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Antibiotics, Volume 6, Issue 1 (March 2017)

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Editorial

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Open AccessEditorial Acknowledgement to Reviewers of Antibiotics in 2016
Antibiotics 2017, 6(1), 1; doi:10.3390/antibiotics6010001
Received: 10 January 2017 / Revised: 10 January 2017 / Accepted: 10 January 2017 / Published: 10 January 2017
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Abstract
The editors of Antibiotics would like to express their sincere gratitude to the following reviewers for assessing manuscripts in 2016.[...] Full article

Research

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Open AccessArticle Fused-Ring Oxazolopyrrolopyridopyrimidine Systems with Gram-Negative Activity
Antibiotics 2017, 6(1), 2; doi:10.3390/antibiotics6010002
Received: 6 December 2016 / Revised: 3 January 2017 / Accepted: 5 January 2017 / Published: 13 January 2017
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Abstract
Fused polyheterocyclic derivatives are available by annulation of a tetramate scaffold, and been shown to have antibacterial activity against a Gram-negative, but not a Gram-positive, bacterial strain. While the activity is not potent, these systems are structurally novel showing, in particular, a high
[...] Read more.
Fused polyheterocyclic derivatives are available by annulation of a tetramate scaffold, and been shown to have antibacterial activity against a Gram-negative, but not a Gram-positive, bacterial strain. While the activity is not potent, these systems are structurally novel showing, in particular, a high level of polarity, and offer potential for the optimization of antibacterial activity. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Antibiotic Synthesis)
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Open AccessArticle Docking into Mycobacterium tuberculosis Thioredoxin Reductase Protein Yields Pyrazolone Lead Molecules for Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus
Antibiotics 2017, 6(1), 4; doi:10.3390/antibiotics6010004
Received: 17 November 2016 / Revised: 19 January 2017 / Accepted: 23 January 2017 / Published: 28 January 2017
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Abstract
The thioredoxin/thioredoxin reductase system (Trx/TrxR) is an attractive drug target because of its involvement in a number of important physiological processes, from DNA synthesis to regulating signal transduction. This study describes the finding of pyrazolone compounds that are active against Staphylococcus aureus.
[...] Read more.
The thioredoxin/thioredoxin reductase system (Trx/TrxR) is an attractive drug target because of its involvement in a number of important physiological processes, from DNA synthesis to regulating signal transduction. This study describes the finding of pyrazolone compounds that are active against Staphylococcus aureus. Initially, the project was focused on discovering small molecules that may have antibacterial properties targeting the Mycobacterium tuberculosis thioredoxin reductase. This led to the discovery of a pyrazolone scaffold-containing compound series that showed bactericidal capability against S. aureus strains, including drug-resistant clinical isolates. The findings support continued development of the pyrazolone compounds as potential anti-S. aureus antibiotics. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Discover New Antibiotics 2016)
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Open AccessArticle Moxifloxacin Increases Heart Rate in Humans
Antibiotics 2017, 6(1), 5; doi:10.3390/antibiotics6010005
Received: 4 September 2016 / Revised: 10 December 2016 / Accepted: 25 January 2017 / Published: 5 February 2017
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Abstract
(1) Background: We assessed the effect of moxifloxacin on heart rate, and reviewed the heart rate effects of other antibiotics; (2) Methods: A total of 335 normal volunteers had 12-lead electrocardiograms recorded at multiple time points before and during treatment with
[...] Read more.
