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Special Issue "Marine Products for Health and Beauty"

A special issue of Marine Drugs (ISSN 1660-3397).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 December 2017

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Anake Kijjoa

Departamento de Química, Instituto de Ciências Biomédicas de Abel Salazar and CIIMAR, Universidade do Porto, Rua Jorge de Viterbo Ferreira, nº228, 4050-313 Porto, Portugal
Website | E-Mail
Phone: +351-222062288
Interests: characterization and antitumor evaluation of the bioactive compounds from the marine sponges and marine-derived fungi; search for antifungal and antibacterial compounds from higher plants, marine invertebrates, soil and marine-derived fungi
Guest Editor
Prof. Maria Emília de Sousa

1. Laboratório de Química Orgânica e Farmacêutica, Departamento de Ciências, Químicas, Faculdade de Farmácia, Universidade do Porto, Rua Jorge Viterbo Ferreira 228, 4050-313, Porto, Portugal
2. Interdisciplinar de Investigação Marinha e Ambiental (CIIMAR/CIMAR), Universidade do Porto, Terminal de Cruzeiros do Porto de Leixões, Avenida General Norton de Matos, S/N 4450-208 Matosinhos, Portugal
Website | E-Mail
Interests: medicinal chemistry; organic synthesis; heterocycles, P-glycoprotein; anticancer; anticoagulants; chiral drugs

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Our exploitation of the living wealth of the sea, which constitutes more than 70% of the world’s surface, is longstanding. Today, several industries have emerged from our mining of the ocean’s resources, based on bioactives from marine microbes; hydrocolloids, antioxidants and essential fatty acids from microalgae and seaweeds; and biomaterials, such as coral skeleton and collagen for human body repair. Marine-derived compounds have been proved to have great potentials as anti-cancer, anti-inflammatory, anti-parasitic and especially antimicrobial agents since their modes of action are often completely unrelated to terrestrial biochemistries, and, therefore, are able to overcome human and animal pathogen and cancer-cell defense mechanisms. Moreover, the incidence of obesity, has dramatically risen in recent years and many epidemic studies have shown that a prevalence of obesity-related diseases is lower in seafood-consuming population, suggesting a beneficial role of marine foods against obesity. It is believed that some functional ingredients in marine foods account for their anti-obesity effect. Antioxidant pigments (lutein and carotenoids), glucosamine, omega-3 fatty acids and minerals (calcium and magnesium) are also nutritionals from marine sources. On the other hand, marine molecules are expected to contribute strongly to cosmetics as well, because of increasing interest in antioxidants, anti-ageing and skin protection. Therefore, marine bioresources are expected to give rise to ‘marine biotechnology’ products, particularly functional ingredients for nutritionals, cosmetics and pharmaceuticals.

This Special Issue of Marine Drugs on “Marine Products for Health and Beauty” welcomes submission of previously unpublished manuscripts from original work or reviews on all the above aspects, including chemistry and biological activity of chemopreventive and anti-obesogenic compounds, marine products used in cosmeceuticals and nutraceuticals, health and beauty product development and innovation. We plan to receive submissions until 30 October 2017.

Prof. Dr. Anake Kijjoa
Prof. Dr. Maria Emília Sousa
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Marine Drugs is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Marine-derived compounds
  • Marine organisms
  • Nutraceuticals
  • Cosmeceuticals
  • Anti-ageing
  • Skin-protection
  • Anti-obesity
  • Chemoprevention

