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Antioxidants, Volume 5, Issue 4 (December 2016)

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Research

Jump to: Review

Open AccessArticle In Vitro Investigation of Six Antioxidants for Pig Diets
Antioxidants 2016, 5(4), 41; doi:10.3390/antiox5040041
Received: 7 August 2016 / Revised: 3 October 2016 / Accepted: 2 November 2016 / Published: 11 November 2016
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Abstract
Oxidative stress in the small intestinal epithelium can lead to barrier malfunction. In this study, the effect of rosmarinic acid (RA), quercetin (Que), gallic acid (GA), lipoic acid (LA), ethoxyquin (ETQ) and Se-methionine (SeMet) pre-treatments using 2 mM Trolox as a control on
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Oxidative stress in the small intestinal epithelium can lead to barrier malfunction. In this study, the effect of rosmarinic acid (RA), quercetin (Que), gallic acid (GA), lipoic acid (LA), ethoxyquin (ETQ) and Se-methionine (SeMet) pre-treatments using 2 mM Trolox as a control on the viability and the generation of intracellular reactive oxygen species (iROS) of oxidatively (H2O2) stressed intestinal porcine epithelial cells (IPEC-J2) was investigated. A neutral red assay showed that RA (50–400 µM), Que (12.5–200 µM), GA (50–400 µM), ETQ (6.25–100 µM), and SeMet (125–1000 µM) pre-treatments but not LA significantly increased the viability of H2O2-stressed IPEC-J2 cells (p < 0.05). A 5-(and-6)-chloromethyl-2′,7′-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate, acetyl ester (CM-H2DCFDA) fluorescent probe showed that RA (100–600 µM), Que (25–800 µM), ETQ (3.125–100 µM) and SeMet (500–2000 µM) pre-treatments significantly reduced iROS in IPEC-J2 monolayers (p < 0.05). Moreover, RA and Que were most effective in reducing iROS. Therefore, the effects of RA and Que on barrier functioning in vitro were examined. RA and Que pre-treatments significantly decreased fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-conjugated dextran-4 (4 kDa) permeability and transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER) of an IPEC-J2 cell monolayer (p < 0.05). These in vitro results of RA and Que hold promise for their use as antioxidants in pig feed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Lipid Oxidation in Meat and Poultry)
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Open AccessArticle Tart Cherry Extracts Reduce Inflammatory and Oxidative Stress Signaling in Microglial Cells
Antioxidants 2016, 5(4), 33; doi:10.3390/antiox5040033
Received: 7 July 2016 / Revised: 2 September 2016 / Accepted: 9 September 2016 / Published: 22 September 2016
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Abstract
Tart cherries contain an array of polyphenols that can decrease inflammation and oxidative stress (OS), which contribute to cognitive declines seen in aging populations. Previous studies have shown that polyphenols from dark-colored fruits can reduce stress-mediated signaling in BV-2 mouse microglial cells, leading
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Tart cherries contain an array of polyphenols that can decrease inflammation and oxidative stress (OS), which contribute to cognitive declines seen in aging populations. Previous studies have shown that polyphenols from dark-colored fruits can reduce stress-mediated signaling in BV-2 mouse microglial cells, leading to decreases in nitric oxide (NO) production and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression. Thus, the present study sought to determine if tart cherries—which improved cognitive behavior in aged rats—would be efficacious in reducing inflammatory and OS signaling in HAPI rat microglial cells. Cells were pretreated with different concentrations (0–1.0 mg/mL) of Montmorency tart cherry powder for 1–4 h, then treated with 0 or 100 ng/mL lipopolysaccharide (LPS) overnight. LPS application increased extracellular levels of NO and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), and intracellular levels of iNOS and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2). Pretreatment with tart cherry decreased levels of NO, TNF-α, and COX-2 in a dose- and time-dependent manner versus those without pretreatment; the optimal combination was between 0.125 and 0.25 mg/mL tart cherry for 2 h. Higher concentrations of tart cherry powder and longer exposure times negatively affected cell viability. Therefore, tart cherries (like other dark-colored fruits), may be effective in reducing inflammatory and OS-mediated signals. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Berry Antioxidants in Health and Disease) Electronic Edition available
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Open AccessArticle Blueberry Consumption Affects Serum Uric Acid Concentrations in Older Adults in a Sex-Specific Manner
