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Special Issue "Nutrition and Aging"

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A special issue of Nutrients (ISSN 2072-6643).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 December 2010)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Dr. Valentina M. Remig

3408 Womack Way, Manhattan, KS 66503-2569, USA
E-Mail
Interests: clinical nutrition; consumer food safety; nutrition education of health professionals and consumers; healthy aging research; Parkinson’s disease; cardiovascular health and trans fats

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle Food Intake of Kansans Over 80 Years of Age Attending Congregate Meal Sites
Nutrients 2010, 2(12), 1297-1307; doi:10.3390/nu2121297
Received: 2 November 2010 / Revised: 9 December 2010 / Accepted: 17 December 2010 / Published: 20 December 2010
Cited by 3 | PDF Full-text (173 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
As the population of the United States continues to age, it has become increasingly more important to recognize the food intake and eating habits of older adults. The objective of this study was to describe the food group intake, factors predicting food group
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As the population of the United States continues to age, it has become increasingly more important to recognize the food intake and eating habits of older adults. The objective of this study was to describe the food group intake, factors predicting food group intake, and the food choices of community-dwelling Kansans, 80 years of age and older who participate in congregate meal programs. Participants completed a short questionnaire querying demographic information, current health status, and dietary supplement use. Participants (n = 113) were then followed up via telephone to complete two 24-hour diet recalls. Data were analyzed to determine adequacy of food group intake and mean intake. Regression analyses were used to determine factors predicting intake and frequency analysis established food typically consumed. Female participants were significantly more likely to consume more fruit servings than males. Intake was low for all five of the food groups, especially dairy. Chronic health conditions and dietary supplement use were consistently predictive factors of the amount of each food group consumed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nutrition and Aging)
Open AccessArticle Nutrition-Related Practices and Attitudes of Kansas Skipped-Generation(s) Caregivers and Their Grandchildren
Nutrients 2010, 2(12), 1188-1211; doi:10.3390/nu2121188
Received: 15 October 2010 / Revised: 17 November 2010 / Accepted: 22 November 2010 / Published: 30 November 2010
Cited by 5 | PDF Full-text (291 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Despite growing numbers, the nutrition practices and attitudes of skipped‑generation(s) kinship caregivers regarding feeding the dependent children in their care have not been examined. In this qualitative study, transcriptions of semi-structured interviews with 19 female and four male skipped-generation(s) Kansas caregivers (ages 47
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Despite growing numbers, the nutrition practices and attitudes of skipped‑generation(s) kinship caregivers regarding feeding the dependent children in their care have not been examined. In this qualitative study, transcriptions of semi-structured interviews with 19 female and four male skipped-generation(s) Kansas caregivers (ages 47 to 80, 92% non-Hispanic whites, 83% female, 78% grandparents and 22% great-aunt or great‑grandparent caregivers; caring for a range of one to four children, ages three to 18, for an average of nine years) were content analyzed for how their nutrition-related practices and attitudes had changed since parenting the first time. Sub-themes regarding practices included: being more nutrition and food safety conscious now, and shifting their child feeding style. The children seemed to be adversely affected by an on-the-go lifestyle and the use of more electronics. Caregivers described their sources for child feeding advice as being based mostly on information from their mothers, physicians, and their past parenting experiences. Sub-themes for attitudes included opinions that nutrition and safe food handling are important and that nutritious food is expensive. They preferred printed or video nutrition education materials and wanted to receive information through organizations they trusted. This population could benefit from education on: infant, child, adolescent, and sports nutrition; feeding “picky eaters”; healthful recipes, “fast foods” and packaged foods; quick, inexpensive meals and snacks low in fat, sugar, and salt; limiting sedentary time; family meals; using food thermometers; and intergenerational gardening and cooking. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nutrition and Aging)