Published Papers (6 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle Different Levels of Skin Whitening Activity among 3,6-Anhydro-l-galactose, Agarooligosaccharides, and Neoagarooligosaccharides
Mar. Drugs 2017, 15(10), 321; doi:10.3390/md15100321
Received: 22 August 2017 / Revised: 15 October 2017 / Accepted: 16 October 2017 / Published: 20 October 2017
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Abstract
3,6-Anhydro-l-galactose (AHG), a major monomeric constituent of red macroalgae (Rhodophyta), was recently reported to possess skin whitening activity. Moreover, AHG-containing oligosaccharides, such as agarooligosaccharides (AOSs) and neoagarooligosaccharides (NAOSs), have various physiological activities, including anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, and skin moisturizing effects.
[...] Read more.
3,6-Anhydro-l-galactose (AHG), a major monomeric constituent of red macroalgae (Rhodophyta), was recently reported to possess skin whitening activity. Moreover, AHG-containing oligosaccharides, such as agarooligosaccharides (AOSs) and neoagarooligosaccharides (NAOSs), have various physiological activities, including anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, and skin moisturizing effects. In this study, AHG and NAOSs were produced from agarose by enzymatic reactions catalyzed by an endo-type β-agarase, an exo-type β-agarase, and a neoagarobiose hydrolase. In a cell proliferation assay, AHG, AOSs, and NAOSs at 12.5, 25, and 50 μg/mL concentrations did not exhibit cytotoxicity toward murine B16 melanoma cells or human epidermal melanocytes. In an in vitro skin whitening activity assay of AHG, AOSs, and NAOSs at 50 μg/mL, AHG showed the highest skin whitening activity in both murine B16 melanoma cells and human epidermal melanocytes; this activity was mediated by the inhibition of melanogenesis. Neoagarotetraose and neoagarohexaose also exhibited in vitro skin whitening activity, whereas neoagarobiose and AOSs with degrees of polymerization of 3 (agarotriose), 5 (agaropentaose), and 7 (agaroheptaose) did not. Therefore, AHG is responsible for the skin whitening activity of agar-derived sugars, and the structural differences among the AHG-containing oligosaccharides may be responsible for their different skin whitening activities. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Marine Products for Health and Beauty)
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Open AccessArticle Construction of a Fluorescent H2O2 Biosensor with Chitosan 6-OH Immobilized β-Cyclodextrin Derivatives
Mar. Drugs 2017, 15(9), 284; doi:10.3390/md15090284
Received: 21 July 2017 / Revised: 18 August 2017 / Accepted: 26 August 2017 / Published: 4 September 2017
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Abstract
In the present work, a fluorescent H2O2 biosensor was constructed by encapsulating fluorescent probe Rhodamine B (RhmB) in the hydrophobic cavity of the cyclodextrin (β-CD) and immobilizing catalase (CAT) on the 2-NH2 of chitosan (CTS) in a chitosan 6-OH
[...] Read more.
In the present work, a fluorescent H2O2 biosensor was constructed by encapsulating fluorescent probe Rhodamine B (RhmB) in the hydrophobic cavity of the cyclodextrin (β-CD) and immobilizing catalase (CAT) on the 2-NH2 of chitosan (CTS) in a chitosan 6-OH immobilized β-cyclodextrin derivative (CTS-6-CD). The inclusion complex of CTS-6-CD to RhmB (CTS-6-CD-RhmB) was prepared by a solution method. Its structure and inclusion efficiency were determined by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and fluorescence spectroscopy (FL). CAT was immobilized on CTS-6-CD-RhmB to eventually form the functional membrane, CTS-6-CD-RhmB-CAT, via glutaraldehyde crosslinking, which was further characterized by FTIR and FL, and used as a H2O2 biosensor. The functional membrane was used to simultaneously oxidize and detect H2O2. The detection condition was optimized as pH 8, a reaction temperature of 25 °C, and an immobilized enzyme concentration of 2 × 10−4 mol/L. The fluorescence response of the biosensor exhibited a good linear relationship with the concentration of H2O2 in the range of 20 mΜ–300 μM and the detection limit of 10−8 mol/L. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Marine Products for Health and Beauty)
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Open AccessArticle Genome Sequence of Pseudomonas stutzeri 273 and Identification of the Exopolysaccharide EPS273 Biosynthesis Locus
Mar. Drugs 2017, 15(7), 218; doi:10.3390/md15070218
Received: 25 April 2017 / Revised: 26 June 2017 / Accepted: 5 July 2017 / Published: 10 July 2017
PDF Full-text (4385 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
Pseudomonas stutzeri 273 is a marine bacterium producing exopolysaccharide 273 (EPS273) with high anti-biofilm activity against P. aeruginosa PAO1. Here, the complete genome of P. stutzeri 273 was sequenced and the genome contained a circular 5.03 Mb chromosome. With extensive analysis of
[...] Read more.
Pseudomonas stutzeri 273 is a marine bacterium producing exopolysaccharide 273 (EPS273) with high anti-biofilm activity against P. aeruginosa PAO1. Here, the complete genome of P. stutzeri 273 was sequenced and the genome contained a circular 5.03 Mb chromosome. With extensive analysis of the genome, a genetic locus containing 18 genes was predicted to be involved in the biosynthesis of EPS273. In order to confirm this prediction, two adjacent genes (eps273-H and eps273-I) encoding glycosyltransferases and one gene (eps273-O) encoding tyrosine protein kinase within the genetic locus were deleted and biosynthesis of EPS273 was checked in parallel. The molecular weight profile of EPS purified from the mutant Δeps273-HI was obviously different from that purified from wild-type P. stutzeri 273, while the corresponding EPS was hardly detected from the mutant Δeps273-O, which indicated the involvement of the proposed 18-gene cluster in the biosynthesis of EPS273. Moreover, the mutant Δeps273-HI had the biofilm formed earlier compared with the wild type, and the mutant Δeps273-O almost completely lost the ability of biofilm formation. Therefore, EPS273 might facilitate the biofilm formation for its producing strain P. stutzeri 273 while inhibiting the biofilm formation of P. aeruginosa PAO1. This study can contribute to better understanding of the biosynthesis of EPS273 and disclose the biological function of EPS273 for its producing strain P. stutzeri 273. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Marine Products for Health and Beauty)
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Open AccessArticle A New Ergosterol Analog, a New Bis-Anthraquinone and Anti-Obesity Activity of Anthraquinones from the Marine Sponge-Associated Fungus Talaromyces stipitatus KUFA 0207
Mar. Drugs 2017, 15(5), 139; doi:10.3390/md15050139
Received: 6 April 2017 / Revised: 3 May 2017 / Accepted: 10 May 2017 / Published: 16 May 2017
PDF Full-text (3460 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
A new ergosterol analog, talarosterone (1) and a new bis-anthraquinone derivative (3) were isolated, together with ten known compounds including palmitic acid, ergosta-4,6,8(14),22-tetraen-3-one, ergosterol-5,8-endoperoxide, cyathisterone (2), emodin (4a), questinol (4b), citreorosein (
[...] Read more.
A new ergosterol analog, talarosterone (1) and a new bis-anthraquinone derivative (3) were isolated, together with ten known compounds including palmitic acid, ergosta-4,6,8(14),22-tetraen-3-one, ergosterol-5,8-endoperoxide, cyathisterone (2), emodin (4a), questinol (4b), citreorosein (4c), fallacinol (4d), rheoemodin (4e) and secalonic acid A (5), from the ethyl acetate extract of the culture of the marine sponge-associated fungus Talaromyces stipitatus KUFA 0207. The structures of the new compounds were established based on extensive 1D and 2D spectral analysis, and in the case of talarosterone (1), the absolute configurations of its stereogenic carbons were determined by X-ray crystallographic analysis. The structure and stereochemistry of cyathisterone (2) was also confirmed by X-ray analysis. The anthraquinones 4ae and secalonic acid A (5) were tested for their anti-obesity activity using the zebrafish Nile red assay. Only citreorosein (4c) and questinol (4b) exhibited significant anti-obesity activity, while emodin (4a) and secalonic acid A (5) caused toxicity (death) for all exposed zebrafish larvae after 24 h. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Marine Products for Health and Beauty)
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Review