Antioxidants 2016, 5(4), 43; doi:10.3390/antiox5040043
Received: 1 August 2016 / Revised: 31 October 2016 / Accepted: 18 November 2016 / Published: 29 November 2016
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Abstract
Blueberries are rich in antioxidants and may protect against disease. Uric acid accounts for about 50% of the antioxidant properties in humans. Elevated levels of serum uric acid (SUA) or hyperuricemia is a risk factor for cardiovascular disease (CVD). The aim was to
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Blueberries are rich in antioxidants and may protect against disease. Uric acid accounts for about 50% of the antioxidant properties in humans. Elevated levels of serum uric acid (SUA) or hyperuricemia is a risk factor for cardiovascular disease (CVD). The aim was to determine the effect of blueberries on SUA in older adults. Participants (n = 133, 65–80 years) experiencing mild cognitive impairment (MCI) were randomized in a double-blind 6-month clinical trial to either blueberry or placebo. A reference group with no MCI received no treatment. The mean (SD) SUA at baseline were 5.45 (0.9), 6.4 (1.3) and 5.8 (1.4) mg/dL in reference, placebo, and treatment groups, respectively. Baseline SUA was different in men and women (6.25 (1.1) vs. 5.35 (1.1), p = 0.001). During the first three months, SUA decreased in the blueberry group and was significantly different from the placebo group in both men and women (p < 0.0003). Sex-specific differences became apparent after 3 months, when only men showed an increase in SUA in the blueberry group and not in the placebo (p = 0.0006) between 3 and 6 months. At 6 months SUA had rebounded in both men and women and returned to baseline levels. Baseline SUA was correlated with CVD risk factors, waist circumference and triglycerides (p < 0.05), but differed by sex. Overall, 6 m SUA changes were negatively associated with triglycerides in men, but not in women. Group-wise association between 6 m SUA changes and CVD risk factors showed associations with diastolic blood pressure, triglycerides and high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol in women of the Blueberry group but not in men or any sex in the placebo group. In summary, blueberries may affect SUA and its relationship with CVD risk in a sex-specific manner. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Berry Antioxidants in Health and Disease) Electronic Edition available
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Open AccessArticle Characterization of Chemical Compounds with Antioxidant and Cytotoxic Activities in Bougainvillea x buttiana Holttum and Standl, (var. Rose) Extracts
Antioxidants 2016, 5(4), 45; doi:10.3390/antiox5040045
Received: 13 November 2016 / Revised: 27 November 2016 / Accepted: 30 November 2016 / Published: 2 December 2016
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Abstract
Bougainvillea is widely used in traditional Mexican medicine to treat several diseases. This study was designed to characterize the chemical constituents of B. x buttiana extracts with antioxidant and cytotoxic activities using different solvents. The extraction solvents used were as follows: distilled water
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Bougainvillea is widely used in traditional Mexican medicine to treat several diseases. This study was designed to characterize the chemical constituents of B. x buttiana extracts with antioxidant and cytotoxic activities using different solvents. The extraction solvents used were as follows: distilled water (dH2O), methanol (MeOH), acetone (DMK), ethanol (EtOH), ethyl acetate (EtOAc), dichloromethane (DCM), and hexane (Hex) (100%) at an extraction temperature of 26 °C. Analysis of bioactive compounds present in the B. x buttiana extracts included the application of common phytochemical screening assays, GC-MS analysis, and cytotoxicity and antioxidant assays. The results show that the highest extraction yield was observed with water and methanol. The maximum total phenolic content amount and highest antioxidant potential were obtained when extraction with methanol was used. With the exceptions of water and ethanol extractions, all other extracts showed cytotoxicity ranging between 31% and 50%. The prevailing compounds in water, methanol, ethanol, and acetone solvents were as follows: 4H-pyran-4-one, 2,3-dihydro-3, 5-dihydroxy-6-methyl (2), 2-propenoic acid, 3-(2-hydrophenyl)-(E)- (3), and 3-O-methyl-d-glucose (6). By contrast, the major components in the experiments using solvents such as EtOH, DMK, EtOAc, DCM, and Hex were n-hexadecanoic acid (8), 9,12-octadecadienoic acid (Z,Z) (12); 9-octadecenoic acid (E)- (13), and stigmasta-5,22-dien-3-ol (28). Full article
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Open AccessArticle Anthocyanin Accumulation in Muscadine Berry Skins Is Influenced by the Expression of the MYB Transcription Factors, MybA1, and MYBCS1
