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Special Issue "Impact of Climate on Hydrological Extremes"

A special issue of Water (ISSN 2073-4441).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 March 2018

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Prof. Salvatore Manfreda

DICEM – University of Basilicata, Italy
Website | E-Mail
Phone: 0039 0971 205139
Interests: distributed modeling; flood prediction; delineation of flood prone areas; stochastic processes in hydrology; space-time rainfall dynamics; soil moisture process; low flow mathematical filters; vegetation patterns; UAS-based monitoring
Guest Editor
Prof. Vito Iacobellis

Politecnico di Bari, Italy
E-Mail
Phone: 0039 080 5963565
Interests: distributed hydrologic modeling; flood frequency; hydraulic risk assessment; derived distributions; space-time rainfall process and modeling; water balance assessment; crop growth models; climate change
Guest Editor
Prof. Andrea Gioia

DICATECh – Politecnico di Bari, Italy
E-Mail
Phone: 0039 0805963299
Interests: hydrological extremes; flood frequency analysis; derived distributions; nonlinearity effects in the process of flood generation; geomorphological descriptors for flood prone areas evaluation; climate change
Guest Editor
Prof. Mauro Fiorentino

DICEM – University of Basilicata, Italy
E-Mail
Phone: 00390971 205140
Interests: hydrology; geomorphology; complex systems
Guest Editor
Prof. Krzysztof Kochanek

Institute of Geophysics Polish Academy of Sciences, Poland
E-Mail
Phone: +48 22 6915-862
Interests: statistical models used in hydrology; robustness of parameter estimation methods; seasonal approach to modeling the maximum annual flow; modeling of flooding and river instability; deterministic modeling of groundwater and surface water flows; decision making under risk and uncertainty

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

High and low flows and associated floods and droughts are extreme hydrological phenomena caused by meteorological anomalies and modified by various catchment processes and human activities. They exert an increasing amount of damage to human, economic, and natural environmental systems in the world. In this context, global climate change along with local fluctuations may eventually trigger a disproportionate response in hydrological extremes.

This Special Issue will focus upon observed extreme events in a recent past, how these extremes are linked to changing global/regional climate, and the manner in which they may shift in the coming years. Papers dealing with physical mechanisms underlying past, present and future climatic extremes, both from the observational and the modelling points of view would be particularly welcome.

The main objectives are:

- to foster the understanding of the governing processes of hydrological extremes;
- to present methods and practical applications for i) flood and drought monitoring, ii) estimating flood and drought frequency, spatial patterns and short-term and long-term variability, and iii) predicting hydrological extremes in near real-time and in the future; 
- to address the potential impacts of global change, including climate and land use changes on hydrological extremes,
- to discuss regionalisation methods for predicting hydrological extremes in ungauged catchments,
- to investigate on the mutual interaction between human activities and hydrological extremes;
- to assess the role of different sources of information from paleofloods to remote sensing images in reducing the uncertainty of the prediction of hydrological extremes.  Both general methodological contributions and case studies of hydrological extremes in different regions covering a wide range of spatial scales are welcome.

Prof. Salvatore Manfreda
Prof. Vito Iacobellis
Prof. Andrea Gioia
Prof. Mauro Fiorentino
Prof. Krzysztof Kochanek
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Water is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Flood;
  • Droughts
  • Climate change
  • Non-stationary processes
  • Flash floods

