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Nutrients 2017, 9(4), 405; doi:10.3390/nu9040405

Fructose Consumption in the Development of Obesity and the Effects of Different Protocols of Physical Exercise on the Hepatic Metabolism

1
Laboratory of Molecular Biology of Exercise (LaBMEx), School of Applied Science, University of Campinas, 13484-350 Limeira, Brazil
2
Department of Nutrition, Harvard T. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, MA 02115, USA
3
Department of Social and Administrative Sciences, MCPHS University, Boston, MA 02115, USA
4
Laboratory of Nutritional Genomics (LABGeN), School of Applied Science, University of Campinas, 13484-350 Limeira, Brazil
5
School of Physical Education and Sport of Ribeirão Preto, University of São Paulo, 14049-900 Ribeirão Preto, Brazil
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 27 February 2017 / Revised: 3 April 2017 / Accepted: 6 April 2017 / Published: 20 April 2017
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Abstract

Fructose consumption has been growing exponentially and, concomitant with this, the increase in the incidence of obesity and associated complications has followed the same behavior. Studies indicate that fructose may be a carbohydrate with greater obesogenic potential than other sugars. In this context, the liver seems to be a key organ for understanding the deleterious health effects promoted by fructose consumption. Fructose promotes complications in glucose metabolism, accumulation of triacylglycerol in the hepatocytes, and alterations in the lipid profile, which, associated with an inflammatory response and alterations in the redox state, will imply a systemic picture of insulin resistance. However, physical exercise has been indicated for the treatment of several chronic diseases. In this review, we show how each exercise protocol (aerobic, strength, or a combination of both) promote improvements in the obesogenic state created by fructose consumption as an improvement in the serum and liver lipid profile (high-density lipoprotein (HDL) increase and decrease triglyceride (TG) and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) levels) and a reduction of markers of inflammation caused by an excess of fructose. Therefore, it is concluded that the practice of aerobic physical exercise, strength training, or a combination of both is essential for attenuating the complications developed by the consumption of fructose. View Full-Text
Keywords: fructose; obesity; liver; aerobic exercise; strength exercise; combined exercise fructose; obesity; liver; aerobic exercise; strength exercise; combined exercise
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MDPI and ACS Style

Pereira, R.M.; Botezelli, J.D.; da Cruz Rodrigues, K.C.; Mekary, R.A.; Cintra, D.E.; Pauli, J.R.; da Silva, A.S.R.; Ropelle, E.R.; de Moura, L.P. Fructose Consumption in the Development of Obesity and the Effects of Different Protocols of Physical Exercise on the Hepatic Metabolism. Nutrients 2017, 9, 405.

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