(1) Background: We assessed the effect of moxifloxacin on heart rate, and reviewed the heart rate effects of other antibiotics; (2) Methods: A total of 335 normal volunteers had 12-lead electrocardiograms recorded at multiple time points before and during treatment with moxifloxacin and with placebo in seven consecutive, thorough QT studies of crossover design; (3) Results: The average baseline heart rate across the seven studies was 61.5 bpm. The heart rate after moxifloxacin dosing was analyzed at five time points shared by all seven studies (hours 1, 2, 3, 12 and 24). The maximum mean heart rate (HR) increase for the seven studies combined was 2.4 bpm (95% CI 1.6, 3.3) at hour 2. The range of mean maximum increases among the seven studies was 2.1 to 4.3 bpm. For the seven studies combined, the increase was statistically significant at all but the 24 h time point. The maximum observed individual increase in HR was 36 bpm and the mean maximum increase was 30 ± 4.1 bpm by time point and 8 ± 6.9 bpm by subject. Many antibiotics increase HR, some several-fold more than moxifloxacin. However, clinicians and clinical investigators give little attention to this potential adverse effect in the medical literature; (4) Conclusions: The observed moxifloxacin-induced increase in HR is large enough to be clinically relevant, and it is a potentially important confounder in thorough QT studies using moxifloxacin as an active control. More attention to heart rate effects of antibiotics is warranted. Full article
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Open AccessCommunication Diminished Antimicrobial Peptide and Antifungal Antibiotic Activities against Candida albicans in Denture Adhesive
Antibiotics 2017, 6(1), 6; doi:10.3390/antibiotics6010006
Received: 6 December 2016 / Revised: 23 January 2017 / Accepted: 3 February 2017 / Published: 6 February 2017
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Abstract
The underlying causes of denture stomatitis may be related to the long-term use of adhesives, which may predispose individuals to oral candidiasis. In this study, we hypothesize that antimicrobial peptides and antifungal antibiotics have diminished anti-Candida activities in denture adhesive. To show
[...] Read more.
The underlying causes of denture stomatitis may be related to the long-term use of adhesives, which may predispose individuals to oral candidiasis. In this study, we hypothesize that antimicrobial peptides and antifungal antibiotics have diminished anti-Candida activities in denture adhesive. To show this, nine antimicrobial peptides and five antifungal antibiotics with and without 1.0% denture adhesive were incubated with Candida albicans strains ATCC 64124 and HMV4C in radial diffusion assays. In gels with 1.0% adhesive, HNP-1, HBD2, HBD3, IP-10, LL37 (only one strain), histatin 5 (only one strain), lactoferricin B, and SMAP28 showed diminished activity against C. albicans. In gels with 1.0% adhesive, amphotericin B and chlorhexidine dihydrochloride were active against both strains of C. albicans. These results suggest that denture adhesive may inactivate innate immune mediators in the oral cavity increasing the risk of C. albicans infections, but inclusion of antifungal antibiotics to denture adhesive may aid in prevention or treatment of Candida infections and denture stomatitis. Full article
Open AccessArticle Final Demonstration of the Co-Identity of Lipiarmycin A3 and Tiacumicin B (Fidaxomicin) through Single Crystal X-ray Analysis
Antibiotics 2017, 6(1), 7; doi:10.3390/antibiotics6010007
Received: 20 December 2016 / Revised: 22 January 2017 / Accepted: 30 January 2017 / Published: 8 February 2017
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Abstract
Lipiarmycin A3 and tiacumicin B possess the same chemical structure and have been considered identical till recently, when some authors have suggested the possibility of a minor difference between the chemical structures of the two antibiotics. In this work we performed a comparative
[...] Read more.
Lipiarmycin A3 and tiacumicin B possess the same chemical structure and have been considered identical till recently, when some authors have suggested the possibility of a minor difference between the chemical structures of the two antibiotics. In this work we performed a comparative X-ray analysis of lipiarmycin A3 and tiacumicin B. Although the commercial samples of the aforementioned compounds crystallize into two different crystal systems—evidently due to the different crystallization conditions—their chemical structures are identical. These results confirmed the previous assigned chemical structure of lipiarmycin A3 and its absolute configuration as well as its co-identity with the chemical structure of tiacumicin B, providing the definitive proof that these pharmaceutical compounds are identical in all respects. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Antibiotic Synthesis)
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Open AccessArticle Bulgecin A: The Key to a Broad‐Spectrum Inhibitor That Targets Lytic Transglycosylases
Antibiotics 2017, 6(1), 8; doi:10.3390/antibiotics6010008
Received: 19 December 2016 / Accepted: 13 February 2017 / Published: 22 February 2017
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Abstract
Lytic transglycosylases (Lts) are involved in recycling, cell division, and metabolism of the peptidoglycan. They have been understudied for their usefulness as potential antibacterial targets due to their high redundancy in Gram‐negative bacteria. Bulgecin A is an O‐sulphonated glycopeptide that targets primarily soluble
[...] Read more.