Antioxidants 2016, 5(4), 35; doi:10.3390/antiox5040035
Received: 16 April 2016 / Revised: 13 August 2016 / Accepted: 18 September 2016 / Published: 12 October 2016
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Abstract
The skin color of grape berry is very important in the wine industry. The red color results from the synthesis and accumulation of anthocyanins, which is regulated by transcription factors belonging to the MYB family. The transcription factors that activate the anthocyanin biosynthetic
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The skin color of grape berry is very important in the wine industry. The red color results from the synthesis and accumulation of anthocyanins, which is regulated by transcription factors belonging to the MYB family. The transcription factors that activate the anthocyanin biosynthetic genes have been isolated in model plants. However, the genetic basis of color variation is species-specific and its understanding is relevant in many crop species. This study reports the isolation of MybA1, and MYBCS-1 genes from muscadine grapes for the first time. They are designated as VrMybA1 (GenBank Accession No. KJ513437), and VrMYBCS1 (VrMYB5a) (GenBank Accession No. KJ513438). The findings in this study indicate that, the deduced VrMybA1 and VrMYBCS1 protein structures share extensive sequence similarity with previously characterized plant MYBs, while phylogenetic analysis confirms that they are members of the plant MYB super-family. The expressions of MybA1, and MYBCS1 (VrMYB5a) gene sequences were investigated by quantitative real-time PCR using in vitro cell cultures, and berry skin samples at different developmental stages. Results showed that MybA1, and MYBCS1 genes were up-regulated in the veràison and physiologically mature red berry skins during fruit development, as well as in in vitro red cell cultures. This study also found that in ripening berries, the transcription of VrMybA1, and VrMYBCS1 in the berry skin was positively correlated with anthocyanin accumulation. Therefore, the upregulation of VrMybA1, and VrMYBCS1 results in the accumulation and regulation of anthocyanin biosynthesis in berry development of muscadine grapes. This work greatly enhances the understanding of anthocyanin biosynthesis in muscadine grapes and will facilitate future genetic modification of the antioxidants in V. rotundifolia. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Berry Antioxidants in Health and Disease) Electronic Edition available
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Open AccessArticle Chemical Analysis of Extracts from Newfoundland Berries and Potential Neuroprotective Effects
Antioxidants 2016, 5(4), 36; doi:10.3390/antiox5040036
Received: 15 July 2016 / Revised: 23 September 2016 / Accepted: 8 October 2016 / Published: 19 October 2016
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Abstract
Various species of berries have been reported to contain several polyphenolic compounds, such as anthocyanins and flavonols, which are known to possess high antioxidant activity and may be beneficial for human health. To our knowledge, a thorough chemical analysis of polyphenolics in species
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Various species of berries have been reported to contain several polyphenolic compounds, such as anthocyanins and flavonols, which are known to possess high antioxidant activity and may be beneficial for human health. To our knowledge, a thorough chemical analysis of polyphenolics in species of these plants native to Newfoundland, Canada has not been conducted. The primary objective of this study was to determine the polyphenolic compounds present in commercial extracts from Newfoundland berries, which included blueberries (V. angustifolium), lingonberries (V. vitis-idaea) and black currant (Ribes lacustre). Anthocyanin and flavonol glycosides in powdered extracts from Ribes lacustre and the Vaccinium species were identified using the high performance liquid chromatographic (HPLC) separation method with mass spectrometric (MS) detection. The identified compounds were extracted from dried berries by various solvents via ultrasonication followed by centrifugation. A reverse-phase analytical column was employed to identify the retention time of each chemical component before submission for LC–MS analysis. A total of 21 phenolic compounds were tentatively identified in the three species. Further, we tested the effects of the lingonberry extract for its ability to protect neurons and glia from trauma utilizing an in vitro model of cell injury. Surprisingly, these extracts provided complete protection from cell death in this model. These findings indicate the presence of a wide variety of anthocyanins and flavonols in berries that grow natively in Newfoundland. These powdered extracts maintain these compounds intact despite being processed from berry fruit, indicating their potential use as dietary supplements. In addition, these recent findings and previous data from our lab demonstrate the ability of compounds in berries to protect the nervous system from traumatic insults. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Berry Antioxidants in Health and Disease) Electronic Edition available
