E-Mail Alert

Add your e-mail address to receive forthcoming issues of this journal:

Journal Browser

Journal Browser

Topical Collection "Featured Mini Reviews in Polymer Science"

Editor

Collection Editor
Prof. Dr. Alexander Böker

Fraunhofer-Institut für Angewandte Polymerforschung, Lehrstuhl für Polymermaterialien und Polymertechnologie, Universität Potsdam, Geiselbergstraße 69, 14476 Potsdam-Golm, Germany
Website | E-Mail
Phone: +49 (0) 331/ 568 1112
Fax: +49 (0) 331/ 568 3000
Interests: guided block copolymer assembly; orientation and phase behavior of block copolymers in electric fields; block copolymer/nanoparticle composites; self-assembly of nanoparticles at interfaces; Pickering-Emulsions; template directed nanoparticle assembly; pattern transfer

Topical Collection Information

Dear Colleagues,

In the past, Polymers followed a strategy aiming at highlighting important topics of polymer science with dedicated collections and reviews. As it turned out that many of these selected topics would fill more than just one collection being state of the art and worthy of more than one review, we decided to set up a new series of Topical Collections to keep stimulating discussion of hot topics throughout the academic year. Within this new series, we will publish contributed and invited mini-reviews with a clear focus on a certain hot topic. We hope to provide our readers with new and stimulating insights relating to recent developments in the field and look forward to receiving your contributions.

Prof. Dr. Alexander Böker
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

 

Manuscripts for the topical collection can be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on this website. The topical collection considers regular research articles, short communications and review articles. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page.

Published Papers (6 papers)

2017

Jump to: 2016, 2015

Open AccessReview Particle Distribution of Solid Flame Retardants in Infusion Moulded Composites
Polymers 2017, 9(7), 250; doi:10.3390/polym9070250
Received: 29 May 2017 / Revised: 23 June 2017 / Accepted: 23 June 2017 / Published: 28 June 2017
PDF Full-text (3306 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Resin transfer moulding (RTM) is commonly used for the production of high-performance fibre-reinforced polymer composites. In numerous application areas, the addition of fillers is necessary to enhance some properties of the polymer matrix or provide it with additional properties, such as flame retardancy.
[...] Read more.
Resin transfer moulding (RTM) is commonly used for the production of high-performance fibre-reinforced polymer composites. In numerous application areas, the addition of fillers is necessary to enhance some properties of the polymer matrix or provide it with additional properties, such as flame retardancy. As many of the applied additives are solid phase, the reinforcement layers may filter the solid phase additive particles during RTM, resulting in a non-uniform distribution and uneven performance. Consequently, the proper distribution of the solid phase additives in composites is of key importance. This review primarily aims at facilitating the production of flame retarded structural composites by RTM in cases where the required fire performance can only be achieved with solid additives. First, the parameters influencing the particle distribution, along with the models describing it, are reviewed. Then, analytical methods for determining the particle distribution in composites manufactured by RTM are presented. Finally, the possible solutions to improve the particle distribution of solid phase additives are outlined. Full article
Figures

2016

Jump to: 2017, 2015

Open AccessReview Olefin–Styrene Copolymers
Polymers 2016, 8(11), 405; doi:10.3390/polym8110405
Received: 24 October 2016 / Revised: 11 November 2016 / Accepted: 14 November 2016 / Published: 19 November 2016
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (5203 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
In this review are reported some of the most relevant achievements in the chemistry of the ethylene–styrene copolymerization and in the characterization of the copolymer materials. Focus is put on the relationship between the structure of the catalyst and that of the obtained
[...] Read more.
In this review are reported some of the most relevant achievements in the chemistry of the ethylene–styrene copolymerization and in the characterization of the copolymer materials. Focus is put on the relationship between the structure of the catalyst and that of the obtained copolymer. On the other hand, the wide variety of copolymer architecture is related to the properties of the material and to the potential utility. Full article
Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessReview Cracks in Polymer Spherulites: Phenomenological Mechanisms in Correlation with Ring Bands
Polymers 2016, 8(9), 329; doi:10.3390/polym8090329
Received: 18 July 2016 / Revised: 24 August 2016 / Accepted: 30 August 2016 / Published: 2 September 2016
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (24685 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
This article reviews possible mechanisms of various crack forms and their likely correlations with interior crystal lamellae and discontinuous interfaces in spherulites. Complex yet periodically repetitive patterns of cracks in spherulites are beyond attributions via differences in thermal expansion coefficients, which would cause
[...] Read more.
This article reviews possible mechanisms of various crack forms and their likely correlations with interior crystal lamellae and discontinuous interfaces in spherulites. Complex yet periodically repetitive patterns of cracks in spherulites are beyond attributions via differences in thermal expansion coefficients, which would cause random and irregular cracks in the contract direction only. Cracks in brittle polymers such as poly(l-lactic acid) (PLLA), or poly(4-hydroxyl butyrate) (PHB), or more ductile polymers such as poly(trimethylene terephthalate) (PTT) are examined and illustrated, although for focus and demonstration, more discussions are spent on PLLA. The cracks can take many shapes that bear extremely striking similarity to the ring-band or lamellar patterns in the same spherulites. Crack patterns may differ significantly between the ring-banded and ringless spherulites, suggesting that the cracks may be partially shaped and governed by interfaces of lamellae and how the lamellar crystals assemble themselves in spherulites. Similarly, with some exceptions, most of the cracks patterns in PHB or PTT are also highly guided by the lamellar assembly in either ring-banded spherulites or ringless spherulites. Some exceptions of cracks in spherulites deviating from the apparent crystal birefringence patterns do exist; nevertheless, discontinuous interfaces in the initial lamellae neat the nuclei center might be hidden by top crystal over-layers of the spherulites, which might govern crack propagation. Full article
Figures