Jump to: Research

Open AccessReview Mycosporine-Like Amino Acids: Potential Health and Beauty Ingredients
Mar. Drugs 2017, 15(10), 326; doi:10.3390/md15100326
Received: 9 August 2017 / Revised: 14 October 2017 / Accepted: 18 October 2017 / Published: 21 October 2017
PDF Full-text (663 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Human skin is constantly exposed to damaging ultraviolet radiation (UVR), which induces a number of acute and chronic disorders. To reduce the risk of UV-induced skin injury, people apply an additional external protection in the form of cosmetic products containing sunscreens. Nowadays, because
[...] Read more.
Human skin is constantly exposed to damaging ultraviolet radiation (UVR), which induces a number of acute and chronic disorders. To reduce the risk of UV-induced skin injury, people apply an additional external protection in the form of cosmetic products containing sunscreens. Nowadays, because of the use of some chemical filters raises a lot of controversies, research focuses on exploring novel, fully safe and highly efficient natural UV-absorbing compounds that could be used as active ingredients in sun care products. A promising alternative is the application of multifunctional mycosporine-like amino acids (MAAs), which can effectively compete with commercially available filters. Here, we outline a complete characterization of these compounds and discuss their enormous biotechnological potential with special emphasis on their use as sunscreens, activators of cells proliferation, anti-cancer agents, anti-photoaging molecules, stimulators of skin renewal, and functional ingredients of UV-protective biomaterials. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Marine Products for Health and Beauty)
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Open AccessReview Hypopigmenting Effects of Brown Algae-Derived Phytochemicals: A Review on Molecular Mechanisms
Mar. Drugs 2017, 15(10), 297; doi:10.3390/md15100297
Received: 29 August 2017 / Revised: 11 September 2017 / Accepted: 20 September 2017 / Published: 24 September 2017
PDF Full-text (1280 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
There is a rapid increase in the demand for natural hypopigmenting agents from marine sources for cosmeceutical and pharmaceutical applications. Currently, marine macroalgae are considered as a safe and effective source of diverse bioactive compounds. Many research groups are exploring marine macroalgae to
[...] Read more.
There is a rapid increase in the demand for natural hypopigmenting agents from marine sources for cosmeceutical and pharmaceutical applications. Currently, marine macroalgae are considered as a safe and effective source of diverse bioactive compounds. Many research groups are exploring marine macroalgae to discover and characterize novel compounds for cosmeceutical, nutraceutical, and pharmaceutical applications. Many types of bioactive secondary metabolites from marine algae, including phlorotannins, sulfated polysaccharides, carotenoids, and meroterpenoids, have already been documented for their potential applications in the pharmaceutical industry. Among these metabolites, phlorotannins from brown algae have been widely screened for their pharmaceutical and hypopigmenting effects. Unfortunately, the majority of these articles did not have detailed investigations on molecular targets, which is critical to fulfilling the criteria for their cosmeceutical and pharmaceutical use. Very recently, a few meroterpenoids have been discovered from Sargassum sp., with the examination of their anti-melanogenic properties and mechanisms. Despite the scarcity of in vivo and clinical investigations of molecular mechanistic events of marine algae-derived hypopigmenting agents, identifying the therapeutic targets and their validation in humans has been a major challenge for future studies. In this review, we focused on available data representing molecular mechanisms underlying hypopigmenting properties of potential marine brown alga-derived compounds. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Marine Products for Health and Beauty)
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