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Nutrients 2017, 9(8), 869; doi:10.3390/nu9080869

Appetite and Gut Hormones Response to a Putative α-Glucosidase Inhibitor, Salacia Chinensis, in Overweight/Obese Adults: A Double Blind Randomized Controlled Trial

1
Department of Nutritional Sciences, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, NJ 08901, USA
2
The Rutgers Center for Lipid Research, New Jersey Institute for Food, Nutrition, and Health, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, NJ 08901, USA
3
Department of Medicine, Division of Endocrinology, Nutrition and Metabolism, Rutgers-Robert Wood Johnson University Hospital, New Brunswick, NJ 08901, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 22 June 2017 / Revised: 25 July 2017 / Accepted: 9 August 2017 / Published: 12 August 2017
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Abstract

Animal studies indicate Salacia reduces body weight, possibly due to its α-glucosidase inhibitor (α-GI) properties, but this has not been examined previously. In this study, a randomized, placebo-controlled, three-way cross-over design was used to evaluate whether Salacia Chinensis (SC) reduces appetite in healthy overweight/obese individuals (body mass index 28.8 ±3.6 kg/m2; 32 ± 12 years). Forty-eight participants were fasted overnight and consumed a dose of SC (300 or 500 mg) or placebo with a fixed breakfast meal at each visit. Appetite sensations, glycemic indices and gastrointestinal peptides were measured. Results indicated that SC had no effect on postprandial appetite. However, in women, hunger was reduced by SC compared to placebo at multiple time points (300 mg; p < 0.05), but not in men. Area under the curve (AUC) for serum glucose, insulin and amylin was attenuated with SC compared to placebo (p < 0.05). Glucagon like peptide-1 had two peaks after the meal, but the AUC did not differ between groups. The AUC of peak areas for peptide YY and ghrelin were greater for SC than placebo (p < 0.05). These findings indicate that Salacia decreases glycemic indices supporting its role as an α-GI, and affects certain gastrointestinal peptides suggesting it may be an appetite modulator. View Full-Text
Keywords: appetite; glycemic indices; gastrointestinal peptides; Salacia Chinensis appetite; glycemic indices; gastrointestinal peptides; Salacia Chinensis
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MDPI and ACS Style

Hao, L.; Schlussel, Y.; Fieselmann, K.; Schneider, S.H.; Shapses, S.A. Appetite and Gut Hormones Response to a Putative α-Glucosidase Inhibitor, Salacia Chinensis, in Overweight/Obese Adults: A Double Blind Randomized Controlled Trial. Nutrients 2017, 9, 869.

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