Review

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Open AccessReview Aging and Longevity: Why Knowing the Difference Is Important to Nutrition Research
Nutrients 2011, 3(3), 274-282; doi:10.3390/nu3030274
Received: 16 January 2011 / Revised: 7 February 2011 / Accepted: 25 February 2011 / Published: 28 February 2011
Cited by 5 | PDF Full-text (238 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Life expectancies after the age of 70 and the number of individuals living with age-related chronic conditions that affect daily activities continue to increase. Age-specific nutritional recommendations may help to decrease the incidence or severity of age-related debilitating chronic disorders. However, research in
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Life expectancies after the age of 70 and the number of individuals living with age-related chronic conditions that affect daily activities continue to increase. Age-specific nutritional recommendations may help to decrease the incidence or severity of age-related debilitating chronic disorders. However, research in this area has seen limited success in identifying nutrition-related mechanisms that underlie the functional loss and chronic conditions that occur as a function of time. We believe that the limited success in establishing age-specific nutrition recommendations for the older population reflects, at least in part, research designs that fail to consider the evolutionary and biological bases of aging and longevity. Longevity has evolved as a by-product of genes selected for their contribution in helping the organism survive to the age of reproduction. As such, the principle of genetic determinism provides an appropriate underlying theory for research designs evaluating nutritional factors involved with life span. Aging is not a product of evolution and reflects stochastic and/or random events that most likely begin during the early, reproductively-active years. The genetic determinism model by which young (normal, control) are compared to old (abnormal, experimental) groups will not be effective in identifying underlying mechanisms and nutritional factors that impact aging. The purpose of this commentary is to briefly discuss the difference between aging and longevity and why knowing the difference is important to nutrition research and to establishing the most precise nutritional recommendations possible for the older population. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nutrition and Aging)
Open AccessReview Dietary Advanced Glycation End Products and Aging
Nutrients 2010, 2(12), 1247-1265; doi:10.3390/nu2121247
Received: 29 October 2010 / Revised: 30 November 2010 / Accepted: 10 December 2010 / Published: 13 December 2010
Cited by 80 | PDF Full-text (353 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) are a heterogeneous, complex group of compounds that are formed when reducing sugar reacts in a non-enzymatic way with amino acids in proteins and other macromolecules. This occurs both exogenously (in food) and endogenously (in humans) with greater
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Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) are a heterogeneous, complex group of compounds that are formed when reducing sugar reacts in a non-enzymatic way with amino acids in proteins and other macromolecules. This occurs both exogenously (in food) and endogenously (in humans) with greater concentrations found in older adults. While higher AGEs occur in both healthy older adults and those with chronic diseases, research is progressing to both quantify AGEs in food and in people, and to identify mechanisms that would explain why some human tissues are damaged, and others are not. In the last twenty years, there has been increased evidence that AGEs could be implicated in the development of chronic degenerative diseases of aging, such as cardiovascular disease, Alzheimer’s disease and with complications of diabetes mellitus. Results of several studies in animal models and humans show that the restriction of dietary AGEs has positive effects on wound healing, insulin resistance and cardiovascular diseases. Recently, the effect of restriction in AGEs intake has been reported to increase the lifespan in animal models. This paper will summarize the work that has been published for both food AGEs and in vivo AGEs and their relation with aging, as well as provide suggestions for future research. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nutrition and Aging)
Open AccessReview Bone Health Nutrition Issues in Aging
Nutrients 2010, 2(11), 1086-1105; doi:10.3390/nu2111086
Received: 19 September 2010 / Revised: 29 October 2010 / Accepted: 2 November 2010 / Published: 8 November 2010
Cited by 6 | PDF Full-text (178 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Bone health is an important issue in aging. Calcium and vitamin D currently have the most focus in published research on nutrition and bone health in aging, although evidence from published research is not conclusive. A systematic review was conducted to determine the
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Bone health is an important issue in aging. Calcium and vitamin D currently have the most focus in published research on nutrition and bone health in aging, although evidence from published research is not conclusive. A systematic review was conducted to determine the impact of dietary and supplemental interventions focused on calcium and vitamin D over the past 10 years. Using key words to search, and search limits (aging population, English), 62 papers were found related to diet, nutrition, and bone; and 157 were found related to calcium and bone. Our review found a positive effect on bone health for supplements; food-based interventions; and educational strategies. Although there may be a publishing bias related to non-significant findings not being published, our results suggest the effectiveness of food based and educational interventions with less economic impact to the individual, as well as less risk of physiological side effects occurring. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nutrition and Aging)

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