E-Mail Alert

Add your e-mail address to receive forthcoming issues of this journal:

Journal Browser

Journal Browser

Special Issue "Novel Stimuli-Responsive (co)Polymers"

Quicklinks

A special issue of Polymers (ISSN 2073-4360).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 May 2010)

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Dr. Wei Min Huang

School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 50 Nanyang Avenue, 639798 Singapore
Website | E-Mail
Interests: shape-memory polymers; shape memory hybrids; shape-memory composites; conductive polymers; polymer nanocomposites
Guest Editor
Dr. Richard Fu

Department of Mechanical Engineering, School of Engineering and Physical Sciences, Heriot-Watt University, Edinburgh, EH14 4AS UK
E-Mail

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Due to their unique “switchable” properties, stimuli-responsive polymers have been attracting considerable attention in chemistry, chemical engineering, environment, textile, and biotechnology. In recent years, significant progresses in the stimuli-responsive polymers have been witnessed and successful applications have already been demonstrated in actuators, sensors, intelligent textiles, bio-separation and drug delivery systems. The stimuli have greatly expanded from traditional thermo-responsive to photo-responsive, chemo-responsive, etc. This is largely driven by the increasing demanding from numerous real applications, in particular in biomedical related ones, such as drug delivery and medical devices in the minimally invasive surgery.
This special issue, entitled “Novel Stimuli-Responsive (co)Polymers”, aims to provide a channel to timely showcase the recent development in material science, processing and technologies, as well as applications within this exciting field. In addition, review papers are welcome to feature the progress in a particular area.

Dr. Richard Fu
Dr. Wei Min Huang
Guest Editors

Keywords

  • stimulus-responsive
  • (co)polymers
  • smart polymers
  • shape memory polymers
  • piezoelectric polymers
  • sensors
  • actuators

Published Papers (6 papers)

View options order results:
result details:
Displaying articles 1-6
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Review

Open AccessArticle Temperature Induced Solubility Transitions of Various Poly(2-oxazoline)s in Ethanol-Water Solvent Mixtures
Polymers 2010, 2(3), 188-199; doi:10.3390/polym2030188
Received: 13 June 2010 / Revised: 3 August 2010 / Accepted: 6 August 2010 / Published: 10 August 2010
Cited by 29 | PDF Full-text (260 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The solution behavior of a series of poly(2-oxazoline)s with different side chains, namely methyl, ethyl, n-propyl, isopropyl, n-butyl, isobutyl, pentyl, hexyl, heptyl, octyl, nonyl, phenyl and benzyl, are reported in ethanol-water solvent mixtures based on turbidimetry investigations. The LCST transitions of
[...] Read more.
The solution behavior of a series of poly(2-oxazoline)s with different side chains, namely methyl, ethyl, n-propyl, isopropyl, n-butyl, isobutyl, pentyl, hexyl, heptyl, octyl, nonyl, phenyl and benzyl, are reported in ethanol-water solvent mixtures based on turbidimetry investigations. The LCST transitions of poly(2-oxazoline)s with propyl side chains and the UCST transitions of the poly(2-oxazoline)s with more hydrophobic side chains are discussed in relation to the ethanol-water solvent composition and structure. The poly(2-alkyl-2-oxazoline)s with side chains longer than propyl only dissolved during the first heating run, which is discussed and correlated to the melting transition of the polymers. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Novel Stimuli-Responsive (co)Polymers)
Figures

Open AccessArticle Thermal-Mechanical Properties of Polyurethane-Clay Shape Memory Polymer Nanocomposites
Polymers 2010, 2(2), 31-39; doi:10.3390/polym2020031
Received: 15 January 2010 / Revised: 15 April 2010 / Accepted: 22 April 2010 / Published: 26 April 2010
Cited by 9 | PDF Full-text (1644 KB)
Abstract
Shape memory nanocomposites of polyurethane (PU)-clay were fabricated by melt mixing of PU and nano-clay. Based on nano-indentation and microhardness tests, the strength of the nanocomposites increased dramatically as a function of clay content, which is attributed to the enhanced nanoclay–polymer interactions. Thermal
[...] Read more.
Shape memory nanocomposites of polyurethane (PU)-clay were fabricated by melt mixing of PU and nano-clay. Based on nano-indentation and microhardness tests, the strength of the nanocomposites increased dramatically as a function of clay content, which is attributed to the enhanced nanoclay–polymer interactions. Thermal mechanical experiments demonstrated good mechanical and shape memory effects of the nanocomposites. Full shape memory recovery was displayed by both the pure PU and PU-clay nanocomposites. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Novel Stimuli-Responsive (co)Polymers)

Review

Jump to: Research

Open AccessReview Responsive Polymers for Crop Protection
Polymers 2010, 2(3), 229-251; doi:10.3390/polym2030229
Received: 15 July 2010 / Revised: 15 August 2010 / Accepted: 18 August 2010 / Published: 19 August 2010
Cited by 18 | PDF Full-text (1119 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
This review outlines the responsive polymer methods currently in use with their potential application to plant protection and puts forward plant-specific mechanisms as stimuli in newly devised methods for smart release of crop protection agents (CPAs). CPAs include chemicals (fungicides, insecticides, herbicides), biochemicals
[...] Read more.
This review outlines the responsive polymer methods currently in use with their potential application to plant protection and puts forward plant-specific mechanisms as stimuli in newly devised methods for smart release of crop protection agents (CPAs). CPAs include chemicals (fungicides, insecticides, herbicides), biochemicals (antibiotics, RNA-based vaccines for plant viruses), semiochemicals (pheromones, repellents, allomones), microbial pesticides, growth regulators (insect and plant) or micronutrients, all with crop protection effects. This appraisal focuses on emerging uses of polymer nano-encapsulated CPAs. Firstly, the most interesting advances in controlled release methods are critically discussed with their advantages and drawbacks. Secondly, several plant-specific stimuli-based smart methods are anticipated for use alongside the polymer nano- or micro-capsules. These new CPA release methods are designed to (i) protect plants against infection produced by fungi or bacteria, and (ii) apply micro-nutrients when the plants need it the most. Thus, we foresee (i) the responsive release of nano- encapsulated bio-insecticides regulated by plant stress enzymes, and (ii) the delivery of micro-nutrients synchronized by the nature or intensity of plant root exudates. Such continued advances of nano-scale smart polymer-based CPAs for the protection of crops herald a “small revolution” for the benefit of sustainable agriculture. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Novel Stimuli-Responsive (co)Polymers)
Figures

