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Special Issue "Selected Papers from the 25th International Conference on Efficiency, Cost, Optimization, Simulation and Environmental Impact of Energy Systems (ECOS2012)"

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A special issue of Energies (ISSN 1996-1073).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (15 September 2012)

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Enrico Sciubba (Website)

Room 32, Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of Roma Sapienza, Via Eudossiana 18, 00184 Roma, Italy
Phone: +39-06-44585244
Fax: +39 06 44 58 52 49
Interests: turbomachinery CFD; turbulence modelling; exergy analysis of complex systems; engineering applications of AI to thermal conversion processes
Guest Editor
Professor Giampaolo Manfrida

Department of Energy Engineering, University of Florence, Viale Giovanbattista Morgagni 40, 50135 Firenze, Italy

Published Papers (9 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle A Co-Powered Biomass and Concentrated Solar Power Rankine Cycle Concept for Small Size Combined Heat and Power Generation
Energies 2013, 6(3), 1478-1496; doi:10.3390/en6031478
Received: 17 November 2012 / Revised: 11 January 2013 / Accepted: 25 February 2013 / Published: 6 March 2013
Cited by 3 | PDF Full-text (699 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The present work investigates the matching of an advanced small scale Combined Heat and Power (CHP) Rankine cycle plant with end-user thermal and electric load. The power plant consists of a concentrated solar power field co-powered by a biomass furnace to produce [...] Read more.
The present work investigates the matching of an advanced small scale Combined Heat and Power (CHP) Rankine cycle plant with end-user thermal and electric load. The power plant consists of a concentrated solar power field co-powered by a biomass furnace to produce steam in a Rankine cycle, with a CHP configuration. A hotel was selected as the end user due to its high thermal to electric consumption ratio. The power plant design and its operation were modelled and investigated by adopting transient simulations with an hourly distribution. The study of the load matching of the proposed renewable power technology and the final user has been carried out by comparing two different load tracking scenarios, i.e., the thermal and the electric demands. As a result, the power output follows fairly well the given load curves, supplying, on a selected winter day, about 50 GJ/d of thermal energy and the 6 GJ/d of electric energy, with reduced energy dumps when matching the load. Full article
Open AccessArticle Development of Specific Rules for the Application of Life Cycle Assessment to Carbon Capture and Storage
Energies 2013, 6(3), 1250-1265; doi:10.3390/en6031250
Received: 2 November 2012 / Revised: 1 February 2013 / Accepted: 20 February 2013 / Published: 4 March 2013
Cited by 8 | PDF Full-text (210 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) is a very innovative and promising solution for greenhouse gases (GHG) reduction, i.e., capturing carbon dioxide (CO2) at its source and storing it indefinitely to avoid its release to the atmosphere. This paper investigates [...] Read more.
Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) is a very innovative and promising solution for greenhouse gases (GHG) reduction, i.e., capturing carbon dioxide (CO2) at its source and storing it indefinitely to avoid its release to the atmosphere. This paper investigates a set of key issues in the development of specific rules for the application of Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) to CCS. The following LCA-based information are addressed in this work: definition of service type, definition of functional unit, definition of system boundaries, choice of allocation rules, choice of selected Life Cycle Inventory (LCI) results or other selected parameters for description of environmental performance. From a communication perspective, the specific rules defined in this study have been developed coherently with the requirements of a type III environment label scheme, the International EPD® System, according to the ISO 14025 standard. Full article
Open AccessArticle Exergy and Exergoeconomic Model of a Ground-Based CAES Plant for Peak-Load Energy Production
Energies 2013, 6(2), 1050-1067; doi:10.3390/en6021050
Received: 7 November 2012 / Revised: 11 December 2012 / Accepted: 22 January 2013 / Published: 19 February 2013
Cited by 11 | PDF Full-text (930 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Compressed Air Energy Storage is recognized as a promising technology for applying energy storage to grids which are more and more challenged by the increasing contribution of renewable such as solar or wind energy. The paper proposes a medium-size ground-based CAES system, [...] Read more.
