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Special Issue "Dietary Salt and Human Health"

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A special issue of Nutrients (ISSN 2072-6643).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 April 2011)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Caryl Nowson (Website)

Centre for Physical Activity and Nutrition Research, School of Exercise and Nutrition Sciences, Deakin University Geelong Waurn Ponds Campus, Deakin University, Locked Bag 20000, Geelong Victoria 3220, Australia
Fax: +61 3 9244 6017
Interests: dietary mineral and electrolytes; nutrition related to cardiovascular disease and osteoporosis; elderly nutrition

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Review

Open AccessReview Canadian Initiatives to Prevent Hypertension by Reducing Dietary Sodium
Nutrients 2011, 3(8), 756-764; doi:10.3390/nu3080756
Received: 1 July 2011 / Revised: 19 July 2011 / Accepted: 4 August 2011 / Published: 16 August 2011
Cited by 7 | PDF Full-text (162 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Hypertension is the leading risk for premature death in the world. High dietary sodium is an important contributor to increased blood pressure and is strongly associated with other important diseases (e.g., gastric cancer, calcium containing kidney stones, osteoporosis, asthma and obesity). The [...] Read more.
Hypertension is the leading risk for premature death in the world. High dietary sodium is an important contributor to increased blood pressure and is strongly associated with other important diseases (e.g., gastric cancer, calcium containing kidney stones, osteoporosis, asthma and obesity). The average dietary sodium intake in Canada is approximately 3400 mg/day. It is estimated that 30% of hypertension, more than 10% of cardiovascular events and 1.4 billion dollars/year in health care expenses are caused by this high level of intake in Canada. Since 2006, Canada has had a focused and evolving effort to reduce dietary sodium based on actions from Non Governmental Organizations (NGO), and Federal and Provincial/Territorial Government actions. NGOs initiated Canadian sodium reduction programs by developing a policy statement outlining the health issue and calling for governmental, NGO and industry action, developing and disseminating an extensive health care professional education program including resources for patient education, developing a public awareness campaign through extensive media releases and publications in the lay press. The Federal Government responded by striking a Intersectoral Sodium Work Group to develop recommendations on how to implement Canada’s dietary reference intake values for dietary sodium and by developing timelines and targets for foods to be reduced in sodium, assessing key research gaps with funding for targeted dietary sodium based research, developing plans for public education and for conducting evaluation of the program to reduce dietary sodium. While food regulation is a Federal Government responsibility Provincial and Territorial governments indicated reducing dietary sodium needed to be a priority. Federal and Provincial Ministers of Health have endorsed a target to reduce the average consumption of sodium to 2300 mg/day by 2016 and the Deputy Ministers of Health have tasked a joint committee to review the recommendations of the Sodium Work Group and report back to them. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Dietary Salt and Human Health)
Open AccessReview Reducing Sodium in Foods: The Effect on Flavor
Nutrients 2011, 3(6), 694-711; doi:10.3390/nu3060694
Received: 5 May 2011 / Revised: 31 May 2011 / Accepted: 10 June 2011 / Published: 20 June 2011
Cited by 50 | PDF Full-text (399 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Sodium is an essential micronutrient and, via salt taste, appetitive. High consumption of sodium is, however, related to negative health effects such as hypertension, cardiovascular diseases and stroke. In industrialized countries, about 75% of sodium in the diet comes from manufactured foods [...] Read more.
Sodium is an essential micronutrient and, via salt taste, appetitive. High consumption of sodium is, however, related to negative health effects such as hypertension, cardiovascular diseases and stroke. In industrialized countries, about 75% of sodium in the diet comes from manufactured foods and foods eaten away from home. Reducing sodium in processed foods will be, however, challenging due to sodium’s specific functionality in terms of flavor and associated palatability of foods (i.e., increase of saltiness, reduction of bitterness, enhancement of sweetness and other congruent flavors). The current review discusses the sensory role of sodium in food, determinants of salt taste perception and a variety of strategies, such as sodium replacers (i.e., potassium salts) and gradual reduction of sodium, to decrease sodium in processed foods while maintaining palatability. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Dietary Salt and Human Health)

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