Open AccessReview Review on the Functional Determinants and Durability of Shape Memory Polymers
Polymers 2010, 2(3), 120-158; doi:10.3390/polym2030120
Received: 1 June 2010 / Revised: 5 July 2010 / Accepted: 21 July 2010 / Published: 28 July 2010
Cited by 50 | PDF Full-text (851 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Shape memory polymers (SMP) belong to the class of stimuli-responsive materials and have generated significant research interest. Their capability to retain an imposed, temporary shape and to recover the initial, permanent shape upon exposure to an external stimulus depends on the “functional determinants”,
[...] Read more.
Shape memory polymers (SMP) belong to the class of stimuli-responsive materials and have generated significant research interest. Their capability to retain an imposed, temporary shape and to recover the initial, permanent shape upon exposure to an external stimulus depends on the “functional determinants”, which in simplistic terms, can be divided into structural/morphological and processing/environmental factors. The primary aim of the first part of this review is to reflect the knowledge about these fundamental relationships. In a next step, recent advances in shape memory polymer composites are summarized. In contrast to earlier reviews, studies on the impairment of shape memory properties through various factors, such as aging, compression and hibernation, lubricants, UV light and thermo-mechanical cycling, are extensively reviewed. Apart from summarizing the state-of-the-art in SMP research, recent progress is commented. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Novel Stimuli-Responsive (co)Polymers)
Figures

Open AccessReview Intelligent Polymeric Nanocarriers Responding to Physical or Biological Signals: A New Paradigm of Cytosolic Drug Delivery for Tumor Treatment
Polymers 2010, 2(2), 86-101; doi:10.3390/polym2020086
Received: 28 April 2010 / Revised: 2 June 2010 / Accepted: 18 June 2010 / Published: 22 June 2010
Cited by 7 | PDF Full-text (664 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The physicochemical properties of stimuli-responsive polymers change with physical or biological signals, such as pH, enzyme concentrations, and temperature. These polymers have attracted considerable attention in the field of drug delivery. The drug carrier system, which was revolutionized by the introduction of these
[...] Read more.
The physicochemical properties of stimuli-responsive polymers change with physical or biological signals, such as pH, enzyme concentrations, and temperature. These polymers have attracted considerable attention in the field of drug delivery. The drug carrier system, which was revolutionized by the introduction of these polymers, has recently provided a new paradigm of maximizing the therapeutic activity of drugs. This review highlights recent studies regarding stimuli-responsive drug carriers tailor-made for effective cytosolic drug delivery, with particular emphasis on tumor treatment. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Novel Stimuli-Responsive (co)Polymers)
Figures

Open AccessReview Hybrid Lattice Particle Modelling Approach for Polymeric Materials Subject to High Strain Rate Loads
Polymers 2010, 2(1), 3-30; doi:10.3390/polym2010003
Received: 25 February 2010 / Revised: 23 March 2010 / Accepted: 23 March 2010 / Published: 25 March 2010
Cited by 5 | PDF Full-text (1784 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Hybrid Lattice Particle modelling (HLPM) is an innovative particular dynamics approach that is established based on a combination of the particle modelling (PM) technique together with the conventional lattice modelling (LM) theory. It is developed for the purpose of simulating the dynamic fragmentation
[...] Read more.
Hybrid Lattice Particle modelling (HLPM) is an innovative particular dynamics approach that is established based on a combination of the particle modelling (PM) technique together with the conventional lattice modelling (LM) theory. It is developed for the purpose of simulating the dynamic fragmentation of solids under high strain rate loadings at macroscales with a varying Poisson's ratio. HLPM is conceptually illustrated by fully dynamic particles (or “quasi-particles”) placed at the nodes of a lattice network without explicitly considering their geometric size. The interaction potentials among the particles can employ either linear (quadratic) or nonlinear (Leonard-Jones or strain rate dependent polynomial) type as the axial/angular linkage. The defined spring constants are then mapped into lattice system, which are in turn matched with the material’s continuum-level elastic moduli, strength, Poisson's ratio and mass density. As an accurate dynamic fracture solver of materials, HLPM has its unique advantages over the other numerical techniques which are mainly characterized as easy preparation of inputs, high computation efficiency, ability of post-fracture simulation and a multiscale model, etc., This paper is to review the successful HLPM studies of dynamic fragmentation of polymeric materials with good accuracy. Polymeric materials, including nylon 6-6, vinyl ester and epoxy, are accounted for under the loading conditions of tension, indentation and punctuation. In addition, HLPM of wave propagation and wave induced fracture study is also reviewed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Novel Stimuli-Responsive (co)Polymers)

Journal Contact

MDPI AG
Polymers Editorial Office
St. Alban-Anlage 66, 4052 Basel, Switzerland
polymers@mdpi.com
Tel. +41 61 683 77 34
Fax: +41 61 302 89 18
Editorial Board
Contact Details Submit to Polymers
Back to Top