Special Issue "Foodomics 2013"

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A special issue of Foods (ISSN 2304-8158).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 March 2014)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Francesco Capozzi (Website)

BioNMR Laboratory, Dept. Of Agro-Food Science and Technology, University of Bologna,Piazza Goidanich, 60, I-47521 Cesena (FC), Italy
Fax: +39 0547 382348
Interests: Foodomics; NMR spectroscopy; metabonomics; food molecular profiles; food digestion; multivariate analysis of spectroscopic data

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Since 2009 the biannual International Conference on Foodomics (www.foodomics.eu) is the scientific forum where academic and industrial scientists involved in food and nutrition research discuss about the most recent advances in the "omics" approach. Since that time, foodomics has been considered the holistic approach for discovering: (i) foods, food components and nutraceuticals; (ii) the nutrients bioaccessibility and their mechanisms of action; (iii) the role of digestion and of microbiota on the nutrients fate; (iv) nutrition and diet in clinical sciences. Aiming at this objective, food genomics, proteomics and metabolomics, together, provide the broadest vision about the link between nutrition and health. The science behind this innovative perspective requires a multi-disciplinary integration, not easy to achieve, because food technologists, nutritionists, chemists, clinicians and other specialists still lack a common ground for their interactions. This special issue aims to publish original research papers, innovative application results, technical articles, opinions, and reviews on different aspects of foodomics.

Prof. Dr. Francesco Capozzi
Guest Editor

Submission

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. Papers will be published continuously (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are refereed through a peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Foods is an international peer-reviewed Open Access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 300 CHF (Swiss Francs). English correction and/or formatting fees of 250 CHF (Swiss Francs) will be charged in certain cases for those articles accepted for publication that require extensive additional formatting and/or English corrections.

Keywords

  • food digestion
  • nutri-metabonomics
  • food proteomics
  • food genomics
  • microbiota
  • food molecular profiles

