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J. Pers. Med., Volume 4, Issue 3 (September 2014), Pages 297-447

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Research

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Open AccessArticle Surveillance Recommendations in Reducing Risk of and Optimally Managing Breast Cancer-Related Lymphedema
J. Pers. Med. 2014, 4(3), 424-447; doi:10.3390/jpm4030424
Received: 1 April 2014 / Revised: 1 July 2014 / Accepted: 6 August 2014 / Published: 18 August 2014
Cited by 8 | PDF Full-text (626 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Breast cancer survivors are at increased risk for the development of breast cancer-related lymphedema (BCRL), a chronic, debilitating, and disfiguring condition that is progressive and requires lifelong self-management of symptoms. It has been reported that over 40% of the 2.5 million breast [...] Read more.
Breast cancer survivors are at increased risk for the development of breast cancer-related lymphedema (BCRL), a chronic, debilitating, and disfiguring condition that is progressive and requires lifelong self-management of symptoms. It has been reported that over 40% of the 2.5 million breast cancer survivors in the United States may meet the criteria for BCRL during their lifetimes. Ongoing surveillance, beginning with pre-operative assessment, has been effective in identifying subclinical lymphedema (LE). A prospective model for surveillance is necessary in order to detect BCRL at an early stage when there is the best chance to reduce risk or slow progression. Physical methods for monitoring and assessment, such as circumferential arm measures, perometry, bioimpedance; exercise programs; prophylactic and early-intervention compression garments; and referral for complete decongestive therapy are all interventions to consider in the development of a BCRL surveillance program. In addition, supportive-educative programs and interactive engagement for symptom self-management should also be implemented. The importance of interdisciplinary collaboration is integral to the success of an effective personalized medicine program in breast cancer-related lymphedema surveillance. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Personalized Cancer Therapy)
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Review