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Open AccessArticle The Effects of Different Garlic-Derived Allyl Sulfides on Anaerobic Sulfur Metabolism in the Mouse Kidney
Antioxidants 2016, 5(4), 46; doi:10.3390/antiox5040046
Received: 5 September 2016 / Revised: 3 November 2016 / Accepted: 22 November 2016 / Published: 5 December 2016
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Abstract
Diallyl sulfide (DAS), diallyl disulfide (DADS) and diallyl trisulfide (DATS) are major oil-soluble organosulfur compounds of garlic responsible for most of its pharmacological effects. The present study investigated the influence of repeated intraperitoneally (ip) administration of DAS, DADS and DATS on the total
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Diallyl sulfide (DAS), diallyl disulfide (DADS) and diallyl trisulfide (DATS) are major oil-soluble organosulfur compounds of garlic responsible for most of its pharmacological effects. The present study investigated the influence of repeated intraperitoneally (ip) administration of DAS, DADS and DATS on the total level of sulfane sulfur, bound sulfur (S-sulfhydration) and hydrogen sulfide (H2S) and on the activity of enzymes, which catalyze sulfane sulfur formation and transfer from a donor to an acceptor in the normal mouse kidney, i.e., γ-cystathionase (CSE) and rhodanese (TST). The activity of aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH), which is a redox-sensitive protein, containing an –SH group in its catalytic center, was also determined. The obtained results indicated that all tested compounds significantly increased the activity of TST. Moreover, DADS and DATS increased the total sulfane sulfur level and CSE activity in the normal mouse kidney. ALDH activity was inhibited in the kidney after DATS administration. The results indicated also that none of the studied allyl sulfides affected the level of bound sulfur or H2S. Thus, it can be concluded that garlic-derived DADS and DATS can be a source of sulfane sulfur for renal cells but they are not connected with persulfide formation. Full article
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Open AccessArticle Silymarin Activates c-AMP Phosphodiesterase and Stimulates Insulin Secretion in a Glucose-Dependent Manner in HIT-T15 Cells
Antioxidants 2016, 5(4), 47; doi:10.3390/antiox5040047
Received: 4 October 2016 / Revised: 21 November 2016 / Accepted: 6 December 2016 / Published: 12 December 2016
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Abstract
Silymarin (SIL) is a flavonoid extracted from milk thistle seed that has been reported to decrease hyperglycemia in people with type 2 diabetes (T2D). However, it is not known whether SIL has direct secretory effects on β-cells. Using the β-cell line HIT-T15, SIL
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Silymarin (SIL) is a flavonoid extracted from milk thistle seed that has been reported to decrease hyperglycemia in people with type 2 diabetes (T2D). However, it is not known whether SIL has direct secretory effects on β-cells. Using the β-cell line HIT-T15, SIL was shown to decrease intracellular peroxide levels and to augment glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS). However, the latter was observed using a concentration range of 25–100 µM, which was too low to affect endogenous peroxide levels. The stimulatory effect of SIL dissipated at higher concentrations (100–200 µM), and mild apoptosis was observed. The smaller concentrations of SIL also decreased cAMP phosphodiesterase activity in a Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent manner. The stimulatory effects of SIL on GSIS were inhibited by three different inhibitors of exocytosis, indicating that SIL’s mechanism of stimulating GSIS operated via closing β-cell K-ATP channels, and perhaps more distal sites of action involving calcium influx and G-proteins. We concluded that augmentation of GSIS by SIL can be observed at concentrations that also inhibit cAMP phosphodiesterase without concomitant lowering of intracellular peroxides. Full article
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Open AccessArticle RP-HPLC/MS/MS Analysis of the Phenolic Compounds, Antioxidant and Antimicrobial Activities of Salvia L. Species
Antioxidants 2016, 5(4), 38; doi:10.3390/antiox5040038
Received: 25 August 2016 / Revised: 2 October 2016 / Accepted: 14 October 2016 / Published: 21 October 2016
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Abstract
