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Special Issue "Renewable Energy and Sustainability"

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A special issue of Sustainability (ISSN 2071-1050).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 October 2009)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Dr. Christopher J. Koroneos

Unit of Environmental Science and Technology, School of Chemical Engineering 9, Iroon Polytechneiou St., Zographou Campus, 157 73, Athens
E-Mail
Fax: +30 210 7723285
Interests: Life Cycle Assessment: products and processes analysis; eco-design of products and processes; LCA of energy systems; assessment of natural resources use; Process Engineering: process design of environmental systems; simulation of environmental and chemical systems; environmental process synthesis; reaction synthesis; optimisation of single and multiple objectives; modelling and control of polymerisation reactors; dynamic simulation of systems; desalination; Environmental Engineering: management of solid and liquid wastes and air pollution; pollution prevention and control; Energy Engineering: exergy analysis; energy conservation in the industry; renewable energy systems; geothermal; biomass; solar, and wind; biofuels; energy co-generation; coal combustion; gasification and liquefaction; biomass gasification

Special Issue Information

Introduction: Renewable Energy and Sustainability
Christopher J. Koroneos
Guest Editor

Related MDPI Journal: Energies

Keywords

  • Renewable Energy
  • Sustainability
  • Environmental Impact

Published Papers (8 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle Preliminary Study of Passive Cooling Strategy Using a Combination of PCM and Copper Foam to Increase Thermal Heat Storage in Building Facade
Sustainability 2010, 2(8), 2365-2381; doi:10.3390/su2082365
Received: 27 June 2010 / Accepted: 23 July 2010 / Published: 27 July 2010
Cited by 12 | PDF Full-text (539 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The innovation of phase change material (PCM) for thermal heat storage is one sustainable passive strategy that can be integrated into building designs. This research was conducted to study and evaluate the performance of the existing materials integrated with PCM and to propose
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The innovation of phase change material (PCM) for thermal heat storage is one sustainable passive strategy that can be integrated into building designs. This research was conducted to study and evaluate the performance of the existing materials integrated with PCM and to propose a design strategy that would improve the system. This research suggested copper foam as a medium to be integrated with microencapsulated PCM. Applications of these combined materials will benefit the industry by improving indoor environments and by delivering sufficient thermal comfort for residents as in the case study of the existing 1.6 million terrace houses in Malaysia. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Renewable Energy and Sustainability)
Open AccessArticle Sustainable Energy Development: The Key to a Stable Nigeria
Sustainability 2010, 2(6), 1558-1570; doi:10.3390/su2061558
Received: 20 April 2010 / Revised: 8 May 2010 / Accepted: 17 May 2010 / Published: 3 June 2010
Cited by 11 | PDF Full-text (466 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
This paper proposes the use of sustainable energy systems based on solar and biomass technologies to provide solutions to utility challenges in Nigeria and acute water shortage both in rural and urban areas of that country. The paper highlights the paradoxes of oil-rich
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This paper proposes the use of sustainable energy systems based on solar and biomass technologies to provide solutions to utility challenges in Nigeria and acute water shortage both in rural and urban areas of that country. The paper highlights the paradoxes of oil-rich Nigeria and the stark reality of social infrastructure deprivations in that country. Perennial power outages over many years have translated to the absence of or poorly-developed basic social infrastructures in Nigeria. The consequences of this lack have been an increase in abject poverty in rural and urban communities as well as the erosion of social order and threats to citizen and their property. This paper proposes the adaptation of two emerging technologies for building sustainable energy systems and the development of decentralized and sustainable energy sources as catalyst for much-needed social infrastructure development through the creation of Renewable Energy Business Incubators, creative lending strategies, NGO partnerships and shifting energy-distribution responsibilities. These changes will stimulate grassroots economies in the country, develop large quantities of much needed clean water, maintain acceptable standards of sanitation and improve the health and wellbeing of Nigerian communities. The proposed strategies are specific to the Nigerian context; however, the authors suggest that the same or similar strategies may provide energy and social infrastructure development solutions to other developing countries as well. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Renewable Energy and Sustainability)
Open AccessArticle Wind Technology: A Framework for the Evaluation of Innovations’ Impacts on the Diffusion Potential
Sustainability 2010, 2(3), 757-782; doi:10.3390/su2030757
Received: 21 December 2009 / Revised: 20 January 2010 / Accepted: 20 February 2010 / Published: 15 March 2010
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (312 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
This paper proposes a framework based on which innovations in wind power technologies can be evaluated from the standpoint of their contribution to diffusion expansion. The framework helps build up a missing link between the technical literature on innovations and policy-oriented contributions concerned
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This paper proposes a framework based on which innovations in wind power technologies can be evaluated from the standpoint of their contribution to diffusion expansion. The framework helps build up a missing link between the technical literature on innovations and policy-oriented contributions concerned with the diffusion potential of wind power in national energy systems. The ideas are applied for the evaluation of wind technology innovations adopted in Spain. The framework can help policy-makers prioritize their innovation objectives and funding, so as to support the adoption of innovations that deserve the highest priority, given the country’s resources and energy system characteristics. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Renewable Energy and Sustainability)
Open AccessArticle Socio-Cultural Dimensions of Cluster vs. Single Home Photovoltaic Solar Energy Systems in Rural Nepal
