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Special Issue "Food and Function 2009"

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A special issue of Nutrients (ISSN 2072-6643).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 December 2009)

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Dr. Péter Kürti (Website)

Executive Director, Pamida International, Komenskeho 2656, 024 01 Kzsucke Nove Mesto, Slovak Republic
Phone: +45 65 745 514
Fax: +421 41 400 0123
Guest Editor
Dr. Alojz Bomba (Website)

Institute of Experimental Medicine, Tr. SNP 1, 040 66 Košice, Slovak Republic
Fax: +421 55 6420 253

Special Issue Information

Related Conferences:

International Probiotic Conference 2010 - IPC 2010, The Scientific Conference on Probiotics and Prebiotics
Date: 15-17th June 2010
Place: Kosice, Slovakia
Webpage: www.probiotic-conference.net
Contact: Maria Kasmanova, Organizing Secretariat - International Probiotic Conference 2010
Phone: +421 918 707 371
Fax: +421 41 4000 123
E-Mail: info@probiotic-conference.net

The conference programme will focus on current advances in the science and research of probiotics, prebiotics and their present and future role in maintaining health and preventing diseases. IPC 2010 aims to highlight evidence-based benefits as proven in clinical trials and scientific experiments.
Further to the health effect of probiotics and prebiotics new developments in their selection, identification, production, application and delivery will be discussed. Topical subjects as safety, regulatory issues and claim substantiation will be also addressed by internationally renowned experts from industry and academia. It is the goal of IPC 2010 to further explore the potential of already used and novel probiotics by disseminating latest results and new ways of probiotic research. In addition novel strains, controversial but scientifically solid ideas, approaches, visions will be presented, and worldwide co-operation between scientists and institutions acilitated.
Keywords: probiotics; prebiotics; health claims; gastroenterology; intestinal microbiota

Food and Function 2009 - International Scientific Conference on Nutraceuticals and Functional Foods
Date: 9-11th June 2009
Place: Zilina, Slovakia - Holiday Inn
Webpage: http://www.foodandfunction.com/

The conference program will focus on the current advances in the research of nutraceuticals, functional foods and their present and future role in maintaining health and preventing diseases. The conference is a scientific forum for all stakeholders of nutraceuticals, functional foods and enable the interactive exchange of related state-of-the-art knowledge.

The pre- and post-conference satellite symposia will be dedicated to the role of fermented foods in maintaining health and the role of probiotics in maintaining gastro-intestinal health.

Keywords

  • functional food
  • nutraceuticals
  • health
  • medical nutrition
  • gastroenterology

Published Papers (6 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessCommunication Comparative Effects of R- and S-equol and Implication of Transactivation Functions (AF-1 and AF-2) in Estrogen Receptor-Induced Transcriptional Activity
Nutrients 2010, 2(3), 340-354; doi:10.3390/nu2030340
Received: 4 January 2010 / Revised: 20 February 2010 / Accepted: 25 February 2010 / Published: 15 March 2010
Cited by 6 | PDF Full-text (396 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Equol, one of the main metabolites of daidzein, is a chiral compound with pleiotropic effects on cellular signaling. This property may induce activation/inhibition of the estrogen receptors (ER) a or b, and therefore, explain the beneficial/deleterious effects of equol on estrogen-dependent diseases. [...] Read more.
Equol, one of the main metabolites of daidzein, is a chiral compound with pleiotropic effects on cellular signaling. This property may induce activation/inhibition of the estrogen receptors (ER) a or b, and therefore, explain the beneficial/deleterious effects of equol on estrogen-dependent diseases. With its asymmetric centre at position C-3, equol can exist in two enantiomeric forms (R- and S-equol). To elucidate the yet unclear mechanisms of ER activation/inhibition by equol, we performed a comprehensive analysis of ERa and ERb transactivation by racemic equol, as well as by enantiomerically pure forms. Racemic equol was prepared by catalytic hydrogenation from daidzein and separated into enantiomers by chiral HPLC. The configuration assignment was performed by optical rotatory power measurements. The ER-induced transactivation by R- and S-equol (0.1–10 µM) and 17b-estradiol (E2, 10 nM) was studied using transient transfections of ERa and ERb in CHO, HepG2 and HeLa cell lines. R- and S-equol induce ER transactivation in an opposite fashion according to the cellular context. R-equol and S-equol are more potent in inducing ERa in an AF-2 and AF-1 permissive cell line, respectively. Involvement of ERa transactivation functions (AF-1 and AF-2) in these effects has been examined. Both AF-1 and AF-2 are involved in racemic equol, R-equol and S-equol induced ERa transcriptional activity. These results could be of interest to find a specific ligand modulating ER transactivation and could contribute to explaining the diversity of equol actions in vivo. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Food and Function 2009)
Open AccessArticle Pilot-scale Production and Viability Analysis of Freeze-Dried Probiotic Bacteria Using Different Protective Agents
Nutrients 2010, 2(3), 330-339; doi:10.3390/nu2030330
Received: 23 December 2009 / Revised: 28 January 2010 / Accepted: 20 February 2010 / Published: 11 March 2010
Cited by 19 | PDF Full-text (973 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The functional food industry requires an improvement of probiotic strain stability during storage, especially when they are stored at room temperature. In this study, the viability of freeze-dried Lactobacillus rhamnosus IMC 501® and Lactobacillus paracasei IMC 502® using different protective [...] Read more.
The functional food industry requires an improvement of probiotic strain stability during storage, especially when they are stored at room temperature. In this study, the viability of freeze-dried Lactobacillus rhamnosus IMC 501® and Lactobacillus paracasei IMC 502® using different protective agents (i.e., glycerine, mannitol, sorbitol, inulin, dextrin, Crystalean®) was determined and compared with semi skimmed milk (SSM) control. No significant differences were observed between the tested protectants and the control (SSM) during storage at refrigerated conditions. During storage at room temperature, only glycerine was found to stabilize viability better than other tested substances. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Food and Function 2009)
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Review