The identification and quantification of the phenolic contents of methanolic extracts of three Salvia L. species namely S. brachyantha (Bordz.) Pobed, S. aethiopis L., and S. microstegia Boiss. and Bal. were evaluated using reverse phase high performance liquid chromatography, UV adsorption, and mass
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The identification and quantification of the phenolic contents of methanolic extracts of three Salvia L. species namely S. brachyantha (Bordz.) Pobed, S. aethiopis L., and S. microstegia Boiss. and Bal. were evaluated using reverse phase high performance liquid chromatography, UV adsorption, and mass spectrometry (RP-HPLC/MS). In order to determine the antioxidant capacity of these species, cupric ions (Cu2+) reducing assay (CUPRAC) and ferric ions (Fe3+) reducing assay (FRAP) were performed to screen the reducing capacity and 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) assay was employed for evaluation of the radical scavenging activity for both solvents. In further investigation, the antimicrobial activities of Salvia species were tested using the disc diffusion method against three Gram-positive and four Gram-negative microbial species, as well as three fungi species. The results showed that there is a total of 18 detectable phenols, the most abundant of which was kaempferol in S. microstegia and rosmarinic acids in S. brachyantha and S aethiopis. The other major phenols were found to be apigenin, luteolin, p-coumaric acid, and chlorogenic acid. All species tested showed moderate and lower antioxidant activity than standard antioxidants such as butylated hydroxyanisole (BHA), butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT), and ascorbic acid. The ethanolic extracts of Salvia species revealed a wide range of antimicrobial activity. S. brachyantha and S. microstegia showed the highest antimicrobial activities against B. subtilis, whereas S. aethiopis was more effective on Y. lipolytica. None of the extracts showed anti-fungal activity against S. cerevisiae. Thus these species could be valuable due to their bioactive compounds. Full article
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Open AccessArticle Antioxidant Activity of Oat Proteins Derived Peptides in Stressed Hepatic HepG2 Cells
Antioxidants 2016, 5(4), 39; doi:10.3390/antiox5040039
Received: 2 August 2016 / Revised: 14 October 2016 / Accepted: 19 October 2016 / Published: 20 October 2016
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Abstract
The purpose of this study was to determine, for the first time, antioxidant activities of seven peptides (P1–P7) derived from hydrolysis of oat proteins in a cellular model. In the oxygen radical absorbance capacity (ORAC) assay, it was found that P2 had the
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The purpose of this study was to determine, for the first time, antioxidant activities of seven peptides (P1–P7) derived from hydrolysis of oat proteins in a cellular model. In the oxygen radical absorbance capacity (ORAC) assay, it was found that P2 had the highest radical scavenging activity (0.67 ± 0.02 µM Trolox equivalent (TE)/µM peptide) followed by P5, P3, P6, P4, P1, and P7 whose activities were between 0.14–0.61 µM TE/µM). In the hepatic HepG2 cells, none of the peptides was cytotoxic at 20–300 µM. In addition to having the highest ORAC value, P2 was also the most protective (29% increase in cell viability) against 2,2′-azobis(2-methylpropionamidine) dihydrochloride -induced oxidative stress. P1, P6, and P7 protected at a lesser extent, with an 8%–21% increase viability of cells. The protection of cells was attributed to several factors including reduced production of intracellular reactive oxygen species, increased cellular glutathione, and increased activities of three main endogenous antioxidant enzymes. Full article
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Review

Jump to: Research

Open AccessReview Vitamin E, Turmeric and Saffron in Treatment of Alzheimer’s Disease
Antioxidants 2016, 5(4), 40; doi:10.3390/antiox5040040
Received: 16 August 2016 / Revised: 2 October 2016 / Accepted: 17 October 2016 / Published: 25 October 2016
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Abstract
Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is a growing epidemic and currently there is no cure for the disease. The disease has a detrimental effect on families and will strain the economy and health care systems of countries worldwide. The paper provides a literature review on