Compressed Air Energy Storage is recognized as a promising technology for applying energy storage to grids which are more and more challenged by the increasing contribution of renewable such as solar or wind energy. The paper proposes a medium-size ground-based CAES system, based on pressurized vessels and on a multiple-stage arrangement of compression and expansion machinery; the system includes recovery of heat from the intercoolers, and its storage as sensible heat in two separate (hot/cold) water reservoirs, and regenerative reheat of the expansions. The CAES plant parameters were adapted to the requirements of existing equipment (compressors, expanders and heat exchangers). A complete exergy analysis of the plant was performed. Most component cost data were procured from the market, asking specific quotations to the industrial providers. It is thus possible to calculate the final cost of the electricity unit (kWh) produced under peak-load mode, and to identify the relative contribution between the two relevant groups of capital and component inefficiencies costs. Full article
Open AccessArticle A Comparison of Optimal Operation of a Residential Fuel Cell Co-Generation System Using Clustered Demand Patterns Based on Kullback-Leibler Divergence
Energies 2013, 6(1), 374-399; doi:10.3390/en6010374
Received: 9 November 2012 / Revised: 3 December 2012 / Accepted: 21 December 2012 / Published: 16 January 2013
Cited by 4 | PDF Full-text (3248 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
When evaluating residential energy systems like co-generation systems, hot water and electricity demand profiles are critical. In this paper, the authors aim to extract basic time-series demand patterns from two kinds of measured demand (electricity and domestic hot water), and also aim [...] Read more.
When evaluating residential energy systems like co-generation systems, hot water and electricity demand profiles are critical. In this paper, the authors aim to extract basic time-series demand patterns from two kinds of measured demand (electricity and domestic hot water), and also aim to reveal effective demand patterns for primary energy saving. Time-series demand data are categorized with a hierarchical clustering method using a statistical pseudo-distance, which is represented by the generalized Kullback-Leibler divergence of two Gaussian mixture distributions. The classified demand patterns are built using hierarchical clustering and then a comparison is made between the optimal operation of a polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell co-generation system and the operation of a reference system (a conventional combination of a condensing gas boiler and electricity purchased from the grid) using the appropriately built demand profiles. Our results show that basic demand patterns are extracted by the proposed method, and the heat-to-power ratio of demand, the amount of daily demand, and demand patterns affect the primary energy saving of the co-generation system. Full article
Open AccessArticle Burning Behaviour of High-Pressure CH4-H2-Air Mixtures
Energies 2013, 6(1), 97-116; doi:10.3390/en6010097
Received: 8 November 2012 / Revised: 7 December 2012 / Accepted: 20 December 2012 / Published: 2 January 2013
Cited by 6 | PDF Full-text (8980 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Experimental characterization of the burning behavior of gaseous mixtures has been carried out, analyzing spherical expanding flames. Tests were performed in the Device for Hydrogen-Air Reaction Mode Analysis (DHARMA) laboratory of Istituto Motori—CNR. Based on a high-pressure, constant-volume bomb, the activity is [...] Read more.
Experimental characterization of the burning behavior of gaseous mixtures has been carried out, analyzing spherical expanding flames. Tests were performed in the Device for Hydrogen-Air Reaction Mode Analysis (DHARMA) laboratory of Istituto Motori—CNR. Based on a high-pressure, constant-volume bomb, the activity is aimed at populating a systematic database on the burning properties of CH4, H2 and other species of interest, in conditions typical of internal combustion (i.c.) engines and gas turbines. High-speed shadowgraph is used to record the flame growth, allowing to infer the laminar burning parameters and the flame stability properties. Mixtures of CH4, H2 and air have been analyzed at initial temperature 293÷305 K, initial pressure 3÷18 bar and equivalence ratio  = 1.0. The amount of H2 in the mixture was 0%, 20% and 30% (vol.). The effect of the initial pressure and of the Hydrogen content on the laminar burning velocity and the Markstein length has been evaluated: the relative weight and mutual interaction has been assessed of the two controlling parameters. Analysis has been carried out of the flame instability, expressed in terms of the critical radius for the onset of cellularity, as a function of the operating conditions. Full article
Figures

