Special Issue "Perovskite Catalysts"

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A special issue of Catalysts (ISSN 2073-4344).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (15 February 2014)

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Dr. Yu-Chuan Lin

Department of Chemical Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, 701 Tainan, Taiwan
Website | E-Mail
Phone: 886-6-2757575 ext.62668
Fax: +886-6-234-4496
Interests: perovskite catalysts for oxidations; catalytic hydrodeoxygenation and fast pyrolysis for lignocellulosic biomass conversion; hydrogen and syngas preparation; kinetics and reaction engineering
Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Keith Hohn

Department of Chemical Engineering, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS 66506, USA
Website | E-Mail
Phone: 7855324315
Fax: +1 785 532 7372
Interests: catalysis and reaction engineering; natural gas conversion; oxidative dehydrogenation of light hydrocarbons; millisecond contact time reactors; nanoparticle catalysts

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Perovskite, a mixed metal oxide with a general formula ABO3, is a versatile catalyst with numerous applications. Its unique crystal structure, nonstoichiometric oxygen, acid-base property, redox nature, and thermal stability allow perovskites to be effective in oxidations, exhaust abatement, hydrogenation, and even photocatalysis. Although perovskite has been used in heterogeneous catalysis for many years, it wasn’t until 2002 that was commercially implemented as an exhaust abatement catalyst by Daihatsu Motor. Recently, perovskites have shown promised in biomass conversion, e.g., glycerol partial oxidation to syngas. This has stimulated a recent boom in perovskite study by catalyst scientists. The bibliometric analysis (see Figure 1) done on papers related to perovskites from 2002 to 2011 shows a steadily increasing trend. Therefore, to provide a platform for experience exchange, idea sharing, and inspiration, it is our pleasure to present this special issue for the growing research community of perovskite catalysts.

This issue invites contributions dealing with all fields related to perovskite catalysts. Novel approaches in perovskite synthesis, characterization, and its industrial applications are particularly welcome.

 

 

Dr. Yu-Chuan Lin
Prof. Dr. Keith Hohn
Guest Editors

Submission

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. Papers will be published continuously (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are refereed through a peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Catalysts is an international peer-reviewed Open Access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs).

Keywords

  • perovskite
  • synthesis
  • characterization
  • lattice oxygen
  • acid-base
  • redox

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Editorial

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Open AccessEditorial Perovskite Catalysts—A Special Issue on Versatile Oxide Catalysts
Catalysts 2014, 4(3), 305-306; doi:10.3390/catal4030305
Received: 28 July 2014 / Accepted: 1 August 2014 / Published: 7 August 2014
Cited by 3 | PDF Full-text (931 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Perovskite-type catalysts have been prominent oxide catalysts for many years due to attributes such as flexibility in choosing cations, significant thermal stability, and the unique nature of lattice oxygen. Nearly 90% metallic elements of the Periodic Table can be stabilized in perovskite’s crystalline
[...] Read more.
Perovskite-type catalysts have been prominent oxide catalysts for many years due to attributes such as flexibility in choosing cations, significant thermal stability, and the unique nature of lattice oxygen. Nearly 90% metallic elements of the Periodic Table can be stabilized in perovskite’s crystalline framework [1]. Moreover, by following the Goldschmidt rule [2], the A- and/or B-site elements can be partially substituted, making perovskites extremely flexible in catalyst design. One successful example is the commercialization of noble metal-incorporated perovskites (e.g., LaFe0.57Co0.38Pd0.05O3) for automotive emission control used by Daihatsu Motor Co. Ltd. [3]. Thus, growing interest in, and application of perovskites in the fields of material sciences, heterogeneous catalysis, and energy storage have prompted this Special Issue on perovskite catalysts. [...] Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Perovskite Catalysts)