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Open AccessReview Re-Treatment with EGFR-TKIs in NSCLC Patients Who Developed Acquired Resistance
J. Pers. Med. 2014, 4(3), 297-310; doi:10.3390/jpm4030297
Received: 27 March 2014 / Revised: 15 April 2014 / Accepted: 4 June 2014 / Published: 25 June 2014
Cited by 5 | PDF Full-text (464 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
In the era of personalized medicine, epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibition with tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) has been a mainstay of treatment for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients with an EGFR mutation. Acquired resistance, especially substitution of methionine for threonine [...] Read more.
In the era of personalized medicine, epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibition with tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) has been a mainstay of treatment for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients with an EGFR mutation. Acquired resistance, especially substitution of methionine for threonine at position 790 (T790M), which has accounted for more than half of the cases, developed inevitably in patients who were previously treated with EGFR-TKI. At present, there is no standard treatment for patients who have developed a resistance to EGFR-TKI. Several strategies have been developed or suggested to treat such patients. This article aimsto review the EGFR-TKI re-treatment strategy and the efficacy of different generations of EGFR-TKIs in patients with acquired resistance to prior EGFR-TKI. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Personalized Cancer Therapy)
Open AccessReview A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Mobile Devices and Weight Loss with an Intervention Content Analysis
J. Pers. Med. 2014, 4(3), 311-385; doi:10.3390/jpm4030311
Received: 17 February 2014 / Revised: 28 May 2014 / Accepted: 28 May 2014 / Published: 30 June 2014
Cited by 9 | PDF Full-text (1979 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Introduction: Overweight and obesity constitute leading global public health challenges. Tackling overweight and obesity by influencing human behaviour is a complex task, requiring novel emerging health psychology interventions. The aims of this review will be to determine whether mobile devices induce weight [...] Read more.
Introduction: Overweight and obesity constitute leading global public health challenges. Tackling overweight and obesity by influencing human behaviour is a complex task, requiring novel emerging health psychology interventions. The aims of this review will be to determine whether mobile devices induce weight loss and improvements in diet and physical activity levels when compared with standard controls without a weight loss intervention or controls allocated to non-mobile device weight loss interventions. Methods: A systematic review on mobile devices and weight loss was conducted. The inclusion criteria were all randomized controlled trials with baseline and post-intervention weight measures in adult subjects >18 years of age without pre-specified co-morbidities. Mobile device specifications included modern, portable devices in the form of smartphones, PDAs, iPods, and Mp3 players. Cohen’s d for standardized differences in mean weight loss was calculated. A random effects meta-analysis was generated using Comprehensive meta-analysis software. Theories and intervention content were coded and analysed. Results: A total of 17 studies were identified, of which 12 were primary trials and 5 were secondary analyses. The meta-analysis generated a medium significant effect size of 0.430 (95% CI 0.252–0.609) (p-value ≤ 0.01), favouring mobile interventions. Throughout the systematic review, mobile devices were found to induce weight loss relative to baseline weight. When comparing them with standard no intervention controls as well as controls receiving non-mobile weight loss interventions, results favoured mobile devices for weight loss. Reductions in Body mass index, waist circumference, and percentage body fat were also found in the review. Improvements in the determinants of weight loss in the form of improved dietary intake and physical activity levels were also found. Theory appears to largely inform intervention design, with the most common theories being Social Cognitive Theory, Elaboration Likelihood Theory, Control Theory, and Goal Theory. The use of behavioural change techniques was widespread across the studies, with a minimum of five per intervention. Conclusion: Mobile devices appear to induce positive changes in the behavioural determinants of weight and subsequently are associated with weight loss. Mobile device interventions are heavily informed by theory and behaviour change techniques. The use of theory appears to effectively enhance levels of constructs targeted by interventions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Mobile Health)
Open AccessReview Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer beyond Biomarkers: The Evolving Landscape of Clinical Trial Design
J. Pers. Med. 2014, 4(3), 386-401; doi:10.3390/jpm4030386
Received: 26 March 2014 / Revised: 10 June 2014 / Accepted: 13 June 2014 / Published: 30 June 2014
Cited by 5 | PDF Full-text (467 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The approval of EGFR and ALK directed tyrosine kinase inhibitors materialized the concept of tailoring therapy on the basis of specific biomarkers for treating patients with NSCLC. Research for other biologics, although demonstrating clinical benefit, has been less successful so far for [...] Read more.
The approval of EGFR and ALK directed tyrosine kinase inhibitors materialized the concept of tailoring therapy on the basis of specific biomarkers for treating patients with NSCLC. Research for other biologics, although demonstrating clinical benefit, has been less successful so far for producing biomarkers that predict response. Blocking angiogenesis is the prototype for the agents that belong in the latter group that target specific molecules, yet they are currently approved for relatively unselected groups of patients. In order to meet the goal of personalizing care in the various settings of NSCLC, a wealth of biologics and compounds are currently being tested in clinical trials in different phases of clinical development. In a subset of the relevant studies, a biomarker perspective is appreciated. This review summarizes the clinical rationale of the major ongoing phase II and III NSCLC studies that employ targeting specific molecules with novel agents, as well as innovative strategies, and includes a comparative discussion of the different designs. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Personalized Cancer Therapy)
Open AccessReview mHealth for Smoking Cessation Programs: A Systematic Review
J. Pers. Med. 2014, 4(3), 412-423; doi:10.3390/jpm4030412
Received: 1 February 2014 / Revised: 19 June 2014 / Accepted: 23 June 2014 / Published: 18 July 2014
Cited by 5 | PDF Full-text (813 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
mHealth transforms healthcare delivery around the world due to its affordability and right time availability. It has been used for delivery of various smoking cessation programs and interventions over the past decade. With the proliferation of smartphone usage around the world, many [...] Read more.
mHealth transforms healthcare delivery around the world due to its affordability and right time availability. It has been used for delivery of various smoking cessation programs and interventions over the past decade. With the proliferation of smartphone usage around the world, many smartphone applications are being developed for curbing smoking among smokers. Various interventions like SMS, progress tracking, distractions, peer chats and others are being provided to users through smartphone applications. This paper presents a systematic review that analyses the applications of mobile phones in smoking cessations. The synthesis of the diverse concepts within the literature on smoking cessations using mobile phones provides deeper insights in the emerging mHealth landscape. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Mobile Health)

Other

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Open AccessCase Report Next Generation Sequencing As an Aid to Diagnosis and Treatment of an Unusual Pediatric Brain Cancer
J. Pers. Med. 2014, 4(3), 402-411; doi:10.3390/jpm4030402
Received: 21 March 2014 / Revised: 3 June 2014 / Accepted: 27 June 2014 / Published: 15 July 2014
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Abstract
Classification of pediatric brain tumors with unusual histologic and clinical features may be a diagnostic challenge to the pathologist. We present a case of a 12-year-old girl with a primary intracranial tumor. The tumor classification was not certain initially, and the site [...] Read more.
Classification of pediatric brain tumors with unusual histologic and clinical features may be a diagnostic challenge to the pathologist. We present a case of a 12-year-old girl with a primary intracranial tumor. The tumor classification was not certain initially, and the site of origin and clinical behavior were unusual. Genomic characterization of the tumor using a Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendment (CLIA)-certified next-generation sequencing assay assisted in the diagnosis and translated into patient benefit, albeit transient. Our case argues that next generation sequencing may play a role in the pathological classification of pediatric brain cancers and guiding targeted therapy, supporting additional studies of genetically targeted therapeutics. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Bringing Personalized Medicine into Clinical Practice 2013)

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