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Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is a growing epidemic and currently there is no cure for the disease. The disease has a detrimental effect on families and will strain the economy and health care systems of countries worldwide. The paper provides a literature review on a few ongoing possible antioxidant therapy treatments for the disease. The paper highlights use of vitamin E, turmeric and saffron for an alternative antioxidant therapy approach. Clinical studies report their therapeutic abilities as protective agents for nerve cells against free radical damage, moderating acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity and reducing neurodegeneration, which are found as key factors in Alzheimer’s. The paper suggests that future research, with more clinical trials focused on more natural approaches and their benefits for AD treatment could be worthwhile. Full article
Open AccessReview Biological Chemistry of Hydrogen Selenide
Antioxidants 2016, 5(4), 42; doi:10.3390/antiox5040042
Received: 18 October 2016 / Revised: 4 November 2016 / Accepted: 8 November 2016 / Published: 22 November 2016
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Abstract
There are no two main-group elements that exhibit more similar physical and chemical properties than sulfur and selenium. Nonetheless, Nature has deemed both essential for life and has found a way to exploit the subtle unique properties of selenium to include it in
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There are no two main-group elements that exhibit more similar physical and chemical properties than sulfur and selenium. Nonetheless, Nature has deemed both essential for life and has found a way to exploit the subtle unique properties of selenium to include it in biochemistry despite its congener sulfur being 10,000 times more abundant. Selenium is more easily oxidized and it is kinetically more labile, so all selenium compounds could be considered to be “Reactive Selenium Compounds” relative to their sulfur analogues. What is furthermore remarkable is that one of the most reactive forms of selenium, hydrogen selenide (HSe at physiologic pH), is proposed to be the starting point for the biosynthesis of selenium-containing molecules. This review contrasts the chemical properties of sulfur and selenium and critically assesses the role of hydrogen selenide in biological chemistry. Full article
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Open AccessReview Berry Fruit Consumption and Metabolic Syndrome
Antioxidants 2016, 5(4), 34; doi:10.3390/antiox5040034
Received: 5 July 2016 / Revised: 7 September 2016 / Accepted: 20 September 2016 / Published: 30 September 2016
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Abstract
Metabolic Syndrome is a cluster of risk factors which often includes central obesity, dyslipidemia, insulin resistance, glucose intolerance, hypertension, endothelial dysfunction, as well as a pro-inflammatory, pro-oxidant, and pro-thrombotic environment. This leads to a dramatically increased risk of developing type II diabetes mellitus
[...] Read more.
Metabolic Syndrome is a cluster of risk factors which often includes central obesity, dyslipidemia, insulin resistance, glucose intolerance, hypertension, endothelial dysfunction, as well as a pro-inflammatory, pro-oxidant, and pro-thrombotic environment. This leads to a dramatically increased risk of developing type II diabetes mellitus and cardiovascular disease, which is the leading cause of death both in the United States and worldwide. Increasing evidence suggests that berry fruit consumption has a significant potential in the prevention and treatment of most risk factors associated with Metabolic Syndrome and its cardiovascular complications in the human population. This is likely due to the presence of polyphenols with known antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects, such as anthocyanins and/or phenolic acids. The present review summarizes the findings of recent dietary interventions with berry fruits on human subjects with or at risk of Metabolic Syndrome. It also discusses the potential role of berries as part of a dietary strategy which could greatly reduce the need for pharmacotherapy, associated with potentially deleterious side effects and constituting a considerable financial burden. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Berry Antioxidants in Health and Disease) Electronic Edition available
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Open AccessReview Blueberries’ Impact on Insulin Resistance and Glucose Intolerance
Antioxidants 2016, 5(4), 44; doi:10.3390/antiox5040044
Received: 17 October 2016 / Revised: 17 November 2016 / Accepted: 18 November 2016 / Published: 29 November 2016
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Abstract
Blueberries are a rich source of polyphenols, which include anthocyanin bioactive compounds. Epidemiological evidence indicates that incorporating blueberries into the diet may lower the risk of developing type 2 diabetes (T2DM). These findings are supported by pre-clinical and clinical studies that have shown
[...] Read more.
