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Special Issue "GIS for Sustainable Urban Transport"

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A special issue of ISPRS International Journal of Geo-Information (ISSN 2220-9964).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 October 2014)

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Dr. Mark Zuidgeest

Center for Transport Studies, Department of Civil Engineering, Faculty of Engineering and the Built Environment, University of Cape Town, South Africa
Website | E-Mail
Interests: climate change and transport; accessibility mapping; land use – transport interaction; developing countries; non-motorized transport; spatial multi-criteria assessment; location-allocation models; transport engineering
Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Martin van Maarseveen

Department of Urban and Regional Planning and Geo-Information Management, Faculty of Geo-Information Science and Earth Observation (ITC), University of Twente, Enschede, The Netherlands
Website | E-Mail
Phone: +31-53-4874394
Fax: +31-53-4874575
Interests: transport modeling; transport planning methods and techniques; travel demand analysis; traffic safety; traffic simulation and dynamics; spatial decision support systems; evacuation modelling, urban planning; quality of life
Guest Editor
Dr. Mark Brussel

Department of Urban and Regional Planning and Geo-Information Management, Faculty of Geo-Information Science and Earth Observation (ITC), University of Twente, Enschede, The Netherlands
Website | E-Mail
Phone: +31-53-4874497
Fax: +31-53-4874575
Interests: infrastructure planning; infrastructure levels of service and performance; GIS network

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The world is urbanizing at a very fast pace.
Modern geography, particularly geo-information systems and global positioning systems, are reshaping the way urban and transport planners are collecting, exploring, synthesizing, analyzing, evaluating and presenting their data. Transport GIS (or GIS-T) applications have become mainstream in leading conferences and high-level publications.
Sustainable transport relates to creating transport systems that promote sustainability in terms of increasing social inclusion, reducing environmental externalities and being economically feasible. It involves the transport as well as the land use system. In the field of sustainable transport, GI science is typically used to aid the development of concepts and methodologies for clean and sustainable mobility. Whether looking at location-allocation models of public bicycle systems, mapping children’s routes to school, land use – transport interaction or calculating levels of accessibility to jobs for the urban poor, modern time GPS and GIS technologies are myriad.
This special issue therefore seeks to publish state-of-the-art research on GIS for sustainable transport including but not limited to:

•Spatial Data Infrastructures for sustainable transport
•Location-allocation models, for example for planning transit, public bike systems, infrastructure etc.
•Multi-modal network modeling approaches in GIS
•GPS/Mobile GIS applications in data collection for walking and cycling, e.g. walkability and cycleability
•Spatial Decision Support Systems (SDSS) in transport policy and planning
•Measuring Transit Oriented Development (TOD)
•Urban design and transport
•Satellite Remote Sensing for transport –related urban sustainability
•Mapping transport sustainability indicators, including transport quality of life
•Collaborative mapping and the role of mapping institutions
•Accessibility analysis, for example for BRT systems, railway, social services, health care etc.
•Transport-related social and spatial exclusion, incl. gender issues
•Sustainable safety
•Agent Based Modelling
•Dynamic land use – transport interaction, etc.

We welcome a mix of articles from both developing and developed countries.

Dr. Mark Zuidgeest
Prof. Dr. Martin van Maarseveen
Ir. Mark Brussel
Guest Editors

Submission

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. Papers will be published continuously (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are refereed through a peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. ISPRS International Journal of Geo-Information is an international peer-reviewed Open Access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 900 CHF (Swiss Francs).


Keywords

•GIS-T
•network modeling
•accessibility
•walkability and cycleability
•transit oriented development
•GPS surveys and mobile GIS applications
•land use - transport interaction
•spatial data infrastructures
•location-allocation models
•public bike systems
•public transport
•non-motorized transport
•urbanization
•social and spatial exclusion
•transport planning
•impact assessment
•SMCA
•transport and climate change
•evacuation modelling

Published Papers (7 papers)

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Editorial

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Open AccessEditorial GIS for Sustainable Urban Transport
ISPRS Int. J. Geo-Inf. 2015, 4(4), 2583-2585; doi:10.3390/ijgi4042583
Received: 12 November 2015 / Revised: 12 November 2015 / Accepted: 16 November 2015 / Published: 23 November 2015
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (96 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract The world is urbanizing at a very fast pace. Modern geography, particularly geo-information systems (GIS) and global positioning systems (GPS) are reshaping the way urban and transport planners are collecting, exploring, synthesizing, analyzing, evaluating and presenting their data. [...] Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue GIS for Sustainable Urban Transport)

