revised: 26 November 2015 / Accepted: 2 December 2015 / Published: 9 December 2015
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (264 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
This paper examines the contested legacy of the First Lausanne Congress in South Korean neo-evangelical communities. In response to growing political and social conflicts in the Global South during the 1960s and 1970s, thousands of evangelical leaders from more than 150 countries gathered
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This paper examines the contested legacy of the First Lausanne Congress in South Korean neo-evangelical communities. In response to growing political and social conflicts in the Global South during the 1960s and 1970s, thousands of evangelical leaders from more than 150 countries gathered at Lausanne, Switzerland, in 1974 to discuss the proper relationship between evangelism and social action. The meeting culminated with the proclamation of the Lausanne Covenant, which affirmed both evangelism and public involvement as essential elements of the Christian faith. However, the absence of practical guidelines in the Covenant opened the door for all sorts of evangelical social activism, whether from the Evangelical Right or the Evangelical Left, for years to come. In light of such diverse ramifications of the Congress at both the global and local level, this paper explores the various ways in which the idea of “Christian social responsibility” has been interpreted and implemented by two distinct generations of neo-evangelical social activists in contemporary South Korea in relation to their respective socio-historical experiences of the Cold War and the 1980s democratic movement. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Glocal Religions)
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