E-Mail Alert

Add your e-mail address to receive forthcoming issues of this journal:

Journal Browser

Journal Browser

Special Issue "Brain Aging and Gut-Brain Axis"

A special issue of Nutrients (ISSN 2072-6643).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 10 September 2018

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Dr. M. Hasan Mohajeri

DSM Nutritional Products, DSM, Kaiseraugst, Switzerland; University of Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland
Website | E-Mail
Interests: brain development; aging; gut-brain coomunication; neurodegeneration; nutrition

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Increased life expectancy in the 20th century has led to a dramatic demographic shift, increasing the need of the elderly population for long-term health care and services. The last decade of life is normally marked by age-related diseases, including maladies of the brain and the gut. Progressive brain-related disorders are age dependent and, thus, their prevalence increases with advanced age. Additionally, it is generally accepted that the brain and the gut are involved in a bidirectional communication influencing each other’s functions.

This Special Issue of Nutrients, entitled "Brain Aging and Gut–Brain Axis", encourages the submission of original research articles, reviews, and meta-analyses. Potential topics may include, but are not limited to:

  • Changes to brain metabolism during aging
  • Neurogenerative disorders vs. normal brain aging
  • How does neurodevelopment affect brain aging?
  • Changes of microbiome in aging
  • Influence of altering microbiome on brain function
  • Role of nutrients in modulating brain aging, affecting microbiome composition
  • Dysbiosis in the elderly and its effect on age-related brain functions
Dr. M. Hasan Mohajeri
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Nutrients is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Aging brain, neurodegeneration
  • Microbiome metabolism
  • Brain-active nutrients
  • Mechanisms of brain aging
  • Dysbiosis in aging gut

Published Papers (1 paper)

View options order results:
result details:
Displaying articles 1-1
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Open AccessArticle Towards an Integrative Understanding of tRNA Aminoacylation–Diet–Host–Gut Microbiome Interactions in Neurodegeneration
Nutrients 2018, 10(4), 410; doi:10.3390/nu10040410
Received: 14 February 2018 / Revised: 19 March 2018 / Accepted: 22 March 2018 / Published: 26 March 2018
PDF Full-text (50385 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
Transgenic mice used for Alzheimer’s disease (AD) preclinical experiments do not recapitulate the human disease. In our models, the dietary tryptophan metabolite tryptamine produced by human gut microbiome induces tryptophanyl-tRNA synthetase (TrpRS) deficiency with consequent neurodegeneration in cells and mice. Dietary supplements, antibiotics
[...] Read more.
Transgenic mice used for Alzheimer’s disease (AD) preclinical experiments do not recapitulate the human disease. In our models, the dietary tryptophan metabolite tryptamine produced by human gut microbiome induces tryptophanyl-tRNA synthetase (TrpRS) deficiency with consequent neurodegeneration in cells and mice. Dietary supplements, antibiotics and certain drugs increase tryptamine content in vivo. TrpRS catalyzes tryptophan attachment to tRNAtrp at initial step of protein biosynthesis. Tryptamine that easily crosses the blood–brain barrier induces vasculopathies, neurodegeneration and cell death via TrpRS competitive inhibition. TrpRS inhibitor tryptophanol produced by gut microbiome also induces neurodegeneration. TrpRS inhibition by tryptamine and its metabolites preventing tryptophan incorporation into proteins lead to protein biosynthesis impairment. Tryptophan, a least amino acid in food and proteins that cannot be synthesized by humans competes with frequent amino acids for the transport from blood to brain. Tryptophan is a vulnerable amino acid, which can be easily lost to protein biosynthesis. Some proteins marking neurodegenerative pathology, such as tau lack tryptophan. TrpRS exists in cytoplasmic (WARS) and mitochondrial (WARS2) forms. Pathogenic gene variants of both forms cause TrpRS deficiency with consequent intellectual and motor disabilities in humans. The diminished tryptophan-dependent protein biosynthesis in AD patients is a proof of our model-based disease concept. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Brain Aging and Gut-Brain Axis)
Figures

Back to Top