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Special Issue "Nutriceuticals"

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A special issue of Nutrients (ISSN 2072-6643).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 November 2010)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Mark S. Kuhlenschmidt (Website)

Professor of Microbiology and Immunology, Department of Pathobiology, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Illinois, 2001 S. Lincoln Ave., Urbana, IL 61802, USA
Phone: 217-333-9039
Fax: +1 217 244 7421
Interests: microbial adhesion; host-pathogen interactions; infectious disease; apicomplexan parasites; nutriceuticals; receptor therapy; complex carbohydrate biochemistry; neoglycoconjugates; lipids (LPUFA)

Keywords

  • nutriceutical prebiotic functional foods dietary
  • mimetic antioxidant phytochemical soy isoflavone
  • medical foods
  • receptor therapy

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle Inhibition of Rotavirus Infectivity by a Neoglycolipid Receptor Mimetic
Nutrients 2011, 3(2), 228-244; doi:10.3390/nu3020228
Received: 10 January 2011 / Revised: 24 January 2011 / Accepted: 16 February 2011 / Published: 17 February 2011
Cited by 3 | PDF Full-text (916 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Group A rotaviruses are a major cause of diarrhea in the young of many mammalian species. In rotavirus infected piglets mortality can be as high as 60%. Previous research in this laboratory has identified a porcine intestinal GM3 ganglioside receptor that [...] Read more.
Group A rotaviruses are a major cause of diarrhea in the young of many mammalian species. In rotavirus infected piglets mortality can be as high as 60%. Previous research in this laboratory has identified a porcine intestinal GM3 ganglioside receptor that is required for sialic acid-dependent rotavirus recognition of host cells. In addition, we previously demonstrated exogenously added GM3 can competitively inhibit porcine rotavirus binding and infectivity of host cells in vitro. Sialyllactose, the carbohydrate moiety of GM3, is approximately 3 orders of magnitude less effective than GM3 at inhibiting rotavirus binding to cells. Furthermore, production of therapeutic quantities of GM3 ganglioside for use as an oral carbomimetic in swine is cost prohibitive. In an effort to circumvent these problems, a sialyllactose-containing neoglycolipid was synthesized and evaluated for its ability to inhibit rotavirus binding and infectivity of host cells. Sialyllactose was coupled to dipalmitoylphosphatidylethanolamine (PE) by reductive amination and the product (SLPE) purified by HPLC. Characterization of the product showed a single primulin (lipid) and resorcinol (sialic acid) positive band by thin layer chromatography and quantification of phosphate and sialic acid yielded a 1:1 molar ratio. Mass spectroscopy confirmed a molecular weight coinciding with SLPE. Concentration-dependent binding of rotavirus to SLPE was demonstrated using a thin-layer overlay assay. Using concentrations comparable to GM3, SLPE was also shown to inhibit rotavirus binding to host cells by 80%. Furthermore, SLPE was shown to decrease rotavirus infection of host cells by over 90%. Finally, preliminary results of in vivo animal challenge studies using newborn piglets in their natural environment, demonstrated SLPE afforded complete protection from rotavirus disease. The efficacy of SLPE in inhibiting rotavirus binding and infection in vitro and in vivo, coupled with its relatively low-cost, large-scale production capabilities make SLPE a promising candidate for further exploration as a possible prophylactic or therapeutic nutriceutical for combating rotavirus disease in animals. Most importantly, the results presented here provide proof of concept that the nutriceutical approach of providing natural or synthetic dietary receptor mimetics for protection against gastrointestinal virus infectious disease in all species is plausible. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nutriceuticals)
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Review

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Open AccessReview Bioactive Peptides from Muscle Sources: Meat and Fish
Nutrients 2011, 3(9), 765-791; doi:10.3390/nu3090765
Received: 7 July 2011 / Revised: 4 August 2011 / Accepted: 9 August 2011 / Published: 31 August 2011
Cited by 95 | PDF Full-text (327 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Bioactive peptides have been identified in a range of foods, including plant, milk and muscle, e.g., beef, chicken, pork and fish muscle proteins. Bioactive peptides from food proteins offer major potential for incorporation into functional foods and nutraceuticals. The aim of this [...] Read more.
Bioactive peptides have been identified in a range of foods, including plant, milk and muscle, e.g., beef, chicken, pork and fish muscle proteins. Bioactive peptides from food proteins offer major potential for incorporation into functional foods and nutraceuticals. The aim of this paper is to present an outline of the bioactive peptides identified in the muscle protein of meat to date, with a focus on muscle protein from domestic animals and fish. The majority of research on bioactives from meat sources has focused on angiotensin-1-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory and antioxidant peptides. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nutriceuticals)
Open AccessReview Lactobacillus Adhesion to Mucus
Nutrients 2011, 3(5), 613-636; doi:10.3390/nu3050613
Received: 10 April 2011 / Revised: 5 May 2011 / Accepted: 11 May 2011 / Published: 20 May 2011
Cited by 45 | PDF Full-text (536 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Mucus provides protective functions in the gastrointestinal tract and plays an important role in the adhesion of microorganisms to host surfaces. Mucin glycoproteins polymerize, forming a framework to which certain microbial populations can adhere, including probiotic Lactobacillus species. Numerous mechanisms for adhesion [...] Read more.
Mucus provides protective functions in the gastrointestinal tract and plays an important role in the adhesion of microorganisms to host surfaces. Mucin glycoproteins polymerize, forming a framework to which certain microbial populations can adhere, including probiotic Lactobacillus species. Numerous mechanisms for adhesion to mucus have been discovered in lactobacilli, including partially characterized mucus binding proteins. These mechanisms vary in importance with the in vitro models studied, which could significantly affect the perceived probiotic potential of the organisms. Understanding the nature of mucus-microbe interactions could be the key to elucidating the mechanisms of probiotic adhesion within the host. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nutriceuticals)
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