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Dent. J., Volume 6, Issue 1 (March 2018)

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Open AccessEditorial Restorative and Esthetic Dentistry—A Special Issue of the Dentistry Journal
Dent. J. 2018, 6(1), 5; https://doi.org/10.3390/dj6010005
Received: 25 December 2017 / Revised: 25 December 2017 / Accepted: 8 February 2018 / Published: 11 February 2018
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Abstract
Due to the development of dental materials and the esthetic requirements of patients, conservative restoration and esthetic dentistry is becoming more and more important.[...] Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Restorative and Esthetic Dentistry)
Open AccessEditorial Soft and Hard Tissue Regeneration—A Special Issue of Dentistry Journal
Dent. J. 2018, 6(1), 4; https://doi.org/10.3390/dj6010004
Received: 25 December 2017 / Revised: 25 December 2017 / Accepted: 17 January 2018 / Published: 23 January 2018
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Abstract
This Special Issue entitled “Soft and Hard Tissue Regeneration” will cover both periodontal and implant therapies.[...] Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Soft and Hard Tissue Regeneration)
Open AccessEditorial Acknowledgement to Reviewers of Dentistry Journal in 2017
Dent. J. 2018, 6(1), 3; https://doi.org/10.3390/dj6010003
Received: 19 January 2018 / Revised: 19 January 2018 / Accepted: 19 January 2018 / Published: 19 January 2018
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Abstract
Peer review is an essential part in the publication process, ensuring that Dentistry Journal maintains high quality standards for its published papers [...]
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Open AccessArticle Effectiveness of Oral Hygiene Instructions Given in Computer-Assisted Format versus a Self-Care Instructor
Dent. J. 2018, 6(1), 2; https://doi.org/10.3390/dj6010002
Received: 25 September 2017 / Revised: 27 December 2017 / Accepted: 3 January 2018 / Published: 10 January 2018
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Abstract
Background: This randomized, single-blinded, controlled study compares the effectiveness of two modes of delivering the same set of oral hygiene instructions: those loaded on a computer-assisted teaching format versus those given personally by a self-care instructor. Methods: 60 participants with mild to moderate
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Background: This randomized, single-blinded, controlled study compares the effectiveness of two modes of delivering the same set of oral hygiene instructions: those loaded on a computer-assisted teaching format versus those given personally by a self-care instructor. Methods: 60 participants with mild to moderate periodontitis were randomized to either the computer-teaching format or the self-care instructor. Plaque score and bleeding indices were assessed at baseline and at 4 week re-evaluation to compare the instructional modalities. Results: At baseline, there was no difference in the parameters between the two groups. At re-evaluation, all parameters were significantly improved compared to baseline; however, there was no difference between any parameters in the computer group versus the instructor. Plaque score was significantly different between younger and older participants, such that participants under 50 years old had lower plaque scores when they received instructions using the computer format (72.5 ± 12.6 vs. 87.2 ± 10.4; p < 0.001). Additionally, in those under-50 year olds, plaque scores were significantly better in the group using the computer format (87.2 ± 10.4 vs. 78.3 ± 15.6; p = 0.03). Conclusion: Computer teaching formats and self-care instructors are both effective means of communicating oral hygiene instructions. Computer-assisted instruction format effectiveness may amplify as the population ages. Applications of computer formats teaching oral hygiene instructions and cost effectiveness comparison studies warrant significant future investigation. Full article
Open AccessArticle Autoimmune Diseases and Oral Health: 30-Year Follow-Up of a Swedish Cohort
Dent. J. 2018, 6(1), 1; https://doi.org/10.3390/dj6010001
Received: 26 August 2017 / Revised: 19 November 2017 / Accepted: 19 December 2017 / Published: 22 December 2017
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Abstract
Oral infections up-regulate a number of systemic inflammatory reactions that, in turn, play a role in the development of systemic diseases. We investigated the association between oral health and autoimmune diseases in a cohort of Swedish adults. Hypothesis was that poor oral health
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Oral infections up-regulate a number of systemic inflammatory reactions that, in turn, play a role in the development of systemic diseases. We investigated the association between oral health and autoimmune diseases in a cohort of Swedish adults. Hypothesis was that poor oral health associates with incidence of autoimmune diseases. Overall 1676 subjects aged 30–40 years old from Stockholm County (Sweden) participated in this study in 1985. Subjects were randomly selected from the registry file of Stockholm region and were followed-up for 30 years. Their hospital and open health care admissions (World Health Organization ICD 9 and 10 codes) were recorded from the Swedish national health registers. The association between the diagnosed autoimmune disease and the oral health variables were statistically analyzed. In all, 50 patients with autoimmune diagnoses were detected from the data. Plaque index was significantly higher in the autoimmune disease group (≥median 35 (70%) vs. ˂median 872 (54%), p = 0.030). No statistical difference was found in gingival index, calculus index, missing teeth, periodontal pockets, smoking or snuff use between patients with and without autoimmune disease. Our study hypothesis was partly confirmed. The result showed that subjects with a higher plaque index, marker of poor oral hygiene, were more likely to develop autoimmune diseases in 30 years. Full article
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