Special Issue "Autism Spectrum Disorder 2016"

A special issue of Behavioral Sciences (ISSN 2076-328X).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 October 2016)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Jodi Robledo, Ph.D.

College of Education, Health and Human Services, California State University San Marcos, San Marcos, CA, USA
E-Mail
Interests: autism spectrum disorder; sensory and movement differences; supportive relationships; inclusive education

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

In the past 30 years we have witnessed an enormous growth of a body of knowledge, approaches and intervention methodologies designed to address the needs of individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and similar challenges. This Special Issue will explore new understandings of autism spectrum disorder that may challenge our current understanding and definitions of ASD. Of critical importance, the issue will highlight the voices of self-advocates as voices of authority in the international discussion and research on ASD. The richness of their perspective may complement, or drastically contradict, our current understanding of ASD. In addition, this Special Issue encourages submissions on topics that remain under-researched in the field. For example, many neuroscientists and others are now stressing the signification and implications of motor and sensory difficulities in the development of children with ASD. This Special Issue aims to explore new understandings of autism that may challenge our previous definitions and understanding of ASD.

Prof. Jodi Robledo, Ph.D.
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Behavioral Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 350 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • autism spectrum disorder
  • self-advocate
  • conceptual advances
  • sensory
  • movement
  • social
  • communication
  • support
  • behavior
  • intervention methodologies

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

Open AccessFeature PaperArticle Through the Kinesthetic Lens: Observation of Social Attunement in Autism Spectrum Disorders
Behav. Sci. 2017, 7(1), 14; doi:10.3390/bs7010014
Received: 1 November 2016 / Revised: 13 March 2017 / Accepted: 14 March 2017 / Published: 18 March 2017
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Abstract
This paper will present a movement-informed perspective to social attunement in Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD). Background: Dance movement therapy (DMT) is a psychotherapeutic intervention that is used with participants with ASD in various settings. Regular clinical outcome monitoring in an outpatient setting in
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This paper will present a movement-informed perspective to social attunement in Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD). Background: Dance movement therapy (DMT) is a psychotherapeutic intervention that is used with participants with ASD in various settings. Regular clinical outcome monitoring in an outpatient setting in the Netherlands had shown positive effects on social attunement capacities in young people with ASD. However, a systematic study of the development of social attunement movement behaviors of participants with ASD throughout a DMT intervention was not yet available. Methods: A series of individual cases of DMT with young people with ASD (mean age 12.2 years.) were analyzed for changes in interpersonal movement behaviors employing video-based retrospective observation. Results: The findings were summarized in an observation scale for interpersonal movement behaviors. This scale was then tested for its applicability for the monitoring of social attunement behaviors throughout therapy. Discussion: A movement-informed perspective may be helpful to inventory changes in social attunement behaviors in participants with ASD. The relevance of a movement-informed perspective for the concept of social attunement in ASD will be discussed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Autism Spectrum Disorder 2016)
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Open AccessFeature PaperArticle Peripheral Inflammatory Markers Contributing to Comorbidities in Autism
Behav. Sci. 2016, 6(4), 29; doi:10.3390/bs6040029
Received: 22 October 2016 / Revised: 8 December 2016 / Accepted: 9 December 2016 / Published: 14 December 2016
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (1928 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
This study evaluates the contribution of peripheral biomarkers to comorbidities and clinical findings in autism. Seventeen autistic children and age-matched typically developing (AMTD), between three to nine years old were evaluated. The diagnostic followed the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders 4th
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This study evaluates the contribution of peripheral biomarkers to comorbidities and clinical findings in autism. Seventeen autistic children and age-matched typically developing (AMTD), between three to nine years old were evaluated. The diagnostic followed the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders 4th Edition (DMS-IV) and the Childhood Autism Rating Scale (CARS) was applied to classify the severity. Cytokine profile was evaluated in plasma using a sandwich type ELISA. Paraclinical events included electroencephalography (EEG) record. Statistical analysis was done to explore significant differences in cytokine profile between autism and AMTD groups and respect clinical and paraclinical parameters. Significant differences were found to IL-1β, IL-6, IL-17, IL-12p40, and IL-12p70 cytokines in individuals with autism compared with AMTD (p < 0.05). All autistic patients showed interictalepileptiform activity at EEG, however, only 37.5% suffered epilepsy. There was not a regional focalization of the abnormalities that were detectable with EEG in autistic patients with history of epilepsy. A higher IL-6 level was observed in patients without history of epilepsy with interictalepileptiform activity in the frontal brain region, p < 0.05. In conclusion, peripheral inflammatory markers might be useful as potential biomarkers to predict comorbidities in autism as well as reinforce and aid informed decision-making related to EEG findings in children with Autism spectrum disorders (ASD). Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Autism Spectrum Disorder 2016)
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Open AccessArticle “We Dance and Find Each Other”1: Effects of Dance/Movement Therapy on Negative Symptoms in Autism Spectrum Disorder
Behav. Sci. 2016, 6(4), 24; doi:10.3390/bs6040024
Received: 2 August 2016 / Revised: 3 November 2016 / Accepted: 4 November 2016 / Published: 10 November 2016
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (402 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The treatment of deficits in social interaction, a shared symptom cluster in persons with schizophrenia (negative symptoms) and autism spectrum disorder (DSM-5 A-criterion), has so far remained widely unsuccessful in common approaches of psychotherapy. The alternative approach of embodiment brings to focus body-oriented
[...] Read more.
The treatment of deficits in social interaction, a shared symptom cluster in persons with schizophrenia (negative symptoms) and autism spectrum disorder (DSM-5 A-criterion), has so far remained widely unsuccessful in common approaches of psychotherapy. The alternative approach of embodiment brings to focus body-oriented intervention methods based on a theoretic framework that explains the disorders on a more basic level than common theory of mind approaches. The randomized controlled trial at hand investigated the effects of a 10-week manualized dance and movement therapy intervention on negative symptoms in participants with autism spectrum disorder. Although the observed effects failed to reach significance at the conventional 0.05 threshold, possibly due to an undersized sample, an encouraging trend towards stronger symptom reduction in the treatment group for overall negative symptoms and for almost all subtypes was found at the 0.10-level. Effect sizes were small but clinically meaningful, and the resulting patterns were in accordance with theoretical expectations. The study at hand contributes to finding an effective treatment approach for autism spectrum disorder in accordance with the notion of embodiment. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Autism Spectrum Disorder 2016)
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Open AccessFeature PaperArticle Supportive Relationships in Autism Spectrum Disorder: Perspectives of Individuals with ASD and Supporters
Behav. Sci. 2016, 6(4), 23; doi:10.3390/bs6040023
Received: 22 August 2016 / Revised: 25 October 2016 / Accepted: 28 October 2016 / Published: 3 November 2016
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Abstract
This study explored 17 dyads of academically successful people with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) and individuals who they identified as supportive. Qualitative methods, including in-depth interviews, participant observations, and document analysis, were used to study these supportive relationships. The purpose of the study
[...] Read more.
This study explored 17 dyads of academically successful people with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) and individuals who they identified as supportive. Qualitative methods, including in-depth interviews, participant observations, and document analysis, were used to study these supportive relationships. The purpose of the study was to develop a substantive grounded theory regarding supportive relationships within the lives of individuals with ASD. A dynamic model of supportive relationships emerged, with trust, unity, and support as the three core categories of these relationships. The data suggest that the quality of the relationship between an individual with ASD and the support provider can be a critical factor within effective support. These findings suggest that there is much yet to be learned about the social world of individuals with ASD. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Autism Spectrum Disorder 2016)
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