Special Issue "Inclusive Development—What Does It Mean for Regions and Cities?"

A special issue of Administrative Sciences (ISSN 2076-3387).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 January 2018)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Dr. Maximilian Benner

Institute of Geography, Heidelberg University, Germany
Website | E-Mail
Interests: regional structural policy and industrial policy (incl. innovation policy); cluster policy and smart specialisation; Middle Eastern political economy; Industrialization and structural transformation in the Middle East and North Africa; tourism policy and tourism clusters

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Inclusive growth is a cross-cutting perspective currently shaping high-level discourses on economic policy. While macro-level debates concentrate on how a society's wealth should be distributed (e.g., Piketty 2014), meso-level discourses tend to focus more on specific groups within society whose economic participation is weaker than that of other, mainstream groups. For instance, research on inclusive entrepreneurship examines how to promote new business formation by groups such as women, youth, senior citizens, immigrants, ethnic minorities, or people with special needs (e.g., OECD 2016). Another dimension of meso-level research is how to mainstream inclusiveness in innovation policy, particularly in a territorial perspective (e.g., OECD 2015). This Special Issue aims to contribute to this debate in a spatial perspective. Articles should address aspects of how regions or cities can include groups with comparatively weak degrees of economic participation, and how to develop their regional or local development accordingly. The Special Issue welcomes particularly empirical work on the representation and contribution of groups, such as women, youth, senior citizens, people with special needs, immigrants, or ethnic minorities in local or regional development, as well as policy-oriented papers developing evidence-based policy conclusions for policymakers on the local and regional levels. Comparative research is encouraged.

Maximilian Benner
Guest Editor

OECD (ed.) (2015): Innovation Policies for Inclusive Growth. Paris: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development.
OECF (ed.) (2016): Inclusive Business Creation: Good Practice Compendium. Paris: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development.
Piketty, T. (2014): Capital in the Twenty-First Century. Boston: Harvard University Press.

Manuscript Submission Information

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Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Open AccessArticle Examination of the Relationships between Urban Form and Urban Public Services Expenditure in China
Adm. Sci. 2017, 7(4), 39; https://doi.org/10.3390/admsci7040039
Received: 31 July 2017 / Revised: 25 September 2017 / Accepted: 22 November 2017 / Published: 1 December 2017
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Abstract
This econometric study contributes to the ongoing debate about the costs and benefits of urban form by employing interdisciplinary means—urban planning, econometrics and public administration—to explore the relationship between urban form and urban public services expenditure. In China, particularly, rapid urbanization is accompanied
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This econometric study contributes to the ongoing debate about the costs and benefits of urban form by employing interdisciplinary means—urban planning, econometrics and public administration—to explore the relationship between urban form and urban public services expenditure. In China, particularly, rapid urbanization is accompanied by an increase of urban public services expenditure and a difference in efficiency, which undermines the promotion of urban public service development. The Chinese government has paid great attention to urban sustainable development and promoting urban public services performance; however, until recently there has been a lack of empirical studies exploring the relationship between urban public services expenditure and urban form. Thus, the present research aims to analyze this issue by using relevant indicators based on an econometric model. The results provide a promising basis for improving urban public services expenditure efficiency. Based on the urban area interpreted by remote sensing data and geographic information system, two urban form metrics, the compactness ratio and the elongation ratio, are selected and quantified to describe urban compactness and urban sprawl accurately. Panel data analyses are performed using a cross-sectional dataset of the 30 cities for the years 2007, 2010 and 2013 to assess the likelihood of association between indicators of urban form and urban public services expenditure, while controlling for other determinants, such as educational level, income per capita, degree of industrialization, and unemployment rate. The results indicate that urban elongation is positively correlated to per capita urban public services expenditure and urban compactness is insignificantly correlated to it. Thus, it is recommended that policymakers consider the relationship between urban form and public services expenditure as part of urban planning and on-going strategies to promote public service efficiency. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Inclusive Development—What Does It Mean for Regions and Cities?)
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