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle Comprehensive and Comparative Metabolomic Profiling of Wheat, Barley, Oat and Rye Using Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry and Advanced Chemometrics
Foods 2014, 3(4), 569-585; doi:10.3390/foods3040569
Received: 11 May 2014 / Revised: 20 August 2014 / Accepted: 13 October 2014 / Published: 31 October 2014
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (545 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Beyond the main bulk components of cereals such as the polysaccharides and proteins, lower concentration secondary metabolites largely contribute to the nutritional value. This paper outlines a comprehensive protocol for GC-MS metabolomic profiling of phenolics and organic acids in grains, the performance [...] Read more.
Beyond the main bulk components of cereals such as the polysaccharides and proteins, lower concentration secondary metabolites largely contribute to the nutritional value. This paper outlines a comprehensive protocol for GC-MS metabolomic profiling of phenolics and organic acids in grains, the performance of which is demonstrated through a comparison of the metabolite profiles of the main northern European cereal crops: wheat, barley, oat and rye. Phenolics and organic acids were extracted using acidic hydrolysis, trimethylsilylated using a new method based on trimethylsilyl cyanide and analyzed by GC-MS. In order to extract pure metabolite peaks, the raw chromatographic data were processed by a multi-way decomposition method, Parallel Factor Analysis 2. This approach lead to the semi-quantitative detection of a total of 247 analytes, out of which 89 were identified based on RI and EI-MS library match. The cereal metabolome included 32 phenolics, 30 organic acids, 10 fatty acids, 11 carbohydrates and 6 sterols. The metabolome of the four cereals were compared in detail, including low concentration phenolics and organic acids. Rye and oat displayed higher total concentration of phenolic acids, but ferulic, caffeic and sinapinic acids and their esters were found to be the main phenolics in all four cereals. Compared to the previously reported methods, the outlined protocol provided an efficient and high throughput analysis of the cereal metabolome and the acidic hydrolysis improved the detection of conjugated phenolics. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Foodomics 2013)
Open AccessArticle Saffron Samples of Different Origin: An NMR Study of Microwave-Assisted Extracts
Foods 2014, 3(3), 403-419; doi:10.3390/foods3030403
Received: 23 April 2014 / Revised: 30 May 2014 / Accepted: 16 June 2014 / Published: 8 July 2014
Cited by 3 | PDF Full-text (787 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
An NMR analytical protocol is proposed to characterize saffron samples of different geographical origin (Greece, Spain, Hungary, Turkey and Italy). A microwave-assisted extraction procedure was developed to obtain a comparable recovery of metabolites with respect to the ISO specifications, reducing the solvent [...] Read more.
An NMR analytical protocol is proposed to characterize saffron samples of different geographical origin (Greece, Spain, Hungary, Turkey and Italy). A microwave-assisted extraction procedure was developed to obtain a comparable recovery of metabolites with respect to the ISO specifications, reducing the solvent volume and the extraction time needed. Metabolite profiles of geographically different saffron extracts were compared showing significant differences in the content of some metabolites. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Foodomics 2013)
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Open AccessArticle 1H NMR Spectroscopy and Multivariate Analysis of Monovarietal EVOOs as a Tool for Modulating Coratina-Based Blends
Foods 2014, 3(2), 238-249; doi:10.3390/foods3020238
Received: 31 January 2014 / Revised: 26 March 2014 / Accepted: 8 April 2014 / Published: 17 April 2014
Cited by 4 | PDF Full-text (688 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Coratina cultivar-based olives are very common among 100% Italian extra virgin olive oils (EVOOs). Often, the very spicy character of this cultivar, mostly due to the high polyphenols concentration, requires blending with other “sweetener” oils. In this work, monovarietal EVOO samples from [...] Read more.
Coratina cultivar-based olives are very common among 100% Italian extra virgin olive oils (EVOOs). Often, the very spicy character of this cultivar, mostly due to the high polyphenols concentration, requires blending with other “sweetener” oils. In this work, monovarietal EVOO samples from the Coratina cultivar (Apulia, Italy) were investigated and compared with monovarietal EVOO from native or recently introduced Apulian (Italy) cultivars (Ogliarola Garganica, Ogliarola Barese, Cima di Mola, Peranzana, Picholine), from Calabria (Italy) (Carolea and Rossanese) and from other Mediterranean countries, such as Spain (Picual) and Greece (Kalamata and Koroneiki) by 1H NMR spectroscopy and multivariate analysis (principal component analysis (PCA)). In this regard, NMR signals could allow a first qualitative evaluation of the chemical composition of EVOO and, in particular, of its minor component content (phenols and aldehydes), an intrinsic behavior of EVOO taste, related to the cultivar and geographical origins. Moreover, this study offers an opportunity to address blended EVOOs tastes by using oils from a specific region or country of origin. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Foodomics 2013)
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Review

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Open AccessReview The “Dark Side” of Food Stuff Proteomics: The CPLL-Marshals Investigate
Foods 2014, 3(2), 217-237; doi:10.3390/foods3020217
Received: 4 February 2014 / Revised: 8 April 2014 / Accepted: 8 April 2014 / Published: 17 April 2014
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Abstract
The present review deals with analysis of the proteome of animal and plant-derived food stuff, as well as of non-alcoholic and alcoholic beverages. The survey is limited to those systems investigated with the help of combinatorial peptide ligand libraries, a most powerful [...] Read more.
The present review deals with analysis of the proteome of animal and plant-derived food stuff, as well as of non-alcoholic and alcoholic beverages. The survey is limited to those systems investigated with the help of combinatorial peptide ligand libraries, a most powerful technique allowing access to low- to very-low-abundance proteins, i.e., to those proteins that might characterize univocally a given biological system and, in the case of commercial food preparations, attest their genuineness or adulteration. Among animal foods the analysis of cow’s and donkey’s milk is reported, together with the proteomic composition of egg white and yolk, as well as of honey, considered as a hybrid between floral and animal origin. In terms of plant and fruits, a survey is offered of spinach, artichoke, banana, avocado, mango and lemon proteomics, considered as recalcitrant tissues in that small amounts of proteins are dispersed into a large body of plant polymers and metabolites. As examples of non-alcoholic beverages, ginger ale, coconut milk, a cola drink, almond milk and orgeat syrup are analyzed. Finally, the trace proteome of white and red wines, beer and aperitifs is reported, with the aim of tracing the industrial manipulations and herbal usage prior to their commercialization. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Foodomics 2013)

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