Special Issue "Recent Advances in Personalized Medicine"

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A special issue of Journal of Personalized Medicine (ISSN 2075-4426).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 October 2011)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Urs A. Meyer

Biozentrum-Pharmazentrum, University of Basel, Klingelbergstrasse 50/70, CH-4056 Basel, Switzerland
Website | E-Mail
Phone: +41 43 535 9049
Fax: +41 61 43 535 9049
Interests: genomic medicine; pharmacogenomics; drug disposition; host and environmental factors influencing therapeutic response; personalized medicine

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

To establish Journal of Personalized Medicine as a journal with high standards that attracts top quality research, the first issue published in this journal is of upmost importance. We plan to publish a collection of papers that nicely demonstrate the broadness of the field and in this way underscore the focus and scope of the journal. We invite you to suggest a title that highlights the personalized medicine aspects of your field of research.

Prof. Dr. Urs A. Meyer
Editor-in-Chief

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessCommunication Developing Drugs for Children and the Adjustment of Medication—Is It a New Challenge or an Adaptation of Past Ideas?
J. Pers. Med. 2011, 1(1), 5-16; doi:10.3390/jpm1010005
Received: 26 October 2011 / Revised: 21 November 2011 / Accepted: 23 November 2011 / Published: 6 December 2011
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (1161 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Nowadays the adjustment of medication for each patient is at the center of health strategy. Children can be considered as specific targets with their own specificities. In the oral route field some examples of drugs especially adapted to children can be found. Design
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Nowadays the adjustment of medication for each patient is at the center of health strategy. Children can be considered as specific targets with their own specificities. In the oral route field some examples of drugs especially adapted to children can be found. Design is introduced in drug formulation to offer a better choice of products and now, children can be considered as partners in their own treatment. Enhanced comprehension of children's requirements can also lead to creation of drugs that improve compliance. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Advances in Personalized Medicine)

