E-Mail Alert

Add your e-mail address to receive forthcoming issues of this journal:

Journal Browser

Journal Browser

Special Issue "Sustainable Energy Innovation: Strategies to Accelerate Progress"

Quicklinks

A special issue of Energies (ISSN 1996-1073).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 September 2014)

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Professor Peter G. Taylor

Professor of Sustainable Energy Systems, Centre for Integrated Energy Research, University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT, UK
E-Mail
Phone: +44 113 343 7169
Interests: low-carbon energy transitions; energy systems modeling; energy technology innovation; energy policy analysis; energy efficiency
Guest Editor
Professor Tim Cockerill

Professor of Efficient Energy Utilisation, Centre for Integrated Energy Research, University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT, UK
E-Mail
Phone: +44 113 343 7679
Interests: energy system modeling; energy system optimization; techno-economics of energy systems; new approaches to energy system life cycle assessment; carbon capture and storage; electricity storage deployment; small scale and offshore wind

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The world is facing significant challenges to meet the energy requirements of its people in a sustainable, secure and affordable way. Successfully addressing these global energy challenges will require a cleaner, smarter and more integrated energy system. Yet progress is lagging behind what is needed to meet internationally agreed climate targets and to ensure energy security and affordability.

This special issue will focus on highlighting best practice and identifying innovative strategies to accelerate progress in sustainable energy development and deployment. The intention is to explore energy systems innovation in its widest context, embracing policy, financial, business and social as well as engineering innovation. We invite contributions on all relevant topics, and in particular:

  • the effectiveness of energy innovation systems
  • innovation trends and prospects outside the OECD
  • R&D and deployment policies for cross-cutting, supporting and demand-side technologies
  • social innovations, business models and institutions and financing
  • global technology flows and supply chains
  • strategies to support systemic sustainable energy transitions
  • the use of energy systems modelling to shed new light on any of the above

Professor Peter G. Taylor
Professor Tim Cockerill
Guest Editors

Submission

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. Papers will be published continuously (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are refereed through a peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Energies is an international peer-reviewed Open Access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1400 CHF (Swiss Francs).

Keywords

  • innovation in energy systems
  • sustainable energy
  • energy technologies
  • energy policies
  • new business models
  • financing
  • social innovation
  • supply chains

Published Papers (4 papers)

