Special Issue "Transgenic Technology: Benefits or Dangers?"

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A special issue of Genes (ISSN 2073-4425).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 June 2012)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Franz Theuring (Website)

Institute of Pharmacology, Charite – University Medicine Berlin, Hessische Street 3-4, 10117 Berlin, Germany
Fax: +49 30 450525936
Interests: transgenic technologies; proteomics (2 DE - MS); cardiovascular diseases; vasoactive molecules; functionality of tight junctions; Alzheimer's Disease; Parkinson's Disease; tumorigenesis with focus on breast cancer

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle Assessment of Fecundity and Germ Line Transmission in Two Transgenic Pig Lines Produced by Sleeping Beauty Transposition
Genes 2012, 3(4), 615-633; doi:10.3390/genes3040615
Received: 9 August 2012 / Revised: 10 September 2012 / Accepted: 14 September 2012 / Published: 12 October 2012
Cited by 5 | PDF Full-text (751 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Recently, we described a simplified injection method for producing transgenic pigs using a non-autonomous Sleeping Beauty transposon system. The founder animals showed ubiquitous expression of the Venus fluorophore in almost all cell types. To assess, whether expression of the reporter fluorophore affects [...] Read more.
Recently, we described a simplified injection method for producing transgenic pigs using a non-autonomous Sleeping Beauty transposon system. The founder animals showed ubiquitous expression of the Venus fluorophore in almost all cell types. To assess, whether expression of the reporter fluorophore affects animal welfare or fecundity, we analyzed reproductive parameters of two founder boars, germ line transmission, and organ and cell specific transgene expression in animals of the F1 and F2 generation. Molecular analysis of ejaculated sperm cells suggested three monomeric integrations of the Venus transposon in both founders. To test germ line transmission of the three monomeric transposon integrations, wild-type sows were artificially inseminated. The offspring were nursed to sexual maturity and hemizygous lines were established. A clear segregation of the monomeric transposons following the Mendelian rules was observed in the F1 and F2 offspring. Apparently, almost all somatic cells, as well as oocytes and spermatozoa, expressed the Venus fluorophore at cell-type specific levels. No detrimental effects of Venus expression on animal health or fecundity were found. Importantly, all hemizygous lines expressed the fluorophore in comparable levels, and no case of transgene silencing or variegated expression was found after germ line transmission, suggesting that the insertions occurred at transcriptionally permissive loci. The results show that Sleeping Beauty transposase-catalyzed transposition is a promising approach for stable genetic modification of the pig genome. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Transgenic Technology: Benefits or Dangers?)
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Review

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Open AccessReview Transgenic Models of Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 10: Modeling a Repeat Expansion Disorder
Genes 2012, 3(3), 481-491; doi:10.3390/genes3030481
Received: 2 July 2012 / Revised: 24 July 2012 / Accepted: 26 July 2012 / Published: 30 July 2012
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Abstract
Spinocerebellar ataxia type 10 (SCA10) is an autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disease with a spectrum of phenotypes. SCA10 is caused by a pentanucleotide repeat expansion of the ATTCT motif within intron 9 of ATAXIN 10 (ATXN10). Patients present with cerebellar ataxia; however, [...] Read more.
Spinocerebellar ataxia type 10 (SCA10) is an autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disease with a spectrum of phenotypes. SCA10 is caused by a pentanucleotide repeat expansion of the ATTCT motif within intron 9 of ATAXIN 10 (ATXN10). Patients present with cerebellar ataxia; however, a subset also develops epileptic seizures which significantly contribute to the morbidity and mortality of the disease. Past research from our lab has demonstrated that epileptic SCA10 patients predominantly originate from or have ancestral ties to Mexico. In addition, a large proportion of epileptic SCA10 patients carry repeat interruptions within their SCA10 expansion. This paper outlines the variability in SCA10 phenotypes and our attempts to model these phenotypes using transgenic mouse models and highlights the benefits of using a transgenic model organism to understand the pathological mechanisms of a human disease. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Transgenic Technology: Benefits or Dangers?)

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