Research

Jump to: Editorial

Open AccessArticle Using Multi-Attribute Decision Factors for a Modified All-or-Nothing Traffic Assignment
ISPRS Int. J. Geo-Inf. 2015, 4(2), 883-899; doi:10.3390/ijgi4020883
Received: 23 October 2014 / Revised: 2 May 2015 / Accepted: 12 May 2015 / Published: 21 May 2015
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (18310 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
To elucidate a realistic traffic assignment scenario, a multi-criterion decision system is essential. A traffic assignment model designed to simulate real-life situation may therefore utilize absolute and/or relative impedance. Ideally, the decision-making process should identify a set of traffic impedances (factors working against
[...] Read more.
To elucidate a realistic traffic assignment scenario, a multi-criterion decision system is essential. A traffic assignment model designed to simulate real-life situation may therefore utilize absolute and/or relative impedance. Ideally, the decision-making process should identify a set of traffic impedances (factors working against the smooth flow of traffic) along with pertinent parameters in order for the decision system to select the most optimal or the least-impeded route. In this study, we developed geospatial algorithms that consider multiple impedances. The impedances utilized in this study included, traffic patterns, capacity and congestion. The attributes of the decision-making process also prioritize multi-traffic scenarios by adopting first-in-first-out prioritization method. We also further subdivided classical impedance into either relative impedance or absolute impedance. The main advantage of this innovative multi-attribute, impedance-based trip assignment model is that it can be implemented in a manner of algebraic approach to utilize shortest path algorithm embedded in a Geographic Information Systems (GIS)—Graphical User Interface tool. Thus, the GIS package can therefore handle the multi-attribute impedance effectively. Furthermore, the method utilized in this paper displays flexibility and better adaptation to a multi-modal transportation system. Transportation, logistics, and random events, such as terrorism, can be easily analyzed with pertinent impedance. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue GIS for Sustainable Urban Transport)
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Open AccessArticle Characterization of Black Spot Zones for Vulnerable Road Users in São Paulo (Brazil) and Rome (Italy)
ISPRS Int. J. Geo-Inf. 2015, 4(2), 858-882; doi:10.3390/ijgi4020858
Received: 30 October 2014 / Accepted: 8 May 2015 / Published: 20 May 2015
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (14866 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Non-motorized transportation modes, especially cycling and walking, offer numerous benefits, including improvements in the livability of cities, healthy physical activity, efficient urban transportation systems, less traffic congestion, less noise pollution, clean air, less impact on climate change and decreases in the incidence of
[...] Read more.
Non-motorized transportation modes, especially cycling and walking, offer numerous benefits, including improvements in the livability of cities, healthy physical activity, efficient urban transportation systems, less traffic congestion, less noise pollution, clean air, less impact on climate change and decreases in the incidence of diseases related to vehicular emissions. Considering the substantial number of short-distance trips, the time consumed in traffic jams, the higher costs for parking vehicles and restrictions in central business districts, many commuters have found that non-motorized modes of transportation serve as viable and economical transport alternatives. Thus, local governments should encourage and stimulate non-motorized modes of transportation. In return, governments must provide safe conditions for these forms of transportation, and motorized vehicle users must respect and coexist with pedestrians and cyclists, which are the most vulnerable users of the transportation system. Although current trends in sustainable transport aim to encourage and stimulate non-motorized modes of transportation that are socially more efficient than motorized transportation, few to no safety policies have been implemented regarding vulnerable road users (VRU), mainly in large urban centers. Due to the spatial nature of the data used in transport-related studies, geospatial technologies provide a powerful analytical method for studying VRU safety frameworks through the use of spatial analysis. In this article, spatial analysis is used to determine the locations of regions that are characterized by a concentration of traffic accidents (black zones) involving VRU (injuries and casualties) in São Paulo, Brazil (developing country), and Rome, Italy (developed country). The black zones are investigated to obtain spatial patterns that can cause multiple accidents. A method based on kernel density estimation (KDE) is used to compare the two cities and show economic, social, cultural, demographic and geographic differences and/or similarities and how these factors are linked to the locations of VRU traffic accidents. Multivariate regression analyses (ordinary least squares (OLS) models and spatial regression models) are performed to investigate spatial correlations, to understand the dynamics of VRU road accidents in São Paulo and Rome and to detect factors (variables) that contribute to the occurrences of these events, such as the presence of trip generator hubs (TGH), the number of generated urban trips and demographic data. The adopted methodology presents satisfactory results for identifying and delimiting black spots and establishing a link between VRU traffic accident rates and TGH (hospitals, universities and retail shopping centers) and demographic and transport-related data. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue GIS for Sustainable Urban Transport)
Open AccessArticle Conceptual Issues Regarding the Development of Underground Railway Laser Scanning Systems
ISPRS Int. J. Geo-Inf. 2015, 4(1), 185-198; doi:10.3390/ijgi4010185
Received: 19 August 2014 / Revised: 14 November 2014 / Accepted: 16 January 2015 / Published: 27 January 2015
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (1261 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Mobile Laser Scanning (MLS) systems are widely applied for spatial data collection and support applications in many aspects. In recent years, MLS technology had been introduced to railway applications and greatly enhanced the spatial detail and efficiency when compared to traditional approaches. However,
[...] Read more.