View options order results:
result details:
Displaying articles 1-4
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Open AccessArticle The Implications for Renewable Energy Innovation of Doubling the Share of Renewables in the Global Energy Mix between 2010 and 2030
Energies 2015, 8(6), 5828-5865; doi:10.3390/en8065828
Received: 10 September 2014 / Accepted: 20 May 2015 / Published: 17 June 2015
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (1219 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Benefits of increasing the renewable energy (RE) share in the total energy mix include better energy security, carbon dioxide emission reductions and improved human health. This paper identifies the potential of RE technologies and role of innovation to double the global RE share
[...] Read more.
Benefits of increasing the renewable energy (RE) share in the total energy mix include better energy security, carbon dioxide emission reductions and improved human health. This paper identifies the potential of RE technologies and role of innovation to double the global RE share from 18% to 36% between 2010 and 2030. As a first step, a Reference Case is developed based on national energy plans of 26 countries which increases the RE share to 21% by 2030. Next, the realizable potential of RE technologies is estimated beyond the Reference Case at country and sector levels. By aggregating country potentials, this paper reveals that the global RE share can double to 36% by 2030. Despite differences in starting points and resource potentials, there is a role for each country in achieving a doubling. For many countries their Reference Cases result in low RE shares and many countries are just beginning to explore ways to increase RE use. The paper identifies action areas where innovation can increase technology development and improve cost-effectiveness, thereby accelerating global RE deployment. More research is required to specify these action areas for individual countries and specific technologies, as well as to identify policy needs to address them. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainable Energy Innovation: Strategies to Accelerate Progress)
Open AccessArticle A Novel Constant-Pressure Pumped Hydro Combined with Compressed Air Energy Storage System
Energies 2015, 8(1), 154-171; doi:10.3390/en8010154
Received: 28 August 2014 / Accepted: 19 December 2014 / Published: 26 December 2014
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (838 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
As intermittent renewable energy is receiving increasing attention, the combination of intermittent renewable energy with large-scale energy storage technology is considered as an important technological approach for the wider application of wind power and solar energy. Pumped hydro combined with compressed air energy
[...] Read more.
As intermittent renewable energy is receiving increasing attention, the combination of intermittent renewable energy with large-scale energy storage technology is considered as an important technological approach for the wider application of wind power and solar energy. Pumped hydro combined with compressed air energy storage system (PHCA) is one of the energy storage systems that not only integrates the advantages but also overcomes the disadvantages of compressed air energy storage (CAES) systems and pumped hydro energy storage systems to solve the problem of energy storage in China’s arid regions. Aiming at the variable working conditions of PHCA system technology, this study proposes a new constant-pressure PHCA. The most significant characteristics of this system were that the water pump and hydroturbine work under stable conditions and this improves the working efficiency of the equipment without incurring an energy loss. In addition, the constant-pressure PHCA system was subjected to energy and exergy analysis, in expectation of exploring an attractive solution for the large-scale storage of existing intermittent renewable energy. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainable Energy Innovation: Strategies to Accelerate Progress)
Open AccessArticle The Global Surge in Energy Innovation
Energies 2014, 7(9), 5601-5623; doi:10.3390/en7095601
Received: 26 June 2014 / Revised: 8 August 2014 / Accepted: 20 August 2014 / Published: 27 August 2014
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (753 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Policymakers are seeking a transformation of the energy system driven by concerns about climate change, energy security and affordability. At the same time, emerging developments in underpinning science and engineering are opening up new possibilities across the whole technology spectrum covering renewables and
[...] Read more.
Policymakers are seeking a transformation of the energy system driven by concerns about climate change, energy security and affordability. At the same time, emerging developments in underpinning science and engineering are opening up new possibilities across the whole technology spectrum covering renewables and other supply side technologies, energy demand and energy infrastructure. This paper reviews both the “policy pull” for energy innovation activities and the “science and technology push”. It explores the expectations of a variety of organisations in both the public and private sector regarding these pressures and possibilities by assessing various scenarios and outlook exercises that have been published since 2013. It reveals a wide range of beliefs about the future development of the energy system. The paper then moves on to analyse private sector expenditure on energy research and development (R&D) and public sector budgets for energy R&D and demonstration (RD&D). This analysis demonstrates significant divergences in patterns of innovation between the private and public sectors and leads to the hypothesis that the private sector is, broadly, taking measures to reinforce the existing energy paradigm while the public sector is focusing on new energy technologies that support wider policy objectives. This pattern is consistent with past technological transitions, with innovation efforts that would transform the energy system being counteracted by countervailing efforts that reinforce the existing fossil fuel-based paradigm. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainable Energy Innovation: Strategies to Accelerate Progress)
Open AccessArticle A Novel Hybrid-Fuel Storage System of Compressed Air Energy for China
Energies 2014, 7(8), 4988-5010; doi:10.3390/en7084988
Received: 20 March 2014 / Revised: 14 July 2014 / Accepted: 23 July 2014 / Published: 4 August 2014
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (835 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Compressed air energy storage (CAES) is a large-scale technology that provides long-duration energy storage. It is promising for balancing the large-scale penetration of intermittent and dispersed sources of power, such as wind and solar power, into electric grids. The existing CAES plants utilize
[...] Read more.
Compressed air energy storage (CAES) is a large-scale technology that provides long-duration energy storage. It is promising for balancing the large-scale penetration of intermittent and dispersed sources of power, such as wind and solar power, into electric grids. The existing CAES plants utilize natural gas (NG) as fuel. However, China is rich in coal but is deficient in NG; therefore, a hybrid-fuel CAES is proposed and analyzed in this study. Based on the existing CAES plants, the hybrid-fuel CAES incorporates an external combustion heater into the power generation subsystem to heat the air from the recuperator and the air from the high-pressure air turbine. Coal is the fuel for the external combustion heater. The overall efficiency and exergy efficiency of the hybrid-fuel CAES are 61.18% and 59.84%, respectively. Given the same parameters, the cost of electricity (COE) of the hybrid-fuel CAES, which requires less NG, is $5.48/MW∙h less than that of the gas-fuel CAES. Although the proposed CAES requires a relatively high investment in the current electricity system in North China, the proposed CAES will be likely to become competitive in the market, provided that the energy supplies are improved and the large scale grid-connection of wind power is realized. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainable Energy Innovation: Strategies to Accelerate Progress)

Journal Contact

MDPI AG
Energies Editorial Office
St. Alban-Anlage 66, 4052 Basel, Switzerland
energies@mdpi.com
Tel. +41 61 683 77 34
Fax: +41 61 302 89 18
Editorial Board
Contact Details Submit to Energies
Back to Top