Lytic transglycosylases (Lts) are involved in recycling, cell division, and metabolism of the peptidoglycan. They have been understudied for their usefulness as potential antibacterial targets due to their high redundancy in Gram‐negative bacteria. Bulgecin A is an O‐sulphonated glycopeptide that targets primarily soluble lytic tranglycosylases (Slt). It has been shown that bulgecin A increases the efficacy of β‐lactams that target penicillin bindings proteins (PBPs). Here, we present the high‐resolution crystal structure of LtgA from Neisseria meningitidis strain MC58, a membrane bound homolog of Escherichia coli Slt, in complex with bulgecin A. The LtgA‐bulgecin A complex reveals the mechanism of inhibition by bulgecin A at near atomic resolution. We further demonstrate that bulgecin A is not only a potent inhibitor of LtgA, but most importantly, it restores the efficacy of β‐lactam antibiotics in strains of N. meningitidis and Neisseria gonorrhoeae that have reduced susceptibility to β‐lactams. This is particularly relevant for N. gonorrhoeae where no vaccines are available. This work illustrates how best to target dangerous pathogens using a multiple drug target approach, a new and alternative approach to fighting antibiotic resistance. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Bacterial Cell Wall as Antimicrobial Target)
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Open AccessArticle A Risk Assessment of Antibiotic Pan-Drug-Resistance in the UK: Bayesian Analysis of an Expert Elicitation Study
Antibiotics 2017, 6(1), 9; doi:10.3390/antibiotics6010009
Received: 18 November 2016 / Revised: 30 January 2017 / Accepted: 1 March 2017 / Published: 7 March 2017
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Abstract
To inform the UK antimicrobial resistance strategy, a risk assessment was undertaken of the likelihood, over a five-year time-frame, of the emergence and widespread dissemination of pan-drug-resistant (PDR) Gram-negative bacteria that would pose a major public health threat by compromising effective healthcare delivery.
[...] Read more.
To inform the UK antimicrobial resistance strategy, a risk assessment was undertaken of the likelihood, over a five-year time-frame, of the emergence and widespread dissemination of pan-drug-resistant (PDR) Gram-negative bacteria that would pose a major public health threat by compromising effective healthcare delivery. Subsequent impact over five- and 20-year time-frames was assessed in terms of morbidity and mortality attributable to PDR Gram-negative bacteraemia. A Bayesian approach, combining available data with expert prior opinion, was used to determine the probability of the emergence, persistence and spread of PDR bacteria. Overall probability was modelled using Monte Carlo simulation. Estimates of impact were also obtained using Bayesian methods. The estimated probability of widespread occurrence of PDR pathogens within five years was 0.2 (95% credibility interval (CrI): 0.07–0.37). Estimated annual numbers of PDR Gram-negative bacteraemias at five and 20 years were 6800 (95% CrI: 400–58,600) and 22,800 (95% CrI: 1500–160,000), respectively; corresponding estimates of excess deaths were 1900 (95% CrI: 0–23,000) and 6400 (95% CrI: 0–64,000). Over 20 years, cumulative estimates indicate 284,000 (95% CrI: 17,000–1,990,000) cases of PDR Gram-negative bacteraemia, leading to an estimated 79,000 (95% CrI: 0–821,000) deaths. This risk assessment reinforces the need for urgent national and international action to tackle antibiotic resistance. Full article
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Open AccessArticle Activity of Sulfa Drugs and Their Combinations against Stationary Phase B. burgdorferi In Vitro
Antibiotics 2017, 6(1), 10; doi:10.3390/antibiotics6010010
Received: 19 January 2017 / Revised: 7 March 2017 / Accepted: 14 March 2017 / Published: 22 March 2017
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Abstract
Lyme disease is a most common vector-borne disease in the US. Although the majority of Lyme patients can be cured with the standard two- to four-week antibiotic treatment, at least 10%–20% of patients continue to suffer from prolonged post-treatment Lyme disease syndrome (PTLDS).