Sustainability 2010, 2(2), 494-504; doi:10.3390/su2020494
Received: 2 December 2009 / Accepted: 25 January 2010 / Published: 2 February 2010
PDF Full-text (1306 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
This paper analyzes the socio-cultural dimensions of obstacles facing solar photovoltaic projects in two villages in rural Nepal. The study was conducted in Humla District, Nepal, one of the most remote and impoverished regions of the country. There are no roads in the
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This paper analyzes the socio-cultural dimensions of obstacles facing solar photovoltaic projects in two villages in rural Nepal. The study was conducted in Humla District, Nepal, one of the most remote and impoverished regions of the country. There are no roads in the district, homes lack running water and villagers’ health suffers from high levels of indoor air pollution from open cooking/heating fires and the smoky torches traditionally burned for light. The introduction of solar energy is important to these villagers, as it removes one major source of indoor air pollution from homes and provides brighter light than the traditional torches. Solar energy is preferable in many villages in the region due to the lack of suitable streams or rivers for micro-hydroelectric projects. In the villages under study in this paper, in-home solar electricity is a novel and recent innovation, and was installed within the last three years in two different geo-spatial styles, depending upon the configuration of homes in the village. In some villages, houses are grouped together, while in others households are widely dispersed. In the former, solar photovoltaic systems were installed in a “cluster” fashion with multiple homes utilizing power from a central battery store under the control of the householder storing the battery bank. In villages with widely spaced households, a single home system was used so that each home had a separate solar photovoltaic array, wiring system and battery bank. It became clear that the cluster system was the sensible choice due to the geographic layout of certain villages, but this put people into management groups that did not always work well due to caste or other differences. This paper describes the two systems and their management and usage costs and benefits from the perspective of the villagers themselves. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Renewable Energy and Sustainability)
Open AccessArticle The Impact of Field Size on the Environment and Energy Crop Production Efficiency for a Sustainable Indigenous Bioenergy Supply Chain in the Republic of Ireland
Sustainability 2009, 1(4), 994-1011; doi:10.3390/su1040994
Received: 31 August 2009 / Accepted: 30 October 2009 / Published: 4 November 2009
Cited by 5 | PDF Full-text (336 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
This paper investigates, using the GIS platform, the potential impacts of meeting national bioenergy targets using only indigenous sources of feedstock on the habitats and carbon stores that exist within Ireland’s field boundaries. A survey of the Republic of Irelands field was conducted
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This paper investigates, using the GIS platform, the potential impacts of meeting national bioenergy targets using only indigenous sources of feedstock on the habitats and carbon stores that exist within Ireland’s field boundaries. A survey of the Republic of Irelands field was conducted in order to estimate and map the size and geographic distribution of the Republic of Ireland’s field boundaries. The planting and harvesting costs associated with possible bioenergy crop production systems were determined using the relationship between the seasonal operating efficiency and the average field size. The results indicate that Ireland will need a large proportion of its current agricultural area (at least 16.5%) in order to its meet national bioenergy targets by 2020. The demand cannot be met by the current area that both has suitable soil type for growing the bioenergy crops and is large enough for the required operating efficiency. The results of this study indicate that implementing and meeting national bioenergy targets using only indigenous feedstock will likely impact the country’s field boundary resources negatively, as crop producers seek to improve production efficiency through field consolidation and field boundary removal. It was found that such boundary removal results in a loss of up to 6 tC/km2 and 0.7 ha/km of previously permanent habitat where average field size is small. The impact of field consolidation on these resources reduces substantially as larger fields become consolidated. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Renewable Energy and Sustainability)
Open AccessArticle The Growth Delusion
Sustainability 2009, 1(3), 516-536; doi:10.3390/su1030516
Received: 2 July 2009 / Accepted: 19 August 2009 / Published: 24 August 2009
Cited by 4 | PDF Full-text (200 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Concern for the environment and a move towards “sustainable development” has assisted progress in a wide range of renewable energy technologies in recent years. The science suggests that a transition from fossil fuels to sustainable sources of energy in a time frame commensurate
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Concern for the environment and a move towards “sustainable development” has assisted progress in a wide range of renewable energy technologies in recent years. The science suggests that a transition from fossil fuels to sustainable sources of energy in a time frame commensurate with the demise of the fossil fuels and prevention of runaway climate change is needed. However, while the movement towards sustainable energy technologies is underway, the World does not want to give up the idea of continuing economic growth. In recent times the financial collapse of October 2008 has given rise to yet another set of pleas from corporations and politicians alike to restart the growth machine. The transition to renewable energy technologies will be difficult to achieve as nowhere within existing economic and political frameworks are the limits to when growth will be curtailed being set. It is possible that the irrational insistence on endless growth as a non negotiable axiom, by a large proportion of the world’s population, may in fact be akin to the similarly irrational belief, by a similarly large proportion of the world’s population, that a supernatural being controls our existence and destiny. The irrationality of religion has recently been examined by Richard Dawkins in “The God Delusion”. Dawkins’ book is used as a starting point to investigate similarities between a belief in God and a belief in continuous growth. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Renewable Energy and Sustainability)