Review

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Open AccessReview Infectious Disease Management through Point-of-Care Personalized Medicine Molecular Diagnostic Technologies
J. Pers. Med. 2012, 2(2), 50-70; doi:10.3390/jpm2020050
Received: 12 March 2012 / Revised: 13 April 2012 / Accepted: 28 April 2012 / Published: 2 May 2012
Cited by 14 | PDF Full-text (236 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Infectious disease management essentially consists in identifying the microbial cause(s) of an infection, initiating if necessary antimicrobial therapy against microbes, and controlling host reactions to infection. In clinical microbiology, the turnaround time of the diagnostic cycle (>24 hours) often leads to unnecessary suffering
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Infectious disease management essentially consists in identifying the microbial cause(s) of an infection, initiating if necessary antimicrobial therapy against microbes, and controlling host reactions to infection. In clinical microbiology, the turnaround time of the diagnostic cycle (>24 hours) often leads to unnecessary suffering and deaths; approaches to relieve this burden include rapid diagnostic procedures and more efficient transmission or interpretation of molecular microbiology results. Although rapid nucleic acid-based diagnostic testing has demonstrated that it can impact on the transmission of hospital-acquired infections, we believe that such life-saving procedures should be performed closer to the patient, in dedicated 24/7 laboratories of healthcare institutions, or ideally at point of care. While personalized medicine generally aims at interrogating the genomic information of a patient, drug metabolism polymorphisms, for example, to guide drug choice and dosage, personalized medicine concepts are applicable in infectious diseases for the (rapid) identification of a disease-causing microbe and determination of its antimicrobial resistance profile, to guide an appropriate antimicrobial treatment for the proper management of the patient. The implementation of point-of-care testing for infectious diseases will require acceptance by medical authorities, new technological and communication platforms, as well as reimbursement practices such that time- and life-saving procedures become available to the largest number of patients. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Advances in Personalized Medicine)
Open AccessReview Molecular Therapeutic Advances in Personalized Therapy of Melanoma and Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer
J. Pers. Med. 2012, 2(2), 35-49; doi:10.3390/jpm2020035
Received: 1 March 2012 / Revised: 25 March 2012 / Accepted: 3 April 2012 / Published: 10 April 2012
Cited by 3 | PDF Full-text (295 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The incorporation of individualized molecular therapeutics into routine clinical practice for both non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and melanoma are amongst the most significant advances of the last decades in medical oncology. In NSCLC activating somatic mutations in exons encoding the tyrosine kinase
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The incorporation of individualized molecular therapeutics into routine clinical practice for both non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and melanoma are amongst the most significant advances of the last decades in medical oncology. In NSCLC activating somatic mutations in exons encoding the tyrosine kinase domain of the Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR) gene have been found to be predictive of a response to treatment with tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI), erlotinib or gefitinib. More recently the EML4-ALK fusion gene which occurs in 3–5% of NSCLC has been found to predict sensitivity to crizotinib an inhibitor of the anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) receptor tyrosine kinase. Similarly in melanoma, 50% of cases have BRAF mutations in exon 15 mostly V600E and these cases are sensitive to the BRAF inhibitors vemurafenib or dabrafenib. In a Phase III study of advanced melanoma cases with this mutation vemurafenib improved survival from 64% to 84% at 6 months, when compared with dacarbazine. In both NSCLC and melanoma clinical benefit is not obtained in patients without these genomic changes, and moreover in the case of vemurafenib the therapy may theoretically induce proliferation of cases of melanoma without BRAF mutations. An emerging clinical challenge is that of acquired resistance after initial responses to targeted therapeutics. Resistance to the TKI’s in NSCLC is most frequently due to acquisition of secondary mutations within the tyrosine kinase of the EGFR or alternatively activation of alternative tyrosine kinases such as C-MET. Mechanisms of drug resistance in melanoma to vemurafenib do not involve mutations in BRAF itself but are associated with a variety of molecular changes including RAF1 or COT gene over expression, activating mutations in RAS or increased activation of the receptor tyrosine kinase PDGFRβ. Importantly these data support introducing re-biopsy of tumors at progression to continue to personalize the choice of therapy throughout the patient’s disease course. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Advances in Personalized Medicine)
Open AccessReview Personalized Medicine and Cancer
J. Pers. Med. 2012, 2(1), 1-14; doi:10.3390/jpm2010001
Received: 1 January 2012 / Revised: 18 January 2012 / Accepted: 21 January 2012 / Published: 30 January 2012
Cited by 4 | PDF Full-text (181 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Cancer is one of the leading causes of death in the United States, and more than 1.5 million new cases and more than 0.5 million deaths were reported during 2010 in the United States alone. Following completion of the sequencing of the human
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Cancer is one of the leading causes of death in the United States, and more than 1.5 million new cases and more than 0.5 million deaths were reported during 2010 in the United States alone. Following completion of the sequencing of the human genome, substantial progress has been made in characterizing the human epigenome, proteome, and metabolome; a better understanding of pharmacogenomics has been developed, and the potential for customizing health care for the individual has grown tremendously. Recently, personalized medicine has mainly involved the systematic use of genetic or other information about an individual patient to select or optimize that patient’s preventative and therapeutic care. Molecular profiling in healthy and cancer patient samples may allow for a greater degree of personalized medicine than is currently available. Information about a patient’s proteinaceous, genetic, and metabolic profile could be used to tailor medical care to that individual’s needs. A key attribute of this medical model is the development of companion diagnostics, whereby molecular assays that measure levels of proteins, genes, or specific mutations are used to provide a specific therapy for an individual’s condition by stratifying disease status, selecting the proper medication, and tailoring dosages to that patient’s specific needs. Additionally, such methods can be used to assess a patient’s risk factors for a number of conditions and to tailor individual preventative treatments. Recent advances, challenges, and future perspectives of personalized medicine in cancer are discussed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Advances in Personalized Medicine)

Other

Jump to: Research, Review

Open AccessOpinion Trends in Personalized Therapies in Oncology: The (Venture) Capitalist’s Perspective
J. Pers. Med. 2012, 2(1), 15-34; doi:10.3390/jpm2010015
Received: 9 February 2012 / Revised: 22 February 2012 / Accepted: 29 February 2012 / Published: 7 March 2012
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (323 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Oncology is one of the most important fields of personalized medicine as a majority of efforts in this field have recently centered on targeted cancer drug development. New tools are continuously being developed that promise to make cancer treatment more efficacious while causing
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Oncology is one of the most important fields of personalized medicine as a majority of efforts in this field have recently centered on targeted cancer drug development. New tools are continuously being developed that promise to make cancer treatment more efficacious while causing fewer side effects. Like most industries, the biopharmaceutical industry is also following certain global trends and these are analyzed in this article. As academia and industry are mutually dependent on each other, researchers in the field should be aware of those trends and the immediate consequences for their research. It is important for the future of this field that there is a healthy relationship among all interested parties as the challenges of personalized medicine are becoming ever more complex. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Advances in Personalized Medicine)

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