Mobile Laser Scanning (MLS) systems are widely applied for spatial data collection and support applications in many aspects. In recent years, MLS technology had been introduced to railway applications and greatly enhanced the spatial detail and efficiency when compared to traditional approaches. However, the advance of MLS technology is not completely applied to railway environment. Typical MLS systems rely on integrated navigation through the use of Inertial Navigation Systems (INS) and Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) for geo-referencing, while operation under long-term GNSS outages or even GNSS-free environments, such as underground railway or long tunnels, remains a challenging issue due to the degraded operation of standalone inertial navigation. Commercial MLS systems usually employ high performance inertial measurement units (IMU) and various strategies to manage GNSS outages, but GNSS components are still necessary prior to and after experiencing the loss of GNSS signals. To tackle the problem of permanent GNSS outages, alternative methods are introduced to replace the GNSS and so allow the use of MLS systems in GNSS-free underground railway environments. Such approaches encourage the MLS systems to be developed into the Underground Railway Laser Scanning (URLS) systems, which may provide several alternative operational functions for the management of underground railway operation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue GIS for Sustainable Urban Transport)
Open AccessArticle Transport Accessibility Analysis Using GIS: Assessing Sustainable Transport in London
ISPRS Int. J. Geo-Inf. 2015, 4(1), 124-149; doi:10.3390/ijgi4010124
Received: 30 October 2014 / Accepted: 9 January 2015 / Published: 20 January 2015
Cited by 10 | PDF Full-text (2453 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Transport accessibility is an important driver of urban growth and key to the sustainable development of cities. This paper presents a simple GIS-based tool developed to allow the rapid analysis of accessibility by different transport modes. Designed to be flexible and use publicly-available
[...] Read more.
Transport accessibility is an important driver of urban growth and key to the sustainable development of cities. This paper presents a simple GIS-based tool developed to allow the rapid analysis of accessibility by different transport modes. Designed to be flexible and use publicly-available data, this tool (built in ArcGIS) uses generalized cost to measure transport costs across networks including monetary and distance components. The utility of the tool is demonstrated on London, UK, showing the differing patterns of accessibility across the city by different modes. It is shown that these patterns can be examined spatially, by accessibility to particular destinations (e.g., employment locations), or as a global measure across a whole city system. A number of future infrastructure scenarios are tested, examining the potential for increasing the use of low-carbon forms of transport. It is shown that private car journeys are still the least cost mode choice in London, but that infrastructure investments can play a part in reducing the cost of more sustainable transport options. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue GIS for Sustainable Urban Transport)
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Open AccessArticle GIS-Based Analytical Tools for Transport Planning: Spatial Regression Models for Transportation Demand Forecast
ISPRS Int. J. Geo-Inf. 2014, 3(2), 565-583; doi:10.3390/ijgi3020565
Received: 2 January 2014 / Revised: 20 March 2014 / Accepted: 25 March 2014 / Published: 15 April 2014
Cited by 6 | PDF Full-text (1105 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Considering the importance of spatial issues in transport planning, the main objective of this study was to analyze the results obtained from different approaches of spatial regression models. In the case of spatial autocorrelation, spatial dependence patterns should be incorporated in the models,
[...] Read more.
Considering the importance of spatial issues in transport planning, the main objective of this study was to analyze the results obtained from different approaches of spatial regression models. In the case of spatial autocorrelation, spatial dependence patterns should be incorporated in the models, since that dependence may affect the predictive power of these models. The results obtained with the spatial regression models were also compared with the results of a multiple linear regression model that is typically used in trips generation estimations. The findings support the hypothesis that the inclusion of spatial effects in regression models is important, since the best results were obtained with alternative models (spatial regression models or the ones with spatial variables included). This was observed in a case study carried out in the city of Porto Alegre, in the state of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil, in the stages of specification and calibration of the models, with two distinct datasets. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue GIS for Sustainable Urban Transport)
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Open AccessArticle A Hierarchical Approach to Optimizing Bus Stop Distribution in Large and Fast Developing Cities
ISPRS Int. J. Geo-Inf. 2014, 3(2), 554-564; doi:10.3390/ijgi3020554
Received: 19 February 2014 / Revised: 31 March 2014 / Accepted: 3 April 2014 / Published: 14 April 2014
Cited by 4 | PDF Full-text (672 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Public transit plays a key role in shaping the transportation structure of large and fast growing cities. To cope with high population and employment density, such cities usually resort to multi-modal transit services, such as rail, BRT and bus. These modes are strategically
[...] Read more.
Public transit plays a key role in shaping the transportation structure of large and fast growing cities. To cope with high population and employment density, such cities usually resort to multi-modal transit services, such as rail, BRT and bus. These modes are strategically connected to form an effective transit network. Among the transit modes, bus stops need to be properly deployed to maintain an acceptable walking accessibility. This paper presents a hierarchical process for optimizing bus stop locations in the context of fast growing multi-modal transit services. Three types of bus stops are identified hierarchically, which includes connection stops, key stops and ordinary stops. Connection stops are generated manually to connect with other transit facilities. Key stops and ordinary stops are optimized with coverage models that are respectively weighted by network centrality measure and potential demand. A case study in a Chinese city suggests the hierarchical approach may generate more effective stop distribution. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue GIS for Sustainable Urban Transport)

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