Review

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Open AccessReview Contribution of Renewable Energy Sources to the Sustainable Development of Islands: An Overview of the Literature and a Research Agenda
Sustainability 2010, 2(3), 783-811; doi:10.3390/su2030783
Received: 8 February 2010 / Revised: 3 March 2010 / Accepted: 12 March 2010 / Published: 17 March 2010
Cited by 5 | PDF Full-text (240 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Renewable energy sources (RES) have significant potential to contribute to the economic, social and environmental energy sustainability of small islands. They improve access to energy for most of the population, they also reduce emissions of local and global pollutants and they may create
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Renewable energy sources (RES) have significant potential to contribute to the economic, social and environmental energy sustainability of small islands. They improve access to energy for most of the population, they also reduce emissions of local and global pollutants and they may create local socioeconomic development opportunities. The aim of this paper is to provide a review of the theoretical and empirical literature on the contribution of RES to the energy sustainability of islands, focusing on the main results and the methodologies used. Papers are classified according to their coverage of the three dimensions of the triangular approach to sustainability (economic, environmental and social). The review also takes into account whether and how the procedural sustainability has been tackled in those papers. It is acknowledged that although several topics have been covered by the existing literature, there are promising avenues for future research on several fronts, both thematic and methodological. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Renewable Energy and Sustainability)
Open AccessReview Biofuels and the Lessons of Easter Island
Sustainability 2009, 1(3), 335-345; doi:10.3390/su1030335
Received: 27 April 2009 / Accepted: 14 July 2009 / Published: 20 July 2009
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (430 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The return to land-based biofuels ignores the lessons of the past that led to the collapse of civilizations such as that of Easter Island. Even the more efficient ethanol feedstocks such as sugar cane and switchgrass can greatly worsen the environmental damage associated
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The return to land-based biofuels ignores the lessons of the past that led to the collapse of civilizations such as that of Easter Island. Even the more efficient ethanol feedstocks such as sugar cane and switchgrass can greatly worsen the environmental damage associated with agriculture because they would require enormous amounts of land to meet US demand for transportation fuel. Too often, style wins over substance because most citizens do not know the basics of well-to-wheel analysis. Therefore, the incorporation of energy literacy into the high school curricula should play a significant role in any comprehensive plan for addressing the energy crisis. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Renewable Energy and Sustainability)

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