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Special Issue "Challenges and Developments on Water Resources Management in Central Asia"

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A special issue of Water (ISSN 2073-4441).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (28 February 2010)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Dr. Iskandar Abdullaev (Website)

Transboundary Water Management in Central Asia Programme Deutsche Gesellschaft fur Internationale Zusammenarbeit (GIZ) GmbH Abdullaev Str. 2a Yakkasaroy Rayon, Uzbekistan
Fax: +998 71 140 04 45
Interests: water resources management; irrigation; water users associations; socio-technical analysis

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The water management in post soviet Central Asia is becoming more a social and political process rather than a straightforward techno-technological issue. Nowadays, there is not any more a “proletariat and rural working class” in Central Asia, rather a much more diverse group of agricultural producers with different interests and resources. The message to the policy makers, rural developers and international donors is that if the emerging trends in water management are ignored, the reform or rehabilitation plans will most likely fail to improve the irrigation water management. The technical artefacts, such as rehabilitation of the irrigation system, improving pumps, and decreasing losses, alone do not address the growing social differentiation and competition for water. In this context, the best option would be to couple such technological solutions with very thoroughly designed socio-institutional measures.

Iskandar Abdullaev, Ph. D.
Guest Editor

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle Impact of Water Availability on Land and Water Productivity: A Temporal and Spatial Analysis of the Case Study Region Khorezm, Uzbekistan
Water 2010, 2(3), 668-684; doi:10.3390/w2030668
Received: 10 August 2010 / Revised: 3 September 2010 / Accepted: 15 September 2010 / Published: 19 September 2010
Cited by 8 | PDF Full-text (420 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Since irrigation water is assumedly the predominant factor determining crop yield, the difference in irrigation water availability across the administrative sub-districts of the Khorezm region, Central Asia, also inflicts an unequal distribution of agricultural revenues. Considering the national aim of a fair [...] Read more.
Since irrigation water is assumedly the predominant factor determining crop yield, the difference in irrigation water availability across the administrative sub-districts of the Khorezm region, Central Asia, also inflicts an unequal distribution of agricultural revenues. Considering the national aim of a fair distribution and efficient use of resources, here we analyze the relationships between irrigation water access and rural welfare from 2000 to 2007 by descriptive statistics. Analyses revealed not only the general dependency of agricultural revenue on irrigation water availability, but also occurrence of low land productivity during water scarce years and, irrespective of the annual water availability, in some tail end regions each year. Furthermore, apart from irrigation water availability, land productivity was also impacted by soil quality, cropping structure, and type of land ownership. Fair distribution of water and land resources should also take into consideration population density. It is argued that an anticipated equal and efficient water allocation necessitates improved irrigation water conveyance, distribution, and application efficiency via best water management practices. Liberalization of markets, development of a market infrastructure and improvement in yields also contribute to increased land and water productivity. Full article
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Open AccessArticle Facts and Perspectives of Water Reservoirs in Central Asia: A Special Focus on Uzbekistan
Water 2010, 2(2), 307-320; doi:10.3390/w2020307
Received: 14 May 2010 / Accepted: 11 June 2010 / Published: 23 June 2010
Cited by 12 | PDF Full-text (423 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The political transformation of the Central Asian region has induced the implosion of the interconnected physical hydraulic infrastructure and its institutional management system. Land-locked Central Asian countries, with their climatic conditions and transboundary water resources, have been striving to meet their food [...] Read more.
The political transformation of the Central Asian region has induced the implosion of the interconnected physical hydraulic infrastructure and its institutional management system. Land-locked Central Asian countries, with their climatic conditions and transboundary water resources, have been striving to meet their food security, to increase agricultural production, to sustain energy sectors, and to protect the environment. The existing water reservoirs are strategic infrastructures for irrigation and hydropower generation. Upstream countries (Tajikistan and Kyrgyzstan) favor the reservoirs’ operation for energy supply, while downstream countries (Uzbekistan, Turkmenistan and Kazakhstan) push for irrigation use. This paper provides an overview of the current challenges and perspectives (technical, institutional, and legal regulations) and presents recommendations for the sustainable management of man-made water reservoirs in Uzbekistan. Full article
Open AccessArticle Pros and Cons of Adopting Water-Wise Approaches in the Lower Reaches of the Amu Darya: A Socio-Economic View
Water 2010, 2(2), 200-216; doi:10.3390/w2020200
Received: 1 March 2010 / Revised: 18 March 2010 / Accepted: 6 May 2010 / Published: 20 May 2010
Cited by 16 | PDF Full-text (194 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The increased frequency of water shortages parallel to growing demands for agricultural commodities in the lower reaches of the Amu Darya River, Central Asia, calls for improving the system-level water use efficiency, by using interventions at the field level. Despite the existence [...] Read more.
The increased frequency of water shortages parallel to growing demands for agricultural commodities in the lower reaches of the Amu Darya River, Central Asia, calls for improving the system-level water use efficiency, by using interventions at the field level. Despite the existence of various best practices of effective water use (defined here as “water-wise options”), they are not widely adopted by farmers owing to high initial costs of investment and lack of the necessary knowledge and skills of a new generation of farmers after the Soviet era. For assessing the potential of several water-wise techniques, key indicators such as water use reduction rate (WURR), economic efficiency (EE), and financial viability (FV) were combined with expert surveys. A SWOT procedure was used to analyze the (dis)advantages, opportunities and constraints of adopting the selected water-wise methods. Results show that the examined options have substantial potential for increasing water use efficiency under promising EE. The various recommendations aim at improving the sustainability of irrigation water use. Full article
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