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle Changes in Extreme Precipitation: A Case Study in the Middle and Lower Reaches of the Yangtze River in China
Water 2017, 9(12), 943; doi:10.3390/w9120943
Received: 20 September 2017 / Revised: 29 November 2017 / Accepted: 30 November 2017 / Published: 4 December 2017
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Abstract
Monitoring extreme climate events is of great importance, mainly due to increasingly severe impacts of extreme climate on nature and humanity. However, the characteristics of extreme climate events, especially extreme precipitation, frequently show complex variations in the context of climate change. Taking the
[...] Read more.
Monitoring extreme climate events is of great importance, mainly due to increasingly severe impacts of extreme climate on nature and humanity. However, the characteristics of extreme climate events, especially extreme precipitation, frequently show complex variations in the context of climate change. Taking the middle and lower reaches of the Yangtze River (MLR-YR) in China as a case study, extreme daily precipitation during 1961–2012 was analyzed from the aspects of frequency and intensity. The changes in extreme daily precipitation in the MLR-YR were further attributed to several factors, including large-scale circulation, hydrologic engineering and local topography. Our analyses indicate that both frequency and intensity of the extreme daily precipitation in the MLR-YR showed overall increasing trends from 1961 to 2012. The increase could be associated with weakened East Asian summer monsoon in past decades. In addition, inverse trends could also be found locally between the frequency and the intensity. For instance, extreme precipitation intensity revealed an enhanced trend in the western part of the middle reach of the Yangtze River, while extreme precipitation frequency showed decreasing trends in this region. These phenomena could be associated with the effects of some local factors (e.g., lake regulation, hydropower engineering, topography). Our study highlights the important role of local factors on extreme precipitation changes. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Impact of Climate on Hydrological Extremes)
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Open AccessArticle Spatiotemporal Variability of Extreme Summer Precipitation over the Yangtze River Basin and the Associations with Climate Patterns
Water 2017, 9(11), 873; doi:10.3390/w9110873
Received: 28 August 2017 / Revised: 6 November 2017 / Accepted: 7 November 2017 / Published: 9 November 2017
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Abstract
Understanding the spatiotemporal variability of seasonal extreme precipitation and its linkage with climate patterns is of great importance for water resource management over the Yangtze River Basin. Hence, this study examined the spatiotemporal variability of seasonal extreme precipitation through the archetypal analysis (AA),
[...] Read more.
Understanding the spatiotemporal variability of seasonal extreme precipitation and its linkage with climate patterns is of great importance for water resource management over the Yangtze River Basin. Hence, this study examined the spatiotemporal variability of seasonal extreme precipitation through the archetypal analysis (AA), by which observations were decomposed and characterized as several extreme modes. Six archetypes were identified and can obviously exhibit the features of events with above average or below average precipitation. Summer precipitation is the most variable compared to the winter, spring, and autumn precipitation through the trend analysis. It ranged from extremely dry (A6) to normal (A1 and A2) to extremely wet (A4). Climate teleconnections to the four archetypes for summer precipitation and relative importance of climate patterns were thus investigated. Results show that El Niño Southern Oscillation index is the strongest determinant of the ensuing archetypes representing the events with above average precipitation, while the Atlantic Multi-decadal Oscillation (AMO) contributes most to the events with below-average precipitation. A warm phase of the Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO) is significantly correlated with the above-average precipitation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Impact of Climate on Hydrological Extremes)
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Open AccessArticle Effective Use of Ensemble Numerical Weather Predictions in Taiwan by Means of a SOM-Based Cluster Analysis Technique
Water 2017, 9(11), 836; doi:10.3390/w9110836
Received: 29 August 2017 / Revised: 6 October 2017 / Accepted: 25 October 2017 / Published: 30 October 2017
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Abstract
Typhoon rainfall is one of the most important water resources in Taiwan. However, heavy rainfall during typhoons often leads to serious disasters. Therefore, accurate typhoon rainfall forecasts are always desired for water resources managers and disaster warning systems. In this study, the quantitative
[...] Read more.
Typhoon rainfall is one of the most important water resources in Taiwan. However, heavy rainfall during typhoons often leads to serious disasters. Therefore, accurate typhoon rainfall forecasts are always desired for water resources managers and disaster warning systems. In this study, the quantitative rainfall forecasts from an ensemble numerical weather prediction system in Taiwan are used. Furthermore, a novel strategy, which is based on the use of a self-organizing map (SOM) based cluster analysis technique, is proposed to integrate these ensemble forecasts. By means of the SOM-based cluster analysis technique, ensemble forecasts that have similar features are clustered. That is helpful for users to effectively combine these ensemble forecasts for providing better typhoon rainfall forecasts. To clearly demonstrate the advantage of the proposed strategy, actual application is conducted during five typhoon events. The results indicate that the ensemble rainfall forecasts from numerical weather prediction models are well categorized by the SOM-based cluster analysis technique. Moreover, the integrated typhoon rainfall forecasts resulting from the proposed strategy are more accurate when compared to those from the conventional method (i.e., the ensemble mean of all forecasts). In conclusion, the proposed strategy provides improved forecasts of typhoon rainfall. The improved quantitative rainfall forecasts are expected to be useful to support disaster warning systems as well as water resources management systems during typhoons. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Impact of Climate on Hydrological Extremes)
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