Blueberries are a rich source of polyphenols, which include anthocyanin bioactive compounds. Epidemiological evidence indicates that incorporating blueberries into the diet may lower the risk of developing type 2 diabetes (T2DM). These findings are supported by pre-clinical and clinical studies that have shown improvements in insulin resistance (i.e., increased insulin sensitivity) after obese and insulin-resistant rodents or humans consumed blueberries. Insulin resistance was assessed by homeostatic model assessment-estimated insulin resistance (HOMA-IR), insulin tolerance tests, and hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamps. Additionally, the improvements in glucose tolerance after blueberry consumption were assessed by glucose tolerance tests. However, firm conclusions regarding the anti-diabetic effect of blueberries cannot be drawn due to the small number of existing clinical studies. Although the current evidence is promising, more long-term, randomized, and placebo-controlled trials are needed to establish the role of blueberries in preventing or delaying T2DM. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Berry Antioxidants in Health and Disease) Electronic Edition available
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Open AccessReview Protective Role of Dietary Berries in Cancer
Antioxidants 2016, 5(4), 37; doi:10.3390/antiox5040037
Received: 30 June 2016 / Revised: 24 September 2016 / Accepted: 11 October 2016 / Published: 19 October 2016
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Abstract
Dietary patterns, including regular consumption of particular foods such as berries as well as bioactive compounds, may confer specific molecular and cellular protection in addition to the overall epidemiologically observed benefits of plant food consumption (lower rates of obesity and chronic disease risk),
[...] Read more.
Dietary patterns, including regular consumption of particular foods such as berries as well as bioactive compounds, may confer specific molecular and cellular protection in addition to the overall epidemiologically observed benefits of plant food consumption (lower rates of obesity and chronic disease risk), further enhancing health. Mounting evidence reports a variety of health benefits of berry fruits that are usually attributed to their non-nutritive bioactive compounds, mainly phenolic substances such as flavonoids or anthocyanins. Although it is still unclear which particular constituents are responsible for the extended health benefits, it appears that whole berry consumption generally confers some anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory protection to humans and animals. With regards to cancer, studies have reported beneficial effects of berries or their constituents including attenuation of inflammation, inhibition of angiogenesis, protection from DNA damage, as well as effects on apoptosis or proliferation rates of malignant cells. Berries extend effects on the proliferation rates of both premalignant and malignant cells. Their effect on premalignant cells is important for their ability to cause premalignant lesions to regress both in animals and in humans. The present review focuses primarily on in vivo and human dietary studies of various berry fruits and discusses whether regular dietary intake of berries can prevent cancer initiation and delay progression in humans or ameliorate patients’ cancer status. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Berry Antioxidants in Health and Disease) Electronic Edition available
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Open AccessReview Role of Redox Signaling and Inflammation in Skeletal Muscle Adaptations to Training
Antioxidants 2016, 5(4), 48; doi:10.3390/antiox5040048
Received: 10 October 2016 / Revised: 30 November 2016 / Accepted: 8 December 2016 / Published: 13 December 2016
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Abstract
The inflammatory response to exercise-induced muscle damage has been extensively described. Exercise has important modulatory effects on immune function. These effects are mediated by diverse factors including pro-inflammatory cytokines, classical stress hormones, and hemodynamic effects leading to cell redistribution. As has been reported
[...] Read more.
The inflammatory response to exercise-induced muscle damage has been extensively described. Exercise has important modulatory effects on immune function. These effects are mediated by diverse factors including pro-inflammatory cytokines, classical stress hormones, and hemodynamic effects leading to cell redistribution. As has been reported regarding oxidative stress, inflammation can have both detrimental and beneficial effects in skeletal muscle. In this review we will address the role of inflammation on protein metabolism in skeletal muscle. Specifically, we will review studies showing that treatment with cyclooxygenase-inhibiting drugs modulate the protein synthesis response to one bout of resistance exercise and to training. Understanding how these drugs work is important for the millions of individuals worldwide that consume them regularly. We will also discuss the importance of reactive oxygen species and inflammatory cytokines in muscle adaptations to exercise and the Janus faced of the use of antioxidant and anti-inflammatory drugs by athletes for optimizing their performance, especially during the periods in which muscle hypertrophy is expected. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Exercise Induced Muscle Damage and Oxidative Stress)
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