Research

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Open AccessArticle La0.6Sr0.4Co0.2Fe0.8O3 Perovskite: A Stable Anode Catalyst for Direct Methane Solid Oxide Fuel Cells
Catalysts 2014, 4(2), 146-161; doi:10.3390/catal4020146
Received: 26 February 2014 / Revised: 23 April 2014 / Accepted: 25 April 2014 / Published: 9 May 2014
Cited by 8 | PDF Full-text (5475 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Direct methane solid oxide fuel cells, operated by supplying methane to a Ni/YSZ anode, suffer from degradation via accumulation of carbon deposits on the Ni surface. Coating a 40 µm thin film of La0.6Sr0.4Co0.2Fe0.8O3
[...] Read more.
Direct methane solid oxide fuel cells, operated by supplying methane to a Ni/YSZ anode, suffer from degradation via accumulation of carbon deposits on the Ni surface. Coating a 40 µm thin film of La0.6Sr0.4Co0.2Fe0.8O3 (LSCF) perovskite on the Ni/YSZ anode surface decreased the amount of carbon deposits, slowing down the degradation rate. The improvement in anode durability could be related to the oxidation activity of LSCF which facilitates oxidation of CH4 and carbon deposits. Analysis of the crystalline structure of LSCF revealed that LSCF was stable in the reducing anode environment under H2 and CH4 flow at 750 °C and retained its perovskite structure throughout the 475 h long-term stability test. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Perovskite Catalysts)
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Open AccessArticle In Situ XANES/XPS Investigation of Doped Manganese Perovskite Catalysts
Catalysts 2014, 4(2), 129-145; doi:10.3390/catal4020129
Received: 14 February 2014 / Revised: 26 March 2014 / Accepted: 1 April 2014 / Published: 23 April 2014
Cited by 10 | PDF Full-text (6831 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Studying catalysts in situ is of high interest for understanding their surface structure and electronic states in operation. Herein, we present a study of epitaxial manganite perovskite thin films (Pr1−xCaxMnO3) active for the oxygen evolution reaction
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Studying catalysts in situ is of high interest for understanding their surface structure and electronic states in operation. Herein, we present a study of epitaxial manganite perovskite thin films (Pr1−xCaxMnO3) active for the oxygen evolution reaction (OER) from electro-catalytic water splitting. X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy (XANES) at the Mn L- and O K-edges, as well as X-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS) of the O 1s and Ca 2p states have been performed in ultra-high vacuum and in water vapor under positive applied bias at room temperature. It is shown that under the oxidizing conditions of the OER a reduced Mn2+ species is generated at the catalyst surface. The Mn valence shift is accompanied by the formation of surface oxygen vacancies. Annealing of the catalysts in O2 atmosphere at 120 °C restores the virgin surfaces. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Perovskite Catalysts)
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Open AccessArticle LaNi0.3Co0.7O3-δ and SrFe0.2Co0.8O3-δ Ceramic Materials: Structural and Catalytic Reactivity under CO Stream
Catalysts 2014, 4(2), 77-88; doi:10.3390/catal4020077
Received: 7 November 2013 / Revised: 20 February 2014 / Accepted: 21 February 2014 / Published: 31 March 2014
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (1884 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
In this study, we presented the synthesis of LaNi0.3Co0.7O3−δ (LNCO) and SrCo0.8Fe0.2O3−δ (SFCO) perovskites and their catalytic reactivity under CO gas flow. The synthesis method is based on the complexation method combining ethylenediaminetetraacetic
[...] Read more.
In this study, we presented the synthesis of LaNi0.3Co0.7O3−δ (LNCO) and SrCo0.8Fe0.2O3−δ (SFCO) perovskites and their catalytic reactivity under CO gas flow. The synthesis method is based on the complexation method combining ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA)-citrate. The as-prepared materials were characterized using X-ray diffraction/Rietveld refinement and electron microscopy. The diffractograms and Rietveld refinement showed that the EDTA-citrate method allows us to obtain monophasic powders with submicronic size. The structural analyses revealed different morphologies linked to the crystallinity of LNCO and SFCO, and to the mean crystallite size. The catalytic performances of LNCO and SFCO were studied in situ by Fourier Transform InfraRed spectrometer as a function of time and temperature. The catalytic process gave rise to total oxidation with carbon dioxide and water production. LNCO and SFCO exhibit the same profile for catalytic activity with a conversion rate of twice as high for LNCO. Below 150 °C, the kinetic conversion is slow, but beyond this temperature they reach rapidly the complete transformation at 250 °C and 275 °C for LNCO and SFCO, respectively. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Perovskite Catalysts)

Review

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Open AccessReview Structured Perovskite-Based Catalysts and Their Application as Three-Way Catalytic Converters—A Review
Catalysts 2014, 4(3), 226-255; doi:10.3390/catal4030226
Received: 14 March 2014 / Revised: 9 June 2014 / Accepted: 11 June 2014 / Published: 1 July 2014
Cited by 14 | PDF Full-text (3544 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Automotive Three-Way Catalysts (TWC) were introduced more than 40 years ago. Despite that, the development of a sustainable TWC still remains a critical research topic owing to the increasingly stringent emission regulations together with the price and scarcity of precious metals. Among other
[...] Read more.
Automotive Three-Way Catalysts (TWC) were introduced more than 40 years ago. Despite that, the development of a sustainable TWC still remains a critical research topic owing to the increasingly stringent emission regulations together with the price and scarcity of precious metals. Among other material classes, perovskite-type oxides are known to be valuable alternatives to conventionally used TWC compositions and have demonstrated to be suitable for a wide range of automotive applications, ranging from TWC to Diesel Oxidation Catalysts (DOC), from NOx Storage Reduction catalysts (NSR) to soot combustion catalysts. The interest in these catalysts has been revitalized in the past ten years by the introduction of the concept of catalyst regenerability of perovskite-based TWC, which is in principle well applicable to other catalytic processes as well, and by the possibility to reduce the amounts of critical elements, such as precious metals without seriously lowering the catalytic performance. The aim of this review is to show that perovskite-type oxides have the potential to fulfil the requirements (high activity, stability, and possibility to be included into structured catalysts) for implementation in TWC. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Perovskite Catalysts)
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