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J. Compos. Sci., Volume 1, Issue 1 (December 2017)

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Editorial

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Open AccessEditorial Journal of Composites Science: A New Journal for Composite Materials, Structures and Experiments
J. Compos. Sci. 2017, 1(1), 1; doi:10.3390/jcs1010001
Received: 28 February 2017 / Accepted: 28 February 2017 / Published: 2 March 2017
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Research

Jump to: Editorial

Open AccessArticle Experimental and Numerical Analysis of Fiber Matrix Separation during Compression Molding of Long Fiber Reinforced Thermoplastics
J. Compos. Sci. 2017, 1(1), 2; doi:10.3390/jcs1010002
Received: 7 April 2017 / Revised: 4 May 2017 / Accepted: 5 May 2017 / Published: 16 May 2017
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Abstract
During the compression molding of long fiber reinforced plastics, significant deviations in fiber content have been observed. These can lead to a decrease of mechanical properties, which could ultimately lead to component failure. Experiments in compression molding with long fiber reinforced plastics in
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During the compression molding of long fiber reinforced plastics, significant deviations in fiber content have been observed. These can lead to a decrease of mechanical properties, which could ultimately lead to component failure. Experiments in compression molding with long fiber reinforced plastics in a complex structure show significant fiber jamming and decrease in fiber content in ribbed sections. The occurring Fiber Matrix Separation (FMS) during processing is assumed to be caused by intensive fiber interaction. The governing mechanisms on FMS are evaluated and a mechanistic model is applied to simulate and predict the effect of FMS during compression molding. Full article
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Open AccessArticle Creep Behavior of Resin Matrix and Basalt Fiber Reinforced Polymer (BFRP) Plate at Elevated Temperatures
J. Compos. Sci. 2017, 1(1), 3; doi:10.3390/jcs1010003
Received: 16 April 2017 / Revised: 19 May 2017 / Accepted: 22 May 2017 / Published: 24 May 2017
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Abstract
Pre-stressed fiber reinforced polymer (FRP) has great application potential in structural strengthening. However, the elevated temperature resistance of FRPs is always a key concern due to the poor thermal stability of its resin matrix. In this study, the effects of temperature on the
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Pre-stressed fiber reinforced polymer (FRP) has great application potential in structural strengthening. However, the elevated temperature resistance of FRPs is always a key concern due to the poor thermal stability of its resin matrix. In this study, the effects of temperature on the creep behavior of the resin matrix and basalt fiber reinforced polymer (BFRP) was experimentally investigated. The tensile stresses were set at 2.6 MPa for the resin matrix and 522 MPa (35% of its ultimate tensile strength (fu)) for BFRP, and the exposure temperatures were 25 °C, 80 °C, 120 °C, and 160 °C. The short-term strain of the resin matrix and BFRP exposed to different exposure temperatures was measured. The variation of the thermal property and interlaminar shear strength (ILSS) of the BFRP were studied. The results indicated that molecular chain disruption and post-cure coexisted. The resin matrix is sensitive to the exposure temperatures, and a remarkable increase of the strain was observed when the exposure temperature exceeded its glass transition temperature (107.5 °C). The resin matrix fractured within 50 seconds when it was exposed to 160 °C. BFRP showed excellent temperature resistance even though the exposure temperature exceeded its glass transition temperature (123.7 °C). Sustained loading led to stress transferring to the basalt fiber in BFRP specimens, especially at elevated temperatures. Stress redistribution caused interfacial damage, and ILSS decreased by 0.5%, 13.6%, and 14.6% for 80 °C, 120 °C, and 160 °C exposure from its original value of 73.5 MPa. Dynamic mechanical thermal analysis (DMTA) was used to explain the post-curing and interface damage of BFRP. Full article

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