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Special Issue "Low Carbon Energy Systems"

A special issue of Energies (ISSN 1996-1073).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 January 2019

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Prof. Rick Greenough

De Montfort University, The Gateway, Leicester, LE1 9BH, UK
Website | E-Mail
Interests: industrial sustainability, energy efficient manufacturing, energy systems, thermal storage
Guest Editor
Dr. Richard Snape

School of Engineering and Sustainable Development, De Montfort University, The Gateway, Leicester, LE1 9BH, UK
Website | E-Mail
Interests: smart grids; renewable energy; transition in socio-technical systems; complexity science and complex adaptive systems
Guest Editor
Dr. Muyiwa Oyinlola

School of Engineering and Sustainable Development, De Montfort University, The Gateway, Leicester, LE1 9BH, UK
Website | E-Mail
Interests: thermal energy storage; thermal energy transformation; heat transfer; energy in emerging economies, sustainable energy

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

There is now a widespread understanding in the research community about the technical performance of different low-carbon energy technologies, in both the supply and demand parts of the energy system. There is also a large body of research into energy policy and energy behaviour at the levels of both the individual and society. What often seems to be lacking is an understanding of why some low carbon energy technology deployments succeed and others that seem well-designed from a technical perspective nevertheless fail in practice. Perhaps this has to do with the integration of the social, economic and technical parts of the energy system. This Special Issue aims to highlight research into low-carbon energy systems in the context of the economic and social systems in which they operate. We are interested in research that explores the relationships between technology and scale (e.g., local mini-grids or national energy grids) or the relationship between technology and ownership structures, which might include the business model used to recover the costs of installation, operation and maintenance. Other topics of interest are the importance of usability in energy system design or whether the operation of future energy systems is best left to expert organisations who are paid for delivering energy services instead of kilowatt-hours. We are also keen to publish papers that explore the motivations to invest in low carbon energy technologies and the ways in which policy makers can ‘nudge’ individuals to invest or support low carbon energy policies.

Prof. Rick Greenough
Dr. Richard Snape
Dr. Muyiwa Oyinlola
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Energies is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Energy behaviour
  • Technology in society
  • Demand management
  • System integration
  • Energy services

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Open AccessArticle An Assessment of Near-to-Mid-Term Economic Impacts and Energy Transitions under “2 °C” and “1.5 °C” Scenarios for India
Energies 2018, 11(9), 2213; https://doi.org/10.3390/en11092213
Received: 8 August 2018 / Revised: 14 August 2018 / Accepted: 15 August 2018 / Published: 24 August 2018
PDF Full-text (2050 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
The goal of limiting global temperature rise to “well below” 2 °C has been reaffirmed in the Paris Agreement on climate change at the 21st Conference of the Parties (COP21). Almost all countries submitted their decarbonization targets in their Intended Nationally Determined Contributions
[...] Read more.
The goal of limiting global temperature rise to “well below” 2 °C has been reaffirmed in the Paris Agreement on climate change at the 21st Conference of the Parties (COP21). Almost all countries submitted their decarbonization targets in their Intended Nationally Determined Contributions (INDC) to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) and India did as well. India’s nationally determined contribution (NDC) aims to reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions intensity of national GDP in 2030 by 33–35% compared to 2005. This paper analyzes how India’s NDC commitments compare with emission trajectories consistent with well below 2 °C and 1.5 °C global temperature stabilization goals. A top-down computable general equilibrium model is used for the analysis. Our analysis shows that there are significant emission gaps between NDC and global climate stabilization targets in 2030. The energy system requires significant changes, mostly relying on renewable energy and carbon capture and storage (CCS) technology. The mitigation costs would increase if India delays its abatement efforts and is locked into NDC pathways till 2030. India’s GHG emissions would peak 10 years earlier under 1.5 °C global temperature stabilization compared to the 2 °C goal. The results imply that India would need financial and technological support from developed countries to achieve emissions reductions aligned with the global long-term goal. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Low Carbon Energy Systems)
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