Open AccessReview Polybenzoxazine/Polyhedral Oligomeric Silsesquioxane (POSS) Nanocomposites
Polymers 2016, 8(6), 225; doi:10.3390/polym8060225
Received: 9 April 2016 / Revised: 26 May 2016 / Accepted: 2 June 2016 / Published: 7 June 2016
Cited by 7 | PDF Full-text (13335 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The organic/inorganic hybrid materials from polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (POSS, inorganic nanoparticles) and polybenzoxazine (PBZ) have received much interesting recently due to their excellent thermal and mechanical properties, flame retardance, low dielectric constant, well-defined inorganic framework at nanosized scale level, and higher performance relative
[...] Read more.
The organic/inorganic hybrid materials from polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (POSS, inorganic nanoparticles) and polybenzoxazine (PBZ) have received much interesting recently due to their excellent thermal and mechanical properties, flame retardance, low dielectric constant, well-defined inorganic framework at nanosized scale level, and higher performance relative to those of non-hybrid PBZs. This review describes the synthesis, dielectric constants, and thermal, rheological, and mechanical properties of covalently bonded mono- and multifunctionalized benzoxazine POSS hybrids, other functionalized benzoxazine POSS derivatives, and non-covalently (hydrogen) bonded benzoxazine POSS composites. Full article
Figures

Open AccessFeature PaperReview Design and Utility of Metal/Metal Oxide Nanoparticles Mediated by Thioether End-Functionalized Polymeric Ligands
Polymers 2016, 8(4), 156; doi:10.3390/polym8040156
Received: 22 December 2015 / Revised: 30 March 2016 / Accepted: 31 March 2016 / Published: 21 April 2016
Cited by 3 | PDF Full-text (7028 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The past few decades have witnessed significant advances in the development of functionalized metal/metal oxide nanoparticles including those of inorganic noble metals and magnetic materials stabilized by various polymeric ligands. Recent applications of such functionalized nanoparticles, including those in bio-imaging, sensing, catalysis, drug
[...] Read more.
The past few decades have witnessed significant advances in the development of functionalized metal/metal oxide nanoparticles including those of inorganic noble metals and magnetic materials stabilized by various polymeric ligands. Recent applications of such functionalized nanoparticles, including those in bio-imaging, sensing, catalysis, drug delivery, and other biomedical applications have triggered the need for their facile and reproducible preparation with a better control over their size, shape, and surface chemistry. In this perspective, the multidentate polymer ligands containing functional groups like thiol, thioether, and ester are important surface ligands for designing and synthesizing stable nanoparticles (NPs) of metals or their oxides with reproducibility and high yield. These ligands have offered an unprecedented control over the particle size of both nanoparticles and nanoclusters with enhanced colloidal stability, having tunable solubility in aqueous and organic media, and tunable optical, magnetic, and fluorescent properties. This review summarizes the synthetic methodologies and stability of nanoparticles and fluorescent nanoclusters of metals (Au, Ag, Cu, Pt, and other transition metal oxides) prepared by using thioether based ligands and highlights their applications in bio-imaging, sensing, drug delivery, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and catalysis. The future applications of fluorescent metal NPs like thermal gradient optical imaging, single molecule optoelectronics, sensors, and optical components of the detector are also envisaged. Full article
Figures

2015

Jump to: 2017, 2016

Open AccessReview Turbulent Drag Reduction with Polymers in Rotating Disk Flow
Polymers 2015, 7(7), 1279-1298; doi:10.3390/polym7071279
Received: 2 April 2015 / Revised: 1 July 2015 / Accepted: 2 July 2015 / Published: 13 July 2015
Cited by 3 | PDF Full-text (1823 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The frictional drag in turbulent flow can be drastically reduced by the addition of minute amounts of suitable linear flexible high-molecular-weight polymers, and the various physical characteristics of the polymers used are known to be closely related to the drag reduction efficiency. This
[...] Read more.
The frictional drag in turbulent flow can be drastically reduced by the addition of minute amounts of suitable linear flexible high-molecular-weight polymers, and the various physical characteristics of the polymers used are known to be closely related to the drag reduction efficiency. This feature article briefly reviews polymer additives and factors in the system affecting turbulent drag reduction in external flow, more specifically in a rotating disk flow. Full article
Figures

Journal Contact

MDPI AG
Polymers Editorial Office
St. Alban-Anlage 66, 4052 Basel, Switzerland
E-Mail: 
Tel. +41 61 683 77 34
Fax: +41 61 302 89 18
Editorial Board
Contact Details Submit to Polymers Edit a special issue Review for Polymers
logo
loading...
Back to Top