[...] Read more.
Lyme disease is a most common vector-borne disease in the US. Although the majority of Lyme patients can be cured with the standard two- to four-week antibiotic treatment, at least 10%–20% of patients continue to suffer from prolonged post-treatment Lyme disease syndrome (PTLDS). While the cause for this is unclear, one possibility is that persisting organisms are not killed by current Lyme antibiotics. In our previous studies, we screened an FDA drug library and an NCI compound library on B. burgdorferi and found some drug hits including sulfa drugs as having good activity against B. burgdorferi stationary phase cells. In this study, we evaluated the relative activity of three commonly used sulfa drugs, sulfamethoxazole (Smx), dapsone (Dps), sulfachlorpyridazine (Scp), and also trimethoprim (Tmp), and assessed their combinations with the commonly prescribed Lyme antibiotics for activities against B. burgdorferi stationary phase cells. Using the same molarity concentration, dapsone, sulfachlorpyridazine and trimethoprim showed very similar activity against stationary phase B. burgdorferi enriched in persisters; however, sulfamethoxazole was the least active drug among the three sulfa drugs tested. Interestingly, contrary to other bacterial systems, Tmp did not show synergy in drug combinations with the three sulfa drugs at their clinically relevant serum concentrations against B. burgdorferi. We found that sulfa drugs combined with other antibiotics were more active than their respective single drugs and that four-drug combinations were more active than three-drug combinations. Four-drug combinations dapsone + minocycline + cefuroxime + azithromycin and dapsone + minocycline + cefuroxime + rifampin showed the best activity against stationary phase B. burgdorferi in these sulfa drug combinations. However, these four-sulfa-drug–containing combinations still had considerably less activity against B. burgdorferi stationary phase cells than the Daptomycin + cefuroxime + doxycycline used as a positive control which completely eradicated B. burgdorferi stationary phase cells. Future studies are needed to evaluate and optimize the sulfa drug combinations in vitro and also in animal models. Full article
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Review

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Open AccessReview Thioridazine: A Non-Antibiotic Drug Highly Effective, in Combination with First Line Anti-Tuberculosis Drugs, against Any Form of Antibiotic Resistance of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Due to Its Multi-Mechanisms of Action
Antibiotics 2017, 6(1), 3; doi:10.3390/antibiotics6010003
Received: 8 October 2016 / Revised: 29 December 2016 / Accepted: 5 January 2017 / Published: 14 January 2017
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Abstract
This review presents the evidence that supports the use of thioridazine (TZ) for the therapy of a pulmonary tuberculosis infection regardless of its antibiotic resistance status. The evidence consists of in vitro and ex vivo assays that demonstrate the activity of TZ against
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This review presents the evidence that supports the use of thioridazine (TZ) for the therapy of a pulmonary tuberculosis infection regardless of its antibiotic resistance status. The evidence consists of in vitro and ex vivo assays that demonstrate the activity of TZ against all encountered Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) regardless of its antibiotic resistance phenotype, as well as in vivo as a therapy for mice infected with multi-drug resistant strains of Mtb, or for human subjects infected with extensively drug resistant (XDR) Mtb. The mechanisms of action by which TZ brings about successful therapeutic outcomes are presented in detail. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Discover New Antibiotics 2016)
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