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Special Issue "Geomorphological Processes and Natural Hazards"

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A special issue of Remote Sensing (ISSN 2072-4292).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 December 2009)

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Niki Evelpidou (Website)

Faculty of Geology and Geoenvironment, Geography & Climatology Dept., Panepistimiopolis, Zografou, 15784, Athens, Greece
Fax: +30 210 7274927
Interests: remote sensing in geomorphologic processes and natural hazards
Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Andreas Vassilopoulos (Website)

Remote Sensing Group, Geo-environmental Institute, Floias 13, Maroussi, 15125 Athens, Greece
Fax: +30 10 7274297
Interests: geomorphology; geomorphological processes; natural hazards; remote sensing; GIS; mapping geomorphological processes, hazard risk mapping; hazard risk modeling, geomorphological evolution of different geormorphic environments; natural hazards evolution

Keywords

  • Geomorphology
  • Geomorphological Processes
  • Natural Hazards
  • Remote Sensing
  • GIS
  • Mapping Geomorphological Processes
  • Hazard Risk Mapping
  • Hazard Risk Modeling
  • Geomorphological Evolution of Different Geormorphic Environments
  • Natural Hazards Evolution

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle An Analysis of the Spatial Colonization of Scrubland Intrusive Species in the Itabo and Guanabo Watershed, Cuba
Remote Sens. 2010, 2(3), 740-757; doi:10.3390/rs2030740
Received: 26 January 2010 / Revised: 3 February 2010 / Accepted: 10 February 2010 / Published: 9 March 2010
PDF Full-text (2034 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
During the last twenty years, numerous agricultural and farming areas of Cuba have seen a marked increase in invading plants; among the most common species found is the Marabú (Dychrostachys cinerea) and the Aroma (Acacia farnesiana). In the [...] Read more.
During the last twenty years, numerous agricultural and farming areas of Cuba have seen a marked increase in invading plants; among the most common species found is the Marabú (Dychrostachys cinerea) and the Aroma (Acacia farnesiana). In the present study, an analysis was carried out of the expansion of these species over the last two decades, in the river basin of the Guanabo (17 km north-east of Havana). This was done by digital processing of satellite images and an analysis of the spatial and statistical data of the Geographical Information System (GIS). The zones most affected by this scrubland were mapped and a study of how natural factors may have influenced land use and the tendency of these species to increase was carried out. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Geomorphological Processes and Natural Hazards)
Open AccessArticle Photogrammetric Methodology for the Production of Geomorphologic Maps: Application to the Veleta Rock Glacier (Sierra Nevada, Granada, Spain)
Remote Sens. 2009, 1(4), 829-841; doi:10.3390/rs1040829
Received: 11 September 2009 / Revised: 25 September 2009 / Accepted: 23 October 2009 / Published: 28 October 2009
Cited by 11 | PDF Full-text (563 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
In this paper we present a stereo feature-based method using SIFT (Scale-invariant feature transform) descriptors. We use automatic feature extractors, matching algorithms between images and techniques of robust estimation to produce a DTM (Digital Terrain Model) using convergent shots of a rock [...] Read more.
In this paper we present a stereo feature-based method using SIFT (Scale-invariant feature transform) descriptors. We use automatic feature extractors, matching algorithms between images and techniques of robust estimation to produce a DTM (Digital Terrain Model) using convergent shots of a rock glacier.The geomorphologic structure observed in this study is the Veleta rock glacier (Sierra Nevada, Granada, Spain). This rock glacier is of high scientific interest because it is the southernmost active rock glacier in Europe and it has been analyzed every year since 2001. The research on the Veleta rock glacier is devoted to the study of its displacement and cartography through geodetic and photogrammetric techniques. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Geomorphological Processes and Natural Hazards)

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