Jump to: Research

Open AccessReview Micronutrients, N-Acetyl Cysteine, Probiotics and Prebiotics, a Review of Effectiveness in Reducing HIV Progression
Nutrients 2010, 2(6), 626-651; doi:10.3390/nu2060626
Received: 29 April 2010 / Revised: 18 May 2010 / Accepted: 25 May 2010 / Published: 2 June 2010
Cited by 12 | PDF Full-text (274 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Low serum concentrations of micronutrients, intestinal abnormalities, and an inflammatory state have been associated with HIV progression. These may be ameliorated by micronutrients, N-acetyl cysteine, probiotics, and prebiotics. This review aims to integrate the evidence from clinical trials of these interventions [...] Read more.
Low serum concentrations of micronutrients, intestinal abnormalities, and an inflammatory state have been associated with HIV progression. These may be ameliorated by micronutrients, N-acetyl cysteine, probiotics, and prebiotics. This review aims to integrate the evidence from clinical trials of these interventions on the progression of HIV. Vitamin B, C, E, and folic acid have been shown to delay the progression of HIV. Supplementation with selenium, N-acetyl cysteine, probiotics, and prebiotics has considerable potential, but the evidence needs to be further substantiated. Vitamin A, iron, and zinc have been associated with adverse effects and caution is warranted for their use. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Food and Function 2009)
Open AccessReview The Role of Functional Foods, Nutraceuticals, and Food Supplements in Intestinal Health
Nutrients 2010, 2(6), 611-625; doi:10.3390/nu2060611
Received: 6 May 2010 / Revised: 21 May 2010 / Accepted: 30 May 2010 / Published: 1 June 2010
Cited by 31 | PDF Full-text (277 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
New eating habits, actual trends in production and consumption have a health, environmental and social impact. The European Union is fighting diseases characteristic of a modern age, such as obesity, osteoporosis, cancer, diabetes, allergies and dental problems. Developed countries are also faced [...] Read more.
New eating habits, actual trends in production and consumption have a health, environmental and social impact. The European Union is fighting diseases characteristic of a modern age, such as obesity, osteoporosis, cancer, diabetes, allergies and dental problems. Developed countries are also faced with problems relating to aging populations, high energy foods, and unbalanced diets. The potential of nutraceuticals/functional foods/food supplements in mitigating health problems, especially in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract, is discussed. Certain members of gut microflora (e.g., probiotic/protective strains) play a role in the host health due to its involvement in nutritional, immunologic and physiological functions. The potential mechanisms by which nutraceuticals/functional foods/food supplements may alter a host’s health are also highlighted in this paper. The establishment of novel functional cell models of the GI and analytical tools that allow tests in controlled experiments are highly desired for gut research. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Food and Function 2009)
Open AccessReview Beneficial Effects of Probiotic and Food Borne Yeasts on Human Health
Nutrients 2010, 2(4), 449-473; doi:10.3390/nu2040449
Received: 28 January 2010 / Revised: 1 March 2010 / Accepted: 24 March 2010 / Published: 1 April 2010
Cited by 30 | PDF Full-text (267 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Besides being important in the fermentation of foods and beverages, yeasts have shown numerous beneficial effects on human health. Among these, probiotic effects are the most well known health effects including prevention and treatment of intestinal diseases and immunomodulatory effects. Other beneficial [...] Read more.
Besides being important in the fermentation of foods and beverages, yeasts have shown numerous beneficial effects on human health. Among these, probiotic effects are the most well known health effects including prevention and treatment of intestinal diseases and immunomodulatory effects. Other beneficial functions of yeasts are improvement of bioavailability of minerals through the hydrolysis of phytate, folate biofortification and detoxification of mycotoxins due to surface binding to the yeast cell wall. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Food and Function 2009)
Open AccessReview Streptococcus mutans, Caries and Simulation Models
Nutrients 2010, 2(3), 290-298; doi:10.3390/nu2030290
Received: 24 December 2009 / Accepted: 23 February 2010 / Published: 2 March 2010
Cited by 24 | PDF Full-text (386 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Dental caries and dental plaque are among the most common diseases worldwide, and are caused by a mixture of microorganisms and food debris. Specific types of acid-producing bacteria, especially Streptococcus mutans, colonize the dental surface and cause damage to the hard tooth [...] Read more.
Dental caries and dental plaque are among the most common diseases worldwide, and are caused by a mixture of microorganisms and food debris. Specific types of acid-producing bacteria, especially Streptococcus mutans, colonize the dental surface and cause damage to the hard tooth structure in the presence of fermentable carbohydrates e.g., sucrose and fructose. This paper reviews the link between S. mutans and caries, as well as different simulation models that are available for studying caries. These models offer a valuable approach to study cariogenicity of different substrates as well as colonization of S. mutans. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Food and Function 2009)

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