Special Issue "Coating Deposition and Surface Functionalization of Implants for Biomedical Applications 2014"

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A special issue of Journal of Functional Biomaterials (ISSN 2079-4983).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (15 April 2015)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Dr. Antonella Sola

Dipartimento di Ingegneria Enzo Ferrari, Universita' di Modena e Reggio Emilia, Via Pietro Vivarelli, 10/1 (MO-26), 41125 Modena, Italy
Website | E-Mail
Fax: +39 059 2056243
Interests: biomaterials; bioceramics; bioactive glasses; bioactive coatings; porous materials; scaffolds; glasses; ceramics; composite materials; functional coatings; sintering and thermal treatments

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The human body is able to promote spontaneous healing phenomena to face the adverse consequences of diseases, aging processes or traumatic events. However such natural reactions are not always sufficient to recover extensive functional losses and, in that case, medical or surgical interventions are required. For this reason, the demand for new biomaterials to support or restore the role of damaged tissues is a major clinical and socioeconomic need. The deposition of a proper coating or the chemicophysical treatment of the surface may boost the performance of implant devices, conveying site-specific properties to the substrate material. The apposition of glass-based glazes which resemble the original enamel of tooth, the chemical modification of titanium to activate the bone-bonding ability or the deposition of calcium-phosphate layers on metal substrates to elicit the surface development of hydroxyapatite a re just a few examples of the new approaches to improve the behaviour of medical grafts by means of biocoatings and surface functionalization methods.

Dr. Antonella Sola
Guest Editor

Submission

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. Papers will be published continuously (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are refereed through a peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Journal of Functional Biomaterials is an international peer-reviewed Open Access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 300 CHF (Swiss Francs). English correction and/or formatting fees of 250 CHF (Swiss Francs) will be charged in certain cases for those articles accepted for publication that require extensive additional formatting and/or English corrections.


Keywords

  • biocoatings
  • functionalization
  • surface treatments
  • coating deposition methods
  • implant materials

Related Special Issue

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle Fabrication and Characterization of Nanoporous Niobia, and Nanotubular Tantala, Titania and Zirconia via Anodization
J. Funct. Biomater. 2015, 6(2), 153-170; doi:10.3390/jfb6020153
Received: 19 December 2014 / Revised: 19 March 2015 / Accepted: 24 March 2015 / Published: 31 March 2015
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (9221 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Valve metals such as titanium (Ti), zirconium (Zr), niobium (Nb) and tantalum (Ta) that confer a stable oxide layer on their surfaces are commonly used as implant materials or alloying elements for titanium-based implants, due to their exceptional high corrosion resistance and excellent
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Valve metals such as titanium (Ti), zirconium (Zr), niobium (Nb) and tantalum (Ta) that confer a stable oxide layer on their surfaces are commonly used as implant materials or alloying elements for titanium-based implants, due to their exceptional high corrosion resistance and excellent biocompatibility. The aim of this study was to investigate the bioactivity of the nanostructures of tantala (Ta2O5), niobia (Nb2O5), zirconia (ZrO2) and titania (TiO2) in accordance to their roughness and wettability. Therefore, four kinds of metal oxide nanoporous and nanotubular Ta2O5, Nb2O5, ZrO2 and TiO2 were fabricated via anodization. The nanosize distribution, morphology and the physical and chemical properties of the nanolayers and their surface energies and bioactivities were investigated using SEM-EDS, X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis and 3D profilometer. It was found that the nanoporous Ta2O5 exhibited an irregular porous structure, high roughness and high surface energy as compared to bare tantalum metal; and exhibited the most superior bioactivity after annealing among the four kinds of nanoporous structures. The nanoporous Nb2O5 showed a uniform porous structure and low roughness, but no bioactivity before annealing. Overall, the nanoporous and nanotubular layers of Ta2O5, Nb2O5, ZrO2 and TiO2 demonstrated promising potential for enhanced bioactivity to improve their biomedical application alone or to improve the usage in other biocompatible metal implants. Full article
Figures

Open AccessArticle A Novel Multi-Phosphonate Surface Treatment of Titanium Dental Implants: A Study in Sheep
J. Funct. Biomater. 2014, 5(3), 135-157; doi:10.3390/jfb5030135
Received: 10 July 2014 / Revised: 20 August 2014 / Accepted: 2 September 2014 / Published: 11 September 2014
Cited by 4 | PDF Full-text (15536 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The aim of the present study was to evaluate a new multi-phosphonate surface treatment (SurfLink®) in an unloaded sheep model. Treated implants were compared to control implants in terms of bone to implant contact (BIC), bone formation, and biomechanical stability. The
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The aim of the present study was to evaluate a new multi-phosphonate surface treatment (SurfLink®) in an unloaded sheep model. Treated implants were compared to control implants in terms of bone to implant contact (BIC), bone formation, and biomechanical stability. The study used two types of implants (rough or machined surface finish) each with either the multi-phosphonate Wet or Dry treatment or no treatment (control) for a total of six groups. Animals were sacrificed after 2, 8, and 52 weeks. No adverse events were observed at any time point. At two weeks, removal torque showed significantly higher values for the multi-phosphonate treated rough surface (+32% and +29%, Dry and Wet, respectively) compared to rough control. At 52 weeks, a significantly higher removal torque was observed for the multi-phosphonate treated machined surfaces (+37% and 23%, Dry and Wet, respectively). The multi-phosphonate treated groups showed a positive tendency for higher BIC with time and increased new-old bone ratio at eight weeks. SEM images revealed greater amounts of organic materials on the multi-phosphonate treated compared to control implants, with the bone fracture (from the torque test) appearing within the bone rather than at the bone to implant interface as it occurred for control implants. Full article
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Open AccessArticle Increase of Compact Bone Thickness in Rat Tibia after Implanting MgO into the Bone Marrow Cavity
J. Funct. Biomater. 2014, 5(3), 158-166; doi:10.3390/jfb5030158
Received: 7 July 2014 / Revised: 13 August 2014 / Accepted: 4 September 2014 / Published: 11 September 2014
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (602 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The effect of implanting MgO paste into the bone marrow of rat tibia, was studied by light microscopy, time of flight-secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS), and environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM), and energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) analysis. After three weeks of implantation, the
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The effect of implanting MgO paste into the bone marrow of rat tibia, was studied by light microscopy, time of flight-secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS), and environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM), and energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) analysis. After three weeks of implantation, the thickness of compact bone increased by 25% compared to sham-operated controls, while no effect was seen on the trabecular bone. In order to further elucidate the mechanism of the Mg-induced increase in bone mass, EDX and ToF-SIMS analysis of the bone samples was made at two weeks. At this time-point, no detectable difference in the thickness of the compact bone in Mg-treated and non-treated animals was observed. The Mg-content of the bone marrow and bone tissue of the Mg-exposed animals did not differ from that of sham-operated controls, implying that there are no traces of the implanted MgO when the mass of compact bone increases, between two and three weeks after surgery. The ratio of Mg/Ca content was higher in the bone of Mg-treated animals, indicating an altered structure of the bone mineral, which was confirmed by the ToF-SIMS analysis, showing increased levels of MgCO3, phosphate ions and CaF in the bone of MgO-exposed animals. Possible cellular activities behind the effect of MgO on compact bone thickness are discussed. Full article

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