Open AccessArticle Simulation of Synthesis Gas Production from Steam Oxygen Gasification of Colombian Coal Using Aspen Plus®
Energies 2012, 5(12), 4924-4940; doi:10.3390/en5124924
Received: 18 September 2012 / Revised: 6 November 2012 / Accepted: 12 November 2012 / Published: 23 November 2012
Cited by 7 | PDF Full-text (735 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
A steady state simulation of syngas production from a Steam Oxygen Gasification process using commercial technologies was performed using Aspen Plus®. For the simulation, the average proximate and ultimate compositions of bituminous coal obtained from the Colombian Andean region were [...] Read more.
A steady state simulation of syngas production from a Steam Oxygen Gasification process using commercial technologies was performed using Aspen Plus®. For the simulation, the average proximate and ultimate compositions of bituminous coal obtained from the Colombian Andean region were employed. The simulation was applied to conduct sensitivity analyses in the O2 to coal mass ratio, coal slurry concentration, WGS operating temperature and WGS steam to dry gas molar ratio (SDG) over the key parameters: syngas molar composition, overall CO conversion in the WGS reactors, H2 rich-syngas lower heating value (LHV) and thermal efficiency. The achieved information allows the selection of critical operating conditions leading to improve system efficiency and environmental performance. The results indicate that the oxygen to carbon ratio is a key variable as it affects significantly both the LHV and thermal efficiency. Nevertheless, the process becomes almost insensitive to SDG values higher than 2. Finally, a thermal efficiency of 62.6% can be reached. This result corresponds to a slurry solid concentration of 0.65, a WGS process SDG of 0.59, and a LTS reactor operating temperature of 473 K. With these fixed variables, a syngas with H2 molar composition of 92.2% and LHV of 12 MJ Nm−3 was attained. Full article
Open AccessArticle Concept Development of Optimal Mine Site Energy Supply
Energies 2012, 5(11), 4726-4745; doi:10.3390/en5114726
Received: 13 August 2012 / Revised: 23 October 2012 / Accepted: 7 November 2012 / Published: 19 November 2012
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (521 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
This paper reports on early work and concept development for Optimal Mine Site Energy Supply, where the specific energy supply requirements and constraints for mineral production operations are considered against methodologies that have been applied for other sectors and in other energy [...] Read more.
This paper reports on early work and concept development for Optimal Mine Site Energy Supply, where the specific energy supply requirements and constraints for mineral production operations are considered against methodologies that have been applied for other sectors and in other energy policy regimes. The primary motivation for this research is to help ensure that Canadian mineral producers will achieve reduced production costs through improvements in the efficiency with which they consume energy resources. Heat has not yet been considered for the mining sector in an integrated manner, which makes polygeneration of great interest. The methodology that optimizes configuration of polygeneration systems for mine sites has not been reported before. The variety of mining circumstances, temporal variations in energy prices, institutional inertia, and conservatism in design for mines are some of the reasons for this. This paper reviews some aspects of precedent energy management practice in mineral operations, which highlights energy challenges characteristic of the sector and sets out the initial formulation of optimal mine site energy supply. The review indicates the additional benefits of energy supply systems for mine sites that concurrently meet all utilities. Full article
Open AccessArticle Parabolic Trough Photovoltaic/Thermal Collectors: Design and Simulation Model
Energies 2012, 5(10), 4186-4208; doi:10.3390/en5104186
Received: 30 July 2012 / Revised: 25 September 2012 / Accepted: 16 October 2012 / Published: 23 October 2012
Cited by 15 | PDF Full-text (417 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
This paper presents a design procedure and a simulation model of a novel concentrating PVT collector. The layout of the PVT system under investigation was derived from a prototype recently presented in literature and commercially available. The prototype consisted in a parabolic [...] Read more.
This paper presents a design procedure and a simulation model of a novel concentrating PVT collector. The layout of the PVT system under investigation was derived from a prototype recently presented in literature and commercially available. The prototype consisted in a parabolic trough concentrator and a linear triangular receiver. In that prototype, the bottom surfaces of the receiver are equipped with mono-crystalline silicon cells whereas the top surface is covered by an absorbing surface. The aperture area of the parabola was covered by a glass in order to improve the thermal efficiency of the system. In the modified version of the collector considered in this paper, two changes are implemented: the cover glass was eliminated and the mono-crystalline silicon cells were replaced by triple-junction cells. In order to analyze PVT performance, a detailed mathematical model was implemented. This model is based on zero-dimensional energy balances. The simulation model calculates the temperatures of the main components of the system and the main energy flows Results showed that the performance of the system is excellent even when the fluid temperature is very high (>100 °C). Conversely, both electrical and thermal efficiencies dramatically decrease when the incident beam radiation decreases. Full article
Open AccessArticle Residential Solar-Based Seasonal Thermal Storage Systems in Cold Climates: Building Envelope and Thermal Storage
Energies 2012, 5(10), 3972-3985; doi:10.3390/en5103972
Received: 21 August 2012 / Revised: 26 September 2012 / Accepted: 8 October 2012 / Published: 16 October 2012
Cited by 4 | PDF Full-text (320 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The reduction of electricity use for heating and domestic hot water in cold climates can be achieved by: (1) reducing the heating loads through the improvement of the thermal performance of house envelopes, and (2) using solar energy through a residential solar-based [...] Read more.
The reduction of electricity use for heating and domestic hot water in cold climates can be achieved by: (1) reducing the heating loads through the improvement of the thermal performance of house envelopes, and (2) using solar energy through a residential solar-based thermal storage system. First, this paper presents the life cycle energy and cost analysis of a typical one-storey detached house, located in Montreal, Canada. Simulation of annual energy use is performed using the TRNSYS software. Second, several design alternatives with improved thermal resistance for walls, ceiling and windows, increased overall air tightness, and increased window-to-wall ratio of South facing windows are evaluated with respect to the life cycle energy use, life cycle emissions and life cycle cost. The solution that minimizes the energy demand is chosen as a reference house for the study of long-term thermal storage. Third, the computer simulation of a solar heating system with solar thermal collectors and long-term thermal storage capacity is presented. Finally, the life cycle cost and life cycle energy use of the solar combisystem are estimated for flat-plate solar collectors and evacuated tube solar collectors, respectively, for the economic and climatic conditions of this study. Full article

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