E-Mail Alert

Add your e-mail address to receive forthcoming issues of this journal:

Journal Browser

Journal Browser

Special Issue "Molecular Biomimetics and Materials Design"

Quicklinks

A special issue of Materials (ISSN 1996-1944).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 November 2010)

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Lyle Isaacs (Website)

Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742, USA
Fax: +1 301 314 9121
Interests: supramolecular chemistry; molecular recognition; molecular containers; molecular clips; glycoluril; cucurbit[n]urils; self-sorting; complex systems; supramolecular catalysis
Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Kwang J. Kim (Website)

Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Nevada, Reno, NV 89557, USA
Interests: electroactive polymer; ionic polymer-metal composite; metal hydride actuator

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Nature is unquestionably the pre-eminent chemist. One must only consider the myriad chemical reactions and non-covalent interactions that are ongoing simultaneous with exquisite control in both space and time to be awe inspired. A large number of chemists and biochemists are involved in the dissection of these complex biological systems by understanding the precise chemical behavior of each Natural component. Another segment of the chemical and biochemical community aims to apply the understanding of natural systems to create man-made molecules, materials, machines, and systems with complex structure and function. This special issue is dedicated to the chemistry of such biomimetic systems at the molecular, macromolecular, and materials levels. As such this special issue encompasses a broad range of topics of contemporary interest in chemistry.

Prof. Dr. Lyle Isaacs
Prof. Dr. Kwang J. Kim
Guest Editors

Keywords

  • biomimetic systems
  • stimuli responsive materials
  • polymers
  • molecular machines
  • self-assembly
  • supramolecular
  • systems
  • sensing systems
  • surface chemistry
  • systems chemistry
  • complexity

Related Special Issue

Published Papers (3 papers)

View options order results:
result details:
Displaying articles 1-3
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Review

Open AccessArticle Nanoporous Carbide-Derived Carbon Material-Based Linear Actuators
Materials 2010, 3(1), 9-25; doi:10.3390/ma3010009
Received: 30 October 2009 / Revised: 16 December 2009 / Accepted: 22 December 2009 / Published: 24 December 2009
Cited by 18 | PDF Full-text (631 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Devices using electroactive polymer-supported carbon material can be exploited as alternatives to conventional electromechanical actuators in applications where electromechanical actuators have some serious deficiencies. One of the numerous examples is precise microactuators. In this paper, we show for first time the dilatometric [...] Read more.
Devices using electroactive polymer-supported carbon material can be exploited as alternatives to conventional electromechanical actuators in applications where electromechanical actuators have some serious deficiencies. One of the numerous examples is precise microactuators. In this paper, we show for first time the dilatometric effect in nanocomposite material actuators containing carbide-derived carbon (CDC) and polytetrafluoroetylene polymer (PTFE). Transducers based on high surface area carbide-derived carbon electrode materials are suitable for short range displacement applications, because of the proportional actuation response to the charge inserted, and high Coulombic efficiency due to the EDL capacitance. The material is capable of developing stresses in the range of tens of N cm-2. The area of an actuator can be dozens of cm2, which means that forces above 100 N are achievable. The actuation mechanism is based on the interactions between the high-surface carbon and the ions of the electrolyte. Electrochemical evaluations of the four different actuators with linear (longitudinal) action response are described. The actuator electrodes were made from two types of nanoporous TiC-derived carbons with surface area (SA) of 1150 m2 g-1 and 1470 m2 g-1, respectively. Two kinds of electrolytes were used in actuators: 1.0 M tetraethylammonium tetrafluoroborate (TEABF4) solution in propylene carbonate and pure ionic liquid 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium trifluoromethanesulfonate (EMITf). It was found that CDC based actuators exhibit a linear movement of about 1% in the voltage range of 0.8 V to 3.0 V at DC. The actuators with EMITf electrolyte had about 70% larger movement compared to the specimen with TEABF4 electrolyte. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Molecular Biomimetics and Materials Design)

Review

Jump to: Research

Open AccessReview Review: Resin Composite Filling
Materials 2010, 3(2), 1228-1243; doi:10.3390/ma3021228
Received: 7 January 2010 / Revised: 2 February 2010 / Accepted: 9 February 2010 / Published: 19 February 2010
Cited by 6 | PDF Full-text (208 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The leading cause of oral pain and tooth loss is from caries and their treatment include restoration using amalgam, resin, porcelain and gold, endodontic therapy and extraction. Resin composite restorations have grown popular over the last half a century because it can [...] Read more.
The leading cause of oral pain and tooth loss is from caries and their treatment include restoration using amalgam, resin, porcelain and gold, endodontic therapy and extraction. Resin composite restorations have grown popular over the last half a century because it can take shades more similar to enamel. Here, we discuss the history and use of resin, comparison between amalgam and resin, clinical procedures involved and finishing and polishing techniques for resin restoration. Although resin composite has aesthetic advantages over amalgam, one of the major disadvantage include polymerization shrinkage and future research is needed on reaction kinetics and viscoelastic behaviour to minimize shrinkage stress. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Molecular Biomimetics and Materials Design)
Open AccessReview Nanostructured Photocatalysts and Their Applications in the Photocatalytic Transformation of Lignocellulosic Biomass: An Overview
Materials 2009, 2(4), 2228-2258; doi:10.3390/ma2042228
Received: 7 November 2009 / Revised: 27 November 2009 / Accepted: 2 December 2009 / Published: 7 December 2009
Cited by 56 | PDF Full-text (783 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Heterogeneous photocatalysis offer many possibilities for finding appropiate environmentally friendly solutions for many of the the problems affecting our society (i.e., energy issues). Researchers are still looking for novel routes to prepare solid photocatalysts able to transform solar into chemical [...] Read more.
Heterogeneous photocatalysis offer many possibilities for finding appropiate environmentally friendly solutions for many of the the problems affecting our society (i.e., energy issues). Researchers are still looking for novel routes to prepare solid photocatalysts able to transform solar into chemical energy more efficiently. In many developing countries, biomass is a major energy source, but currently such countries lack of the technology to sustainably obtain chemicals and/or fuels from it. The Roadmap for Biomass Technologies, authored by 26 leading experts from academia, industry, and government agencies, has predicted a gradual shift back to a carbohydrate-based economy. Biomass and biofuels appear to hold the key to satisfy the basic needs of our societies for the sustainable production of liquid fuels and high value-added chemicals without compromising the scenario of future generations. In this review, we aim to discuss various design routes for nanostructured photocatalytic solid materials in view of their applications in the selective transformation of lignocellulosic biomass to high value-added chemicals. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Molecular Biomimetics and Materials Design)
Figures

Journal Contact

MDPI AG
Materials Editorial Office
St. Alban-Anlage 66, 4052 Basel, Switzerland
materials@mdpi.com
Tel. +41 61 683 77 34
Fax: +41 61 302 89 18
Editorial Board
Contact Details Submit to Materials
Back to Top