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Special Issue "Biological Treatment of Wastewater"

A special issue of Water (ISSN 2073-4441).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 September 2017)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Dr. Giuseppe Olivieri

Università degli Studi di Napoli Federico II, Wageningen University and Research
Website | E-Mail
Interests: biorefinery; algae; bioprocess; techno-economic analysis; biofuel; industrial biotechnology

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The objective of this Special Issue is to update the status of biological treatment of wastewater, focusing on novelty in: Primary/secondary/tertiary treatment steps, equipment configuration, process design, new biocatalysts/microorganisms, treatment of special hazardous wastes, and integrated physical/chemical/biological processes, such as biological filters/membranes. Critical analyses, defining appropriate key performance indicators, such as pollutant abatement, secondary products formation, the whole cost of the process, and energy consumption are strongly encouraged. Special attention is also given to process analyses in terms of techno-economic, life-cycle assessment, and new legislation on this topic. Comparisons to parallel advanced chemical and physical treatments, such as advanced oxidation and electric techniques, are also appreciated Contributions will be of great value to companies and government agencies operating in the environmental sector.

Dr. Giuseppe Olivieri
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Water is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Biological treatment

  • Biofilter/biomembrane

  • New/hazardous pollutant abatement

  • Biocatalysts

  • Integrated physico/chemical/biological treatment

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle Study on Effects of Electron Donors on Phosphine Production from Anaerobic Activated Sludge
Water 2017, 9(8), 563; doi:10.3390/w9080563
Received: 12 June 2017 / Revised: 13 July 2017 / Accepted: 24 July 2017 / Published: 30 July 2017
PDF Full-text (1298 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The effects of different types and concentrations of electron donors (glucose, starch, methanol and sodium acetate) on the formation of phosphine from anaerobic activated sludge that has been domesticated for a prolonged period were studied in small batch experiments. The results show that
[...] Read more.
The effects of different types and concentrations of electron donors (glucose, starch, methanol and sodium acetate) on the formation of phosphine from anaerobic activated sludge that has been domesticated for a prolonged period were studied in small batch experiments. The results show that types and concentrations of electron donor have significant effects on the production of phosphine from anaerobic activated sludge. Among them, glucose was the most favourable electron donor, whereas sodium acetate was the least favourable electron donor for the removal of phosphorus and the production of phosphine. Higher concentrations of electron donors were more favourable for the reduction of phosphate into phosphine, and supplying more than nine times the amount of electron donor as theoretically required for the reduction of phosphate into phosphine was favourable for the production of phosphine. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biological Treatment of Wastewater)
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Open AccessArticle Characteristics and Biodegradability of Wastewater Organic Matter in Municipal Wastewater Treatment Plants Collecting Domestic Wastewater and Industrial Discharge
Water 2017, 9(6), 409; doi:10.3390/w9060409
Received: 7 April 2017 / Revised: 8 May 2017 / Accepted: 2 June 2017 / Published: 8 June 2017
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (1893 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Municipal wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) in Korea collect and treat not only domestic wastewater, but also discharge from industrial complexes. However, some industrial discharges contain a large amount of non-biodegradable organic matter, which cannot be treated properly in a conventional biological WWTP. This
[...] Read more.
Municipal wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) in Korea collect and treat not only domestic wastewater, but also discharge from industrial complexes. However, some industrial discharges contain a large amount of non-biodegradable organic matter, which cannot be treated properly in a conventional biological WWTP. This study aimed to investigate the characteristics and biodegradability of the wastewater organic matter contained in the industrial discharges and to examine the fate of the industrial discharges in a biological WWTP. In contrast to most previous studies targeting a specific group of organic compounds or traditional water quality indices, such as biological oxygen demand (BOD) and chemical oxygen demand (COD), this study was purposed to quantify and characterize the biodegradable and nonbiodegradable fractions of the wastewater organic matter. Chemical oxygen demand (COD) fractionation tests and fluorescence spectroscopy revealed that the industrial discharge from dyeing or pulp mill factories contained more non-biodegradable soluble organic matter than did the domestic wastewater. Statistical analysis on the WWTPs’ monitoring data indicated that the industrial discharge containing non-biodegradable soluble organic matter was not treated effectively in a biological WWTP, but was escaping from the system. Thus, industrial discharge that contained non-biodegradable soluble organic matter was a major factor in the decrease in biodegradability of the discharge, affecting the ultimate fate of wastewater organic matter in a biological WWTP. Further application of COD fractionation and fluorescence spectroscopy to wastewaters, with various industrial discharges, will help scientists and engineers to better design and operate a biological WWTP, by understanding the fate of wastewater organic matter. